(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Illio"

Published Annually 

All Rights Reserved 

Copyright 1996 



University of Illinois at 

Urbana-Champaign 

Illini Media Company 

57 East Green Street 

(Jiampaign, Illinois 61820 

www.illininiedia.coin/illio 



student life 8 



dcademics 1 04 



I 



Sports 1 52 




Oi^§a.nization.s 232 





index 4 14 



i/ii 



IlHo 1996 
volume 103 

Publisher 

Jim McKellar 

Editor in Chief 

Amara Rozgus 



.•■'''<■".■'■ 



':■■■ "^-y^ 



■•■'//■ y,: 



■■^♦-■i 



,-/v*M3^i, 




I 



in m 
r I Iff 



■A- 






t?,«.-**ai 



wfl 




f^ff 



ri Him 



I 

jHun 





'I'ii 

l!l 



}*<>^ 



i 



«^» ' * * '■*'^* 



ill 

JMl 

■■■ 



-««» iijM-.i«tlJ,^ * , i-"V?^ll.lLui 



^%m 



% 



m 



I 









-Paul tjrano 





he University of Illinois is 



similar to a mosaic-made up 



of many individual pieces and 



incomplete without them all. Each of 



the little parts of our lives at the 



university comes together to form the 



big picture. Every year u^e spend at the 



University of Illinois helps pull together 



those pieces of the puzzle. 



^etcr Matkay 



Opening 



\ 



/^^ 


Hli > 


^ 'j '^1 


P«R|7 


^ 


Ifil 






N 



•^ 



1 >J 




X 


-m 


Kfe^*^ 






Iw^ ■ 




" 1 D 


i^^ 



•*.^)r: 







In" '?^^ ^^ 







-John Kini 




he university would not be complete 
without its people-the faculty, the 
students and the staff. The picture would not 
be complete if we did not have a life outside 
academics, either. We have joined 
organizations and become involved; we have 
come together to combat campus problems; 
and we have celebrated tradition and 
excellence with the Big Ten centennial. 



-P.iiil Grano 



Opening 



«7apirrA^£*, 




ost importantly 



as we will see in 



the following pages, we pull together 



our own individual pieces to make the 



mosiac that is uniquely Illinois. 



-Paul Grant) 



OPENING 



^!^ 




'i 



s 






W^ 


^ 





«r 




iT 



til « 



#' 




Student Life 

Kristina Castillo, Editor 

The student life at the U of I has once again proved that we arc a mosaic 
of events, philanthropies, marches, concerts, comedies and constructions. 

Throughout the 1995-96 school year - through tragedies like the 
Oklahoma City Bombing and changes of old traditions combined with new 
faces and places - we certainly got back what we have put in and were able 
to enjoy life for a while on or off campus. 

Stamina, dedication and the truth behind the slogan "my blood runs 
orange and blue" enabled us to make that extra effort in helping the 
communities of Urbana-Champaign with such events as the C U Special 
Recreation Program. 

Our campus has long been the site of change, strengthening the 
sensitivity of the nation's youth with every battle toward societal 
awareness. We represent a mosaic of our time - with each piece we added 
a new concept to our ideology of what it meant to be a student, an activist, 
a protester and a young adult in a world where change was much needed. 
Students united not only in the name of change, but also for the sake of 
togetherness. Without each piece, there would have been a gap in the 
present band across campus. With every student came a cheer tear giggle 
and fear, no matter how big or small. 

From the epidemics that face our society as a whole, such as AIDS, to the 
daily trials and tribulations of the college freshman, we were there for each 
other to offer support and a much-needed shoulder to cry on. We were 
there to hold banners, make ribbons, sing songs, say prayers - we united our 
pieces one by one, bonding and uniting each fear and concern or joy. It takes 
all kinds to help glue together the array of colors and symbols on our 
mosaic of life at the U of 1. 

Without the roar of a crowd at football games, the laughter between 
friends on the Quad and the hushed words spoken at every coffee house oi- 
campus restaurant, our pieces would have blown away in the wind. Anyone 
can have an idea, but not everyone will voice that opinion and take a stand. 
It takes the best and the brightest, the brave and courageous, the strong 
and the bold, the sensitive and the compassionate, the leaders and speakers 
and the young and the old; it takes the U of I to make a difference. Great 
things happen where there are opportunities for the mind to be stimulated 
by every piece of our mosaic that has been passed along. 

With every spark of desire to attach yet another fundamental piece to 
the mosaic, people were listening. Not all changes happen ovei" night. And 
what better place to be than in the middle of America at the U of 1 where 
there was always an opportunity to express a belief or voice an opinion all 
while supporting each other? 

This is what it means to me to be a part of that mosaic to dedicate 
yourself to the changes of our times. 



joeKaoL'ijL 



i^e/Jv^aifjrAailMiiefMMr 



Oranse and Blue 



Pride forlhe 



i 
I 






^^^^^^^^^^^H n 1993, the U of I had a great Homecoming celebration. 
1^ M ^H This week-long celebration brought current students 

I I ^1 and alumni together for the remembrance of times past 

I I ^1 and fun yet to be had. The events that made up this cel- 

I I ^1 ebration included a football game against the 

I I ^1 Northwestern University (NU) Wildcats, a parade 

I B ^^ through part of the campus area, a pep rally and many 

other events. O The Student Alumni Association 
(SAA) was the main organizer of this prestigious event. All of the events that 
comprised Homecoming week were coordinated by SAA. ^ According to 
Christie Mathieson, junior in CBA and a member of SAA, "We tried a lot of new 
things like a 5K run and the Taste of Homecoming' in order to revitalize the 
student participation in homecoming. We were very happy with the results. " 
All of the events offered during this years Homecoming celebration helped to 
y/-j-i • f^^y. lA/n hrtrl P''^^'*^^ ^" enjoyable atmosphere for the alumni and students 
I I/O yK^Ul VVtz, I IL4L4 ^j^Q participated. □ Homecoming was meant to be an 
O hUQQ turnout /nr opportunity for alumni to come back to the campus and 
"^ /111 ^remember their days of happiness and school spirit here. 

f/iC UlUmS. /i lUZ UJ Many of the organizations, fraternities and sororities held 
tHom Cinx/Orl in- ^P^'^'^' events for alumni who were involved in their organi- 
y zations. The cheerleading squad, the lllinettes and the 

IIOUS6 to rdlVG Marching lllini all had alumni involved in the game-day activ- 
,, .. ities. 3 Many of the fraternities and sororities had open 

*■' '^ LL//icC^C houses or tailgate parties for their alumni. Phi Sigma Sigma, a 
PYDPriPnCP " sorority on campus, held an open house for its alumnae. □ 
' Julie Cirrincione, president of the sorority and junior in LAS, 

said, "This year we had a huge turnout for the alums. A lot of them stayed in- 
house to relive the college experience." ~l Cirrincione said that many of 
the alums responded favorably to the events, "They said that they felt like they 
were home again," she said. H That was precisely what the Homecoming 
events of 1995 were all about. The Homecoming celebration officially got under 
way on Wednesday Oct. 25 with a 5K run and a residence hall decoration con- 
test. Both of these were designed as spirit boosters for the student body over- 
all, n On Thursday, there was a lunch on the Quad and the Students Against 
Muscular Sclerosis (SAMS) Tricycle races. Friday was the day for the parade, the 
pep rally, the "Taste of Homecoming," and the Pop-a-Shot contest. ~l On 
Saturday, there was the Spirit Competition, the game against the NU Wildcats 
and the African-American Homecoming Dance. Throughout all of these events, 
there was a good sense of student and alumni involvement. 

CONTINUED ON PAGE I3 

Story by Ben Hoyle 
layout by Amara Rozgus 




10 



Student Life 






(J The 1995 Homecoming parade finished its 
procession on the Quad. The U of I cheer- 
leaders performed routines on the patio of 
Foeilinger for the many onlookers 



-Paul Grano 

I I Homecoming King Andre Carter, senior in LAS, and Homecoming 
Queen Lori Ann Allaman, senior in Agriculture, smile as they are 
crowned at halftime of the Homecoming football game against 
Northwestern. The Student Alumni Association organized 
Homecoming weekend. 

1^ Members of the Armed Forces march in the iqq. Homecoming 
parade They marched in the parade with the Marching lllini, the 
cheerleading squad, the flag corps as well as many other groups. 



Homecoming 



1 1 



frx/^mevx/yjif 



^ «*?»"«« 






4k «<•*« 






*>«*-:• 



^.-.. 



■■< --f*- 



»v 



■J The lllinettes perform in front of 
Foellinger Auditorium on the Quad 
They danced for the 1995 Homecoming 
Pep Rally on Friday night before the 
llhnois-Northwestern game. 



[^U of I cheerleaders pump up 
the crowd at the Homecoming 
Pep Rally. Students, alumni and 
community members gathered 
on the Quad Friday night for 
the Pep Rally sponsored by the 
Student Alumni Association. 



'iThe Homecoming parade 
included several students 
showing off their unique 
abilities The parade finished 
on the Quad with a pep rally. 



,^.^ 
^■^ 



■ -*-""- 



f ■• ■■ -v^-- i 



12 



Student Life 




>^. 



•^ 



Celebration 




good to know that we could play a close game against a team 
that rolled over Wisconsin, 35-0. H Part of the game- 




fcpr the Fighting lllini 



11 of the Homecoming events centered around the foot- 
ball game against the NU Wildcats. This was the event 
that by far had the most participation; there were more 
than 65,000 people in attendance at Memorial Stadium. 
Normally, a game against NU would not attract much 
attention, but in 1995 the Wildcats were on a roll and 
the lllini had quite a game ahead of them. The Wildcats 
had only lost one game in their season and had beaten 
some tough teams by sound margins. Everyone knew that in order to beat NU, 
the football team would have to play really well. During an exciting football 
game of hard-nosed football, the Wildcats took the victory by a margin of three 
points. n Dan Gach, a sophomore in FAA, who attended the game report- 
ed, "It was a disappointing loss, but we played well as a 
team." 1 However disappointing the loss was, it was It SQ^IDQU llKQ tilQ 

campus was really 

day celebrations were provided by the Marching lllini. They QIW/Q aflCl UUSV 
played during the pre-game warm-ups, played inspirational 
songs during the game and put on a show during half-time. 
The half-time show included a skit and the traditional three- 
in-one. "~! Holly Schupple, sophomore in FAA and a mem- 
ber of the Marching lllini, said of her part in the celebration, 
"It's thrilling to be a part of such a big tradition." 1 She 
also commented on the tremendous crowd response to the 
Marching lllini's presence. 1 Even the freshmen and 
transfer students were caught up in the Homecoming cele- 
brations. Many of the freshmen on campus were able to participate in the 
week's events. i Missy Sutherland, freshman in Agriculture, said, "The 

game was a lot of fun because we played it close and being that it is my first 
Homecoming, it was good to see how enthusiastic everyone was." ~i All in 
all, the events of Homecoming week were a success in allowing students and 
alumni a chance to enjoy their common link of the U of I. '~' "It seemed 
like the campus was really alive and busy and that there were a lot of alums on 
campus to show their school spirit," said Christi Colba, junior in CBA. G 
With all of the things happening on campus and all of the people visiting, the 
University of Illinois truly came alive during Homecoming '95. 



and that there 
were a lot of 
alums on campus 
to show their 
school spirit" 



story by Ben Hoyle 
layout by Amara Rozgus 



HOMECOMING 



13 



jVx^ampiBKim^ 



\\ NiteRides offers rides to students every 
evening until approximately a a.m. It is 
supported by volunteers who take turns 
driving students. They can be reached at 
333-3184 




J^^^^Sl^^^' 



r.4j 




J^ 



-Charles Cass 



-Charles Cass 



. I Dispatchers for NiteRides coordi- 
nate pick up places and times. 
NiteRides is run by Volunteer lllini 
Projects. 

I When other drivers are unavail- 
able, the student patrol drives the 
NiteRides van NiteRides is working 
with the Champaign-Urbana Mass 
Transit District (MTD) to help keep 
students safe late at night. 



Student Life 




Takins A Bite 




CDut^^f dampus drime 



^^^^^^^^^H^H t the infamous freshman orientation sessions held in the 
I ■■ ^H summer months, all incoming freshmen were hopeless vic- 

I !■ ^1 tims of the boring and strung-out "safety in numbers" 

I ■■ ^H speeches. With chuckles and sighs, one by one, each stu- 

I m^k ^H dent felt that it could never happen to her or him. This past 

I ^^^ ^1 year, the campus community was saddened and outraged at 

I Km ^ ^ ^he loss of a university member to campus violence in the 
fall of 1995. The pain of reality swept over the campus and 
the "safety in numbers" speeches were mocked no more. -> Concern for our 
safety and the safety of others is an issue that is present all of the time especially 
on college and university campuses. Unfortunately, it was still 
not a major priority to some due to the "'It won't happen to me" 
syndrome. 1 "I've heard the stats, and I always knew never 
to walk alone late at night. But I still never really imagined 
myself ever being attacked or anything," said Leanne Welch, 
junior in Agriculture. "During the week after the murder on cam- 
pus, which was the first one in over a decade, I was apprehen- 
sive to even walk to class from my apartment. It consumed my 
thoughts, which was not a really good thing in a way." ,-| 
Students on campus, particularly female students, were given ]/\/QS CIDDf^ll6flS!\/6 
whistles to carry on their key chains after arriving to their dorms , n j. 

as freshmen. This was part of the WhistleStop program spon- *-^ C VC/l vVUIr\ L\J 
sored by the Office of Woman's Programs. Other university ser- flflCC ffOYYt YY\\/ 
vices include escorts for students as they wait for the MTD •' ^ 

busses, and around campus buildings to and from various park- CiuOilXlTiQXW.. It 
ing lots. However, the most infamous campus service has always ^Qf^^^fy|^^ ^w 
been NiteRides, which began in 1974 and has been directed by ^^^' •-'*^' •■•-v^ jf 

Volunteer lllini Projects since 1993. 1 "An important thing to tf^OUQlltS ]A/hlCh 
remember is that this community had the same types of problems 

as bigger cities this past year and the year before that and so on. WUb I lUL U lizUlly 
But without these tragedies being so chronic, we have a tenden- rir\f^H fhiltin IKI H 
cy to think we are sealed off from this," stated Anna Hysell, -^ -^ 

junior in LAS. "I loved hanging out with my friends at the campus 
bars, but never did I not make our safety a priority for the night. 
We always found a group of friends to hook up with to walk to our apartments 
with " The services were there, and the students to use those services were 

there. Students were urged to take precautions even during daylight hours. If there 
was a lesson out there to be taught it was that violence and assault could happen 
night or day. 1 Neely Lane, junior in ALS, stated, "If I did not have a car, and I 
knew that I could not get a ride or have some friends come to pick me up, I would 
not have hesitated to call NiteRides. I can remember thinking "why is that necessary' 
as a freshman, but without these services, it may not have been so long between 
such violent murders on campus." 



"During the week 
after the murder 
on campus, which 
was the first one 
in over a decade, I 



way. 



story by Kristina Castillo 
layout by Amara Rozgus 



Campus Safety 



15 



[jSophomore in LAS Meyako 
Hughes reads a book on her 
plush bed of pillows. Students 
try to decorate their rooms to 
reflect their own style and per- 
sonality. 




■^ 
■^ 







'■— — ^ 


— ^ 


-^ 


■ -^ 








^ 









\\ Freshman in CBA Sarah Brooks 
heats a snack in her 
microwave. It is not 
uncommon to find a dorm 
room that is fully equipped 
with appliances and other 
electronic toys. 





-Paul Crano 





A Personal Touch 

IVIaRes It Feel LiRe Horn 



ne of the first things everyone had to deal with when 
going away to college was living in a dorm. The first 
shock of this new living experience could have very 
well been realizing that you could not get all your stuff 
into one very small living space, let alone your room- 
mate's stuff. Then came the problem of making your 
room a little less drab. The answer for many new stu- 
dents was decorating. With the right touches, any room 
can reflect the true personality of the person inside it. Of course there is always 
the matter of finding the perfect decorations. □ "Two of my favorite things 
in my room were my rugs. They had different patterns on them. One has a rail- 
road on it and the other has a farm. " said Kelly Freeze, freshmen in FAA. □ 
A hard thing for many students was to try to find a place to //. . , 

put everything and still make things look organized. Many ' /Cyi/fcTCi Illy IkJkJIII 
students got shelves or even large entertainment systems to Hofni ICO if \A/nC 
get their stuff in order. □ "We had a TV, VCR, microwave 

and refrigerator, " said Bonnie Krodel sophomore in LAS. "To jDUlL Of rily Ol/i/li 
keep everything organized, we had a big shelving unit that 
took up one whole wall in our room. It looked good but 
people teased us because we looked spoiled." □ One 
big trend many people became hooked on was the compul- 
sion to put glow-in-the-dark stars all over their ceiling. 
□ "I think the reason glow-in-the-dark stars and constel- 
lations are so popular is because it's a cheesy thing that only 
college aged people would bother to do, " stated Rozalyn 
Torto, freshman in FAA. "My mother would be mad if 1 did it 
at home, and after college it will probably seem immature 
to me that I even bothered with such a stupid detail. " O 
Decorating may become a problem when two roommates 

have different preferences in deciding what makes an t/iClt I c//cCtcCl /7/y 
attractive room. G "My roommate was always hanging 
up advertisements and stuff she sees in magazines," said 
April Jones, freshman in FAA. "Not only did it look bad, but I thought it was bet- 
ter to have a room that was neat, tidy and looked like it belongs to an adult." 
O Once people decorate their dorm room, many of them said it was one of 
their favorite places to be. □ "I loved my room because it was part of my 
own world. When things got hectic and crazy I knew I could come here and 
relax in a room that was surrounded by things 1 put up and that reflected my 
personality," said Danielle Wiara, freshman in FAA. □ Almost everyone 
agreed it was a necessity to decorate your room if you did not want to go 
insane. □ "You want to decorate it because it is depressing looking at the 
bear walls," said Ellen Theodore, senior in CBA. "You need to make it more like 
home. More comfortable and cozy, or you feel like you are in an institution." 



world. When 
things got hectic 
and crazy I knew I 
could come here 
and relax in a 
room that was sur- 
rounded by things 



personality 




M DECORATIONS 



Sexual Assault 

The iVlarcrh /Vgainst 




# 



^^^^^^^^^^^k or many, the month of April was a blessing after anoth- 
I ^M ^H er long, harsh Illinois winter. College students began to 

I ■ ^^k anticipate the closing of the school year. However, April 

I ^^ ^H had another important meaning for many: it was Sexual 

I ^^ ^H Assault Awareness Month. Here at the U of 1, the women 

I I ^^k and men on campus gathered together to participate in 

I M ^W the annual Take Back the Night March. □ On the 

night of Friday, April 28, 1995, hundreds of students ral- 
lied around the Quad to voice their concerns, express their opinions and show 
their interest in the prevention of the ongoing misfortunes of rape and sexual 
assault victims. The night began on the Quad as 500 men and women listened 
to the personal stories of others who voiced the traumas of their experiences 
with sexual violence. □ The purpose of these orations were not to extract 
pity or sympathy from the devoted listeners. Instead, the goal was to enable 
students to grasp a better understanding of sexual vio- 
lence and to become aware of its presence in our commu- 
nity. They showed that behind every fact and statistic there 
was a face. □ Melissa Dessert, director of rape crisis 
services, said, "The two survivors who spoke out at the 
beginning of the march were an excellent reminder of the 
violent realties existing in our community. " □ After the 
commemoration on the Quad, the march around Champaign 
and Urbana began. Students, alumni, local residents and 
even children participated in the vigil. The children who 
had the misfortune of experiencing sexual violence led the 
way for the many others to follow. □ With one goal in 
mind, the marchers chanted various phrases and slogans as 
they overtook the streets of our community. A few popular 
phrases shouted were "2-4-6-8, no more date rape" and 
"Whatever I wear, wherever I go, yes means yes, and no 
While the women and children participated, the men 
remained stationary by shielding the marchers for safety reasons. However, 
they expressed their views by joining in on the chants and holding posters and 
signs. The night was succesful due to help and eager participation of everyone 
involved. □ Each year. Take Back the Night displays more and more trau- 
matized faces and stories, as the problem continues to escalate. The university 
took part in preventing sexual assault by offering support groups, rape crisis 
hot lines and by administering whistles to students used to fend off attackers. 
□ Jill Bening, freshmen in LAS, stated, "I thought Take Back the Night was an 
important event held at U of I. This event made everyone more aware of the 
dangers surrounding a college campus. " CI Stacy Shindler, sophomore in 
LAS, said, "I can't put to words the overwhelming feelings and emotions I felt 
during the march. Everyone should experience Take Back the Night." 

story by Anne Peterson 
layout by Colleen Christensen 



T/?e f 1/1/0 survivors 

who spoke out at 

the beginning of 

the march were 

an excellent 

reminder of the 

violent realties 

existing in our 

community." 



means no. 




18 



STUOENT'-LlFE 




fl Women marched down Green Street hop- 
ing to show how many people are affected 
by sexual violence and encourage others to 
Join in Take Back the Night. With one goal 
in mind, the marchers chanted various 
phrases and slogans as they overtook the 
streets of our community. 





fl Before the march began, opponents of 
campus rape gathered on the Quad and lis- 
tened to speakers tell their personal expe- 
riences with sexual violence. The goal of 
the orations was to enable students to 
grasp a better understanding of sexual vio 
ence and to become aware of its presence 
in our community 



-Claudette Roulo 



Take back the Night 



19 



Wicked Tattoo 



Get VoLirself /K 



If you could han- 
dle Grog's Pizza 
after a heavy 
night at the bars, 
then you could 
handle a couple of 
needles," 



^^^^^^^^^^^^B nimals, symbols, people, words, phrases and flowers - you name it, and they 
I H ^1 got it. Tattoos were the name of the game this past year as U of I students 

I ■■ ^H strutted their stuff bearing all kinds of parts to make a statement. The 

I ■ ■ ^H overall consensus on campus was that tattoos were some pretty serious 

I !■■ ^H business; however, it was a price that some were willing to pay. "I 

I ^^^ ^H think they were a great way to express individuality, " said Kelly Brown, 
1 W W ^^ junior in FAA, "but a person should not get one because it was trendy or 
because it was in style.' It should be an individual statement - something 
that helped define who you were as a person. 1 got one last year and I will never regret having it." 
It was trendy and may continue to be "cool" for some time, but perhaps the student body mere- 
ly reflected a growing population of individuals out to express their own ideologies. For some, 
it was no longer a question of profession. Considerations such as "I cannot get it on my ankle 
because it would show if I did not wear socks" or "I need to get it where my par- 
ents would not see it" are statements of the past. Societal ideals of the body have 
changed in the 1990s. Alterations of the body, so to speak, were characteristics of 
a person - it showed what they had to offer to their friends, lovers, community, 
church and family. Although tattoos were a spiritual statement for most, 
people were not impulsive on the decision to get one. "FOREVER" was a word with 
great baggage attached. "I think tattoos are great for some people, but not 
all people, ' said Claire Fleischer, junior in LAS. "Personally, I would never get one 
because it would be there for the rest of my life. What if in ten years I hated it?" 
The pain was reportedly not all that bad. "If you could handle Grog's Pizza 
after a heavy night at the bars, then you could handle a couple of needles," said 
Brown. ~i If one was that sure of the morals, virtues or what have you of his 
particular belief, then all the power was to him. "Most tattoos matched the personality of the per- 
son who had it and looked great on that person because it showed how unique they were," said 
Dawn Verest, junior in FAA. "But because they lasted forever, I would be worried that it might look 
bad in 30 years or so." There were a lot more butterflies, daisies and sunflowers (besides 
symbols were designed by the proud owner of a new tattoo) tattooed in various places than in the 
past decades. If you saw that big old heart with the banner with the word "MOM" inscribed in it, the 
chances were that you hung out on the wrong campus. Tattoos were a product of the times - that 
was, the time for realism and individualism. Unified, but with distinction. 

story by Kristina Castillo 
layout by Jill Kogan 



20 




Student X, I FE 



fam!^m!^m^^ 



Kii-y.< 




Paul Grano 




; A resident of Urbana gets a 
whale tattooed on her arm. She 
said it was not that painful. 
There are several tattoo artists 
in the Champaign-Urbana area 
that cater to those wanting a 
tattoo. 

■^ A university student shows off 
her rose tattoo. Many students 
get tattoos for personal rea- 
sons and the tattoos generally 
reflect their personalities. 



I Tattoo artist Ray Allen Hughes cleanses 
an area during the application of a tat- 
too. It is a good idea not to rush into 
getting a tatoo because it is permanent. 



-Paul Crano 




-Andrew Ryback 

I I Mourners for the Oklahoma City bombing 
victims gather on the Quad. A large blue 
ribbon was available for students to sign 
on the south side of the lllini Union. 



I I U of I students and members of the 
Champaign and Urbana communities 
remembered the victims and the survivors 
of the bombing through the distribution of 
more than j.ooo blue ribbons. The demon- 
strations on campus were a positive sign 
and showed support for those in need. 




22 



STUDENT LIFE 





/f'' 




4 



i^wiif 






Jlg»«p"*^ 



-Andrew Ryback 




Blue Ribbon 

Support on the Quad 



he world was awestruck when the Murrah Federal 
Building in Oklahoma City was bombed last year. But 
just like every other tragedy that has ever occurred, the 
world pulled together and tried to give as much support 
as possible to the victims and the victims families. The 
University of Illinois is just one institution that showed 
its support towards Oklahoma City. O U of 1 remem- 
bered the victims and the survivors of the bombing 
through the distribution of blue ribbons on the Quad. Laura Coy, junior in LAS, 
was the student who came up with the idea of passing out blue ribbons on the 
Quad. She and her roommates put together the day on the Quad. □ "We 
were watching all the coverage on TV and they kept saying that they wanted 
people's prayers, " Coy said. "This is a way to increase cam- ,,^ .. j. ^ i 

pus awareness. " □ The day was a huge success. During V_L'//trC^v_ JCLlClCI ILj 
the first few hours, all 400 blue ribbons were distributed. Jjl{p ff) Ho in\/r)l\/Pti 
The demand from the students was unanticipated. That 

night, students stayed up and put together 2,600 more blue QriU tO SUPDOrt 
ribbons, which were donated by a local charity. Also, a large 
blue ribbon was available for students to sign on the south 
side of the lllini Union. This gave students, faculty and citi- 
zens of Champaign-Urbana to write words of encouragement 
for the victims and their families. The large blue ribbon was 
sent to a Presbyterian church, where the names of the vic- 
tims and survivors were on display. G Many students 




people who have 
been victims of 
circumstances out 




of their control. 

were affected by the bombing, even though it was so far / /7^ riUUOnS Otter 

Students an 



opportunity to 
show their 
support" 



away. Maria Berrera, junior in LAS, works in an environment 
with many little children. "If it can happen there, it can hap- 
pen anywhere," she stated. □ Many U of I students 
showed compassion during the week of the bombing. 
Displaying blue ribbons on their school bags or on their 
clothing was a way to show that students on this campus 
really do care about what is happening in society today. 
Theresa Valdez, junior in CBA, stated, "College students like to be involved and 
to support people who have been victims of circumstances out of their control. 
The ribbons offer students an opportunity to show their support." □ In 
another show of support in Champaign-Urbana, there was a prayer service at 
the Champaign County Courthouse on the "National Day of Prayer." Not even 
rainy conditions could keep civilians away from praying for the victims and the 
survivors of the bombing. □ The Oklahoma City bombing could have hap- 
pened anywhere in the world. By wearing the blue ribbons of support demon- 
strated that students on the U of 1 campus are not oblivious to what happened. 
Both horror and heroism were demonstrated side by side on the site of the 
bombing, which showed how much compassion Americans really do have for 
one another. The demonstrations on our campus were a positive sign and 
showed support for those in need. 

story by Adam Slahor 
layout by Amara Rozgus 



Oklahoma City bombing 




23 






Si Se Puede 



Yes, We CZskin 



a Casa Cultural Latina of the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign first opened its doors in the fall of 
1974 under the Office of Student Affairs. La Casa came 
into existence after an active struggle on the part of 
Latinos on campus and the aid of outside Latino groups. 
The center was an outgrowth of La Colectiva Latina, an 
organization created in the 1970s by 50 Latino students 
who were in search of identity and unity. □ After 
its creation, funds were not available to hire a director with tuition and fee 
waiver benefits, so La Casa was originally run by a committee of students. La 
Casa has evolved through its 21 years of existence. Now, in the recent past, a 
// /I /i T/l 1//0/OK/- /^-f '^"" ^'"^^ director and students ran the many programs 

/t/ICI Zl/ ytzUlb Uj offered by La Casa. La Casa reinforced the motto "Si Se 
Hpifin in ^IJCh Q f'"^^^ ^^^' ^^ can), its purpose was to provide programs 

and activities that were culturally and intellectually rele- 
vant to Latino/a undergraduate and graduate students. La 
Casa's goal was to assist and encourage students to have a 
successful experience at the University of Illinois. In addi- 
tion, La Casa served those non-Latino/a students, faculty 
and staff who were interested in becoming more aware of 
the issues and concerns affecting Latinos/as in the United 
States. □ La Casa Cultural Latina had not only grown 
in number, but also in size. In the fall of 1995, La Casa relo- 
cated from its original house on East Chalmers Street in Champaign to a larger 
house on East Nevada in Urbana. The ceremony that took place was described 
by Giraldo Rosales, the director of La Casa, as, "The ending of one chapter and 
the beginning of a new chapter." □ The move was a victory for La Casa 
and for the Latino/a students on campus here at the U of 1. Martha Zurita, grad- 
uate student, stated, "The move showed that the university recognizes Latinos 
- recognizes that we are growing, and that is one step in the right direction." 
□ John Heskin, junior in CBA, agreed with Zurita. "After 20 years of being in 
such a small house, I was glad that the university finally gave La Casa a better 
facility," stated Heskin. □ The students and staff at La Casa were forced 
to leave behind many memories. One of the greatest was the mural that was 
painted in the main room 20 years ago by Oscar from Puerto Rico. The mural 
captured the feeling of Latino students who were trying to succeed at the 
University of Illinois, and also the crisis in confronting a culture in which one 
was expected to conform without the opportunity to conform. As this mural 
stayed behind, a new one was created to symbolize this new beginning. 

story by Hilda Arenas 
layout by Jill Kogan 



small house , I 

was glad that the 

university finally 

gave La Casa a 

better facility." 



f 



•w 



I i Senior in Ediioiiion Bri>;id Biirko \\\\<'\' 

Juan Jinienei. froshman in LAS. U ( .I'-.i » 
goal is la assist and encourage stiidtMUv ui 
li.iM- .1 MuiCNsfii! rxpnionic .11 llio I' i>l I 





-Paul Crano 



-Paul Crano 



I I Hilda Arenas and Gina Haro work on a lay- 
out for a flyer at La Casa headquarters. In 
the fall of 1995, La Casa relocated from its 
original house on East Chalmers Street in 
Champaign to a larger house on East 
Nevada in Urbana. 



Jerry Garcia 






The Leaend of 



^^^^^^^^^^^H s the Grateful Dead finished the third set at Soldier 
I ■■ ^H Field on July 9, 1995, no one knew that they were hear- 

I ■■ ^H ing the soulful sound of Jerry Garcia for the last time. 

I ■ ■ ^H One month later, the guitar legend was discovered dead 

I m^k ^H in his bedroom at Serenity Knolls Drug Treatment 

I ^^^ ^H Center, where he was trying to clear the clouds of drug 
B -P * ' ^ ^ addiction. Senior Dave Moser said, "We've lost a great 
friend." □ Jerry Garcia's musical career started as 
a boy. The piano was his instrument of choice at first, but after his brother acci- 
dentally chopped off one of Jerry's finger on his right hand, he began to play 
the guitar. Jerry dove in full force, practicing hours a day learning jazz, blues 
and folk fundamentals. After a brief stint in the Army, Jerry 
plunged into the San Francisco coffee house scene, enabling 
him to meet musicians and play frequently on stage. It was 
during this time that he met his current band members and 
formed the Warlocks, later to become the Grateful Dead. The 
band, along with Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters, rode 
the crest of the psychedelic era, creating the legendary acid 
Jjwpc nnH fYll ]QJf~ j^ tests, and creating a sense of individualism never seen before. 

The rest is history. □ Jerry Garcia was the founder of the 
Grateful Dead, a band, who for more than three decades 
brought music to new heights combining jazz, folk balladry, 
transcultural rhythmatism, modern soundscapes, blues, coun- 
try and rock n' roll, into a unique blend of mind opening 
music. The band always built and expanded on musical ideas 
through years of studio recorded material, but always were at their best live. 
"I've never heard music move in so many different directions," said sophomore 
Kate Abrams. □ Out of almost every show, bursts of pure musical discov- 
ery erupted into jams that went places never reached before, flowing from an 
emotional storehouse. This style of playing developed a huge, tribal following, 
which met at venues around the world to escape the perils of everyday life, and 
experience true joy. From this phenomenon came the saying, "there's nothing 
like a Grateful Dead concert." □ While Jerry Garcia may have died young, 
his impact on millions of fans remains, and his music will live forever. Aside 
from thousands of hours of live music available on tape and CD, Garcia per- 
formed with countless other musicians on many different musical outings. G 
Jerry once told an interviewer for Rolling Stone, "No matter what happens, you 
need music. We need magic, and bliss, and power, and celebration in our lives, 
and music is a good way to encapsulate a lot of it. It's great to be involved in 
something that provides some uplift and comfort in people's lives. Thai doesn't 
hurt anybody." □ Thanks, Jerry. Keep on truckin'. 

story by Paul Giano 
layout by Jill Kogan 



" We need magic, 
and bliss, and 

power, and cele- 
bration in our 



a good way to 
encapsulate a lot 




of it 





^^{ 



26 



STUDENT Life 



% . 



,t?y.--' 




I I Together with bandniates, Jerry 

Garcia rocks out on stage 
Jerry Garcia was the founder of 
the Grateful Dead, a band, who 
for more than three decades 
brought music to new heights. 





-File Photo 

II Thousands of fans pack a crowded RFK 
stadium to hear the Grateful Dead perform 
hve. Every performance was a burst of pure 
musical discovery. 

l) Playing for his fans was a passion of Jerry 
Garcia's and one of the reasons they 
toured so often. A month after the Grateful 
Dead played at Soldier Field in Chicago, 
Garcia was discovered dead at the Serenity 
Knolls Drug Treatment Center. 




jmHtSS-'SSii!^ 



JERRY GARCIA 




Quad Day 



Cheap Eats 



/\t ^ 




lii 



7 always liked 

Quad day because 

it was a great way 

to see what kinds 

of organizations 

and groups were 

on campus. " 



uad day was an annual event at the university that had 
become more of a legacy than anything else. The day 
before classes started, literally hundreds came and 
showed their enthusiasm for their organization, group 
or club. They had everything from fraternity and soror- 
ity row to any kind of religious fellowship group that 
had existed from here to Jupiter. "1 T always liked 
Quad day because it was a great way to see what kinds 
of organizations and groups were on campus," said Dawn Verest, junior in ALS. 
"It was also a good way to be introduced to those clubs that otherwise may go 
unnoticed." ~] Where else could you visit the members of the Boomerang 
club or the Falling lllini? And who could have forgotten the acronym club that 
existed here at the U of I? CD Thousands of students and locals came to see 
friends and faculty that they may not have seen since the previous spring 
semester, or some just came for the cheap grub. The enticing barbecure scent 
wafted all across campus. G "I thought the best part of 
Quad day was the picnic aspect of it all," said Kelly Brown, 
junior in FAA. "Oh, and the free stuff was not too bad either. 
My friends and I just brought a blanket that we set up on 
the grass at the south end of the Quad. That way you could 
still see the performances, like the lllinets, at the north end 
by Foellinger and enjoy that last smell of summer fun 
before fall semester begins and we are all in hell again." 
n "I thought Quad day was the first thing of the year that 
did not involve spending any money," Brown said. "It was 
not all that often that someone went to college and could 
live cheap. This was an ideal event for the entire student 
body." ~I Quad day was practically the only event on campus that involved 
a huge part of the student body without some sort of drinking special. Perhaps 
the word "free" was the main motivator for the students. Where else could you 
get enough cups for that kick-off-kegger? And those little pencil tops that MTD 
gave out? One even got to pick the color of the bus shaped eraser he or she 
wanted. ~l The information one aquired was greater than anything from 
one of those general education electives that nearly everyone took for two 
years. H "I enjoyed Quad day," said Claire Fleischer, junior in LAS. "Being 
a transfer student I thought that it was a good idea to find out about all of the 
things that went on in campustown for students to get involved in." ~\ So 
remember, if you missed out you could catch it again; however, if the sign for 
your kegger says "bring your own cup" then everyone sure knew you were not 
at the happening place on Aug. 23, 1995. 

story by Kristina Castillo 
layout by Amara Rozgus 




■ .*iM»*.»>>t,jlJM»*ftftrt<s» *»haa^>.W 



!fl 





-Joel Rennich 

||a budding athlete shows off his slam dunk 
at Quad Day. Many students and communi- 
ty members attend Quad Day to check out 
the many activities available at the U of I. 





ijA karate fool shows off his amazing abilities 
for many onlookers on Quad Day. Many mar- 
tial arts clubs perform on Quad Day to entice 
others to join their organization. 

fl Often seen on the Quad, an anonymous U of 
I student shows off one of his many talents. 
He says it is relaxing him and helps hjs hand- 
eye coordination. 



-Tim Hutchison 




UAD Day 29 



11 Kool-Aid chugging was one of the 
many exciting events that occurred 
at the 1995 Forbes Fest. The cele- 
bration consisted of several local 
bands, carnival games, prizes and 
food for all 




j_J Tom ciiiriiiinv on his musu. Andy 
Grukcvuh pleases his many fans 
from Forbes Hall Al ihe Forbes 
festival, the students were enter- 
l.iincd by lour biinds 



< I.UKlfttr Koulc 



jJOne ol ihc iii.ii\\ li.inds ih.il peiloiined 
ai Forl)es Fesi was "Fi;o Trip ' Forbes 
Fi'st has beidiiu' known as a popular, 
end of the year band festival ihrouvh- 
oiii (.iinpiis 



30 



Student L 







-Claudette Roulo 



Jell-0 Snarfing 




/Kt Forbes Fest 




resident in Forbes 
Hall, I would not 
have missed it for 
the world." 



ne drizzling Saturday afternoon, on April 29, 1995, hun- 
dreds of students joined in wiiat was recognized as the 
third annual Forbes Fest celebration. Forbes Fest, which 
was originally created by former Forbes Hall resident 
advisors, has become known as a popular, end-of-the- 
year band festival throughout campus. The celebration 
consisted of several local bands, carnival games and 
prizes and of course, food for all. □ The festival 
proved to be a roaring success despite a few insurmountable problems. First, 
the weather was not looking out for the students' best interest. Six bands were 
scheduled to play, but due to the rain, only four decided to "brave the ele- 
ments." □ Karyn Carlton, sophomore in LAS, said, "Even though I was not 
there for very long, I had a great time listening to the bands 

perform, especially Ego Trip." Local bands included Ego Trip, AithOUah I I/1/C7S 
Free Range Chicken, The Hinleys and Slap Jaw. . 

Robin Misora, previous Forbes Fest staff member and former //t/ /C/l/^t-i U 
U of I student, stated, "Forbes Fest would have had an even 
greater turnout had the weather been nicer. The bands there 
were enthusiastic and everyone seemed to be enjoying 
themselves." □ Location was the other barrier which 
failed to put a stop to the on-going jubilation. That year, 
Forbes Fest was held in a smaller, more contained setting. 

□ Michelle Hacker, junior in CBA and vice president of 
Forbes Hall explained, "In previous years, the festival was held across from 
Forbes Hall in a large, open area. In 1995, however, due to construction, it was 
held in the courtyard between Forbes and Hopkins. Still, this did not limit the 
people from joining in on the celebration." □ The preparation involved in 
making the event so enjoyable took time and effort from many different peo- 
ple. The committee for planning the day's activities included five staff mem- 
bers, five students residing in Forbes Hall and many more than willing volun- 
teers. Forbes Hall Council was in charge of asking bands to perform and seeing 
if local restaurants would sell food to students at discounted rates. In 1995, 
McDonald's was generous enough to staff the food booths. □ Lastly, the 
council, along with several other volunteers, organized the games and activities 
for the students to enjoy. These games included Jell-0-snarfing, Kool-Aid chug- 
ging, a game of tug-o-war between the men and the women (the girls won) and 
the ever-popular dunk tank which contained those "hated" resident advisors. 

□ Forbes Fest proved once again to be a great source of entertainment for 
all students. Misora felt that Forbes Fest was probably the reason Forbes Hall 
won the honorary title of "Hall of the Year." □ Hacker summed it up best 
by saying, "Although I was no longer a resident in Forbes Hall, 1 would not have 
missed it for the world." 



story by Anne Peterson 
layout by Colleen Christensen 



".'1 




Forbes Fest 



31 



■-i&i.- 



Bid Farewell 



* \ ^4 



U of I Gr^du^tes 



//ri''',''. . 



^^H^^IH^^^I niversity of Illinois President Stanley Ikenberry kept up 
I V W ^H ^^^ tradition of tipping his cap to the graduating class, as 
I II ^^k he did in May to the class of 1995. His commencement 

I II ^^k speech was his farewell speech to the class as well as the 
I II ^H University of Illinois. 1 it was only fitting that when 

I ^L^ ^H former NBC anchorman John Chancellor was unable to 
^^^^^^^^^^r give the commencement speech due to illness, President 
Ikenberry was able to fulfill these honorable duties at 
the 124th Commencement at the U of I. The theme of pride and tradition rang 
through the rafters of Assembly Hall while its most recent graduating class spent 
its final moments at the university. 1 Babette Hiles and Maria Carr took 
over the responsibilities of putting together the commencement ceremony. The 
ceremony was not too different from past commencements, but that was to be 
expected. This year's committee wanted to focus on the tradition of the "Pomp 
and Circumstance," the unity of the black graduation caps 
and gowns and the harmonious voices of the graduates 
WQS not only on «•"§'"§ "Hail to the orange." G Carr, co-chairperson 
,. ^ of the ceremony, stated that "the overall pomp of the cere- 

fZl lUiny UJ Illy mony is amazing. The expression of joy from the students 
gave me the chills. The ceremony took a full year to put 
together, but it was all worth it in the end. It was a great pro- 
duction." 1 President Ikenberry's speech made a pos- 
itive impact on the students. "Even though John Chancellor, 
the intended speaker, was unable to show up, I was happy 
that the president spoke because he was leaving the univer- 
sity just as we were," said Maggy Ng, 1995 graduate in 
Agriculture. "His speech left a positive impact on me." 1 
Ikenberry focused on the hope and the pride of a graduating 
college student. He told the students that he would be leav- 
ing with these same two emotions. "1 Four honorary 
degrees were awarded at the commencement. John 
Chancellor and Hachiro Koyama both received an Honorary 
OnVthinO " ^^'^^^^ ^^ Doctor of Human Letters, and Edwin G. Krebs and 
-^ -^ William J. Rutter both received an Honorary Degree of 

s Commencement was a culmination of the academic 
year that recognized the graduates' accomplishments. It was meaningful to stu- 
dents, faculty and families. While o*'ier college campuses are straying away from 
the traditional ceremony, U of I had kept the orange and blue pride alive. 1 
Jenny Chiarito, 1995 graduate in Agriculture, summed up graduation by saying, 
"The ceremony was not only an ending of my college career, but also a beginning 
of my new life ahead. By making it through four years at U of 1, I now know thai 
I could accomplish anything." 

story by Adam Slahor 
layout by Aniaia Rozgus 



'The ceremony 



college careen but 

also a beginning 

of my new life 

ahead. By making 

it through four 

years at U of I, I 

now know that I 

could accomplish 

]ing. " 

Doctor of Science. 



-J-' 



32 



STUDENT Life 






■ 



-Paul Crano 



(i Graduates of the class of 1995, Suzzane 
Adams and Bill Corrough, ham it up outside 
Smith Memorial Hall. The university held a 
general commencement ceremony as well 
as individual college ceremonies. 

J, Gov. Jim Edgar spoke to the graduates at 
the 1995 commencement ceremony. Stanley 
Ikenberry was the commencement speaker, 
taking the place of John Chancellor, who 
became ill and could not attend. 



-Paul Crano 



Commencement 



pif 



Anything Goes 



/\t Open IVlie ISIight 









''Some of those 

people were so 
talented and this 

gave them the 

opportunity to go 

up on stage and 

perform. If this 
wasn't available a 
lot of these artists 

would not have 

the opportunity to 

do so." 



^^^^^^^^^^^H n and around campus there was always something for 
I ^^ ^^M students and faculty to do. There was dancing, going to 

I MM ^H concerts, the theater or just hanging out having a good 
I ■ I ^H time in the bars. However, there were two other oppor- 
I I I ^H tunities of fun that only a select number of people 
I %. J ^H knew about. These events were called Open Mic Night, 
I ^^ ^^ and here was where you could let it all out! □ 

Starting with the first Open Mic Night, it was held at the 
T.l.S. Bookplate Cafe on Sixth Street in Champaign. Here, students, faculty or 
other Interested people could get up in front of a microphone and spill their 
heartfelt feelings in front of an audience. Some would read their favorite 
poems or stories written by another author or themselves. Some even read 
their works that were still under construction. □ Mainly a book and poetry 
reading night, Cornelio Casaclang, the person who was "more or less" the one 
in charge, said, "Anything goes. It just depends on who 
comes in." □ The atmosphere in the corner room was 
cozy and comfortable with a long, multi-colored couch, a 
small, old-fashioned wood burning stove and books sur- 
rounding you from every direction. Also, if you were hun- 
gry or were craving a drink you could easily walk up a ramp 
toward the counter and order a croissant and a cup of cof- 
fee. These evenings of comfort and relaxation were held 
every Wednesday at 7 p.m. and usually would last about an 
hour. Being sponsored by The Issue and T.l.S Too!, the per- 
formers courage and artistic abilities were usually reward- 
ed with 20 percent off any purchase in the bookstore that 
night, be it food, calendars or books. □ The other Open 
Mic Night was held at the Courtyard Cafe in the lllini Union 
every other Wednesday. This night had a slightly different 
atmosphere. Here there was a lit stage, light and sound 
technicians aiding in the setup of the show, and performers 
had to reserve a space on stage for that night ahead of time. 
Many more musicians would perform here compared to the 
night held at T.l.S. Music was not the only thing that filled 
the air. There was also dancing, poetry, stories and jokes. □ Both evenings 
provided a wide diversity of cultures, beliefs and lifestyles. Christopher 
Gauthier, senior in LAS, stated, "Of all the acts 1 have seen, the lesbian poetry 
made the greatest impact. It (that style of poetry) is something one does not 
encounter everyday." C\ There were many more acts seen that represented 
the wide range of cultures. One was a pair of musicians that sang a ballad in 
their Indian language. Another act that stood out was an African-American male 
doing an African song and dance. Not only did these evenings provide views 
and feelings of different people and cultures, it also provided a place for every- 
one to go relax and listen to artists perform for free. D Casey Madsen, junior 
in Engineering, said, "Some of those people were so talented and this gave them 
the opportunity to go up on stage and perform. If this wasn't available a lot of 
these artists would noi h.ivc the opportunity to do so." 

story by Kristen Breiinan 
layout by Lisa Whitenack 



34 



STUDENT l-IFE 





I^Sam reads his poem 
"Combustion" at Open 
Mic Night. His style 
was recieved well by 
his peers. 



-Paul Crano 



\\ A participant of an Open Mic Night express- 
es himself through his vocal talents at the 
Courtyard Cafe in the lllini Union. 
Musicans were among the many perform- 
ers at Open Mic Night. 







Open Mic Night 



35 



Cult Satus 



Rocky Horror Loses 



•'■■:'-K" 



7 was definitely 

overwhelmed. The 

crowd was very 

artistic, very open, 

and liberal. . . 

something that 

Newt Gingrich 

should definitely 

come to." 



■■'■M 



^m^l^HI^^I he Rocky Horror Picture Show" was "born" in 197^, but 
^^m ^1 the cult phenomenon it grew into was created in 1978. 
■ ^^ Big cities and campus towns everywhere have at least 

I ^1 one alternative theater which will feature "Rocky 

• I ^B Horror" at midnights on weekend nights. The Art 

^^^ I ^1 Theater in downtown Champaign has been both 

^^^H^P^^^^^T delighting and confusing U of 1 students since 1989 with 
its weekly "Rocky" showings. Why did one of the 
strangest movie musicals ever made become the ultimate camp-cult midnight 
film experience? □ "Rocky Horror Picture Show" (and not because of the 
film either) was the first multi-media experience, not because of the computer, 
but because of the audience participation. 3 Cult fans went to the film hun- 
dreds of times, memorized the dialogue, improvised their own responses to it 
and brought the requisite props with them — the rice, the toast, the water guns, 
the toilet paper — to throw and shoot at each other at the 
required points in the movie. It was true performance art, 
with participants often dressing like their favorite charac- 
ters and giving their own spotlight performance. ~i It 
was the third time for Melissa Blickem, sophomore in LAS. 
"We all sat up in front and you stood up and said your 
name. They made you yell it louder, until you were excep- 
tionally loud. Everybody called you a slut. . . we had a best 
underwear contest. But they didn't force it upon you like 
they did tonight." She attributed the change to the regulars 
doing a little more to enliven the proceedings due to a 
smaller crowd. □ Other students were there for the first 
time, and were not pleased. Sarah Haworth, junior in 
Education, said, "1 didn't really enjoy it. 1 thought they were 
rude in the beginning when they made me stand up and 
tried to get me to kiss a girl." O Meredith Welsch, junior 
in Communications, found it interesting, but not interesting enough to go back 
a second time. "1 was definitely overwhelmed. The crowd was very artistic, very 
open, and liberal. . . something that Newt Gingrich should definitely come to." 
O For the people who work at the Art, the experience was not always so 
pleasant, either. ^ Colin Lamkin, an Art Theater employee and fomer 
Parkland University student, hated working the nights they showed "Rocky 
Horror Picture Show." □ "The audience participation is not so great. I have 
to clean up their mess, and they're a messy bunch of kids," Lamkin said. He did 
not mention whether having the water from the water-guns helped clean up the 
rice and swarms of toilet paper. □ Tom Angelica, general manager of the 
Art Theater, stated, "Videotape destroyed a lot of the mystique and people just 
don't understand the participatory aspect of it." ~l Whether its because of 
its introduction on videocassette, or because of increasingly rabid and rowdy 
fans, "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" phenomenon is most likely coming to 
its camp demise. Will there be another camp film to take up the torch^ Only 
time and the changing tastes of the 21st century will tell. 



story by Stephen Wunderllch y^ 

layout by Ki istinn Castillo £ 

•3 

y 



36 



Student Life 




ll Theatrical actors of "The Rocky Horror 
Picture Show," Areina Templar, Dan 
Harris, Becky Painter and Mike Davella 
of Champaign, perform a scene from 
the infamous 70s cult movie. 



t 



[^Friday night natives Dan 
England, Becky Griffith and 
Melissa Williams light their 
lighters in honor of one of the 
many audience performed 
skits at the Champaign Art 
Theater. 



Caria Schoepfle 



I^The star of the show 
""Frank-n-ferter," played 
by Dan Harris, struts his 
stuff for the audience at 
a midnight show on a 
Friday night during the 
fall semester. 




' r% ' — "-^ — "^ — ^^T'"? — -•? "^ ■■■ ^^^ 




Volunteer lllini Projects holds a meeting in 
hopes of recruiting new volunteers. As one 
of the largest student-run organizations on 
campus, VIP recruited dedicated volunteers 
to help in 12 different service areas. 




I JVolimlceis diMiiss piojeils lo hcviin work 

inv; on VIP v\,is loiiiuled l)\ iiiiimmmi^ mu 
dents iind beciime .in ollui.il non lor piol 
II III v;.ini/.iiuin in md^ 



38 



Student Life 




Mobilization 

Of eOO X/olunteers 




-Paul Grano 



espite the stereotypical image of the college student 
who was too busy to be concerned with issues outside 
the classroom, Volunteer lllini Projects (VIP) rounded 
up approximately 600 student volunteers this year. As 
one of the largest student-run organizations on campus, 
VIP recruited dedicated volunteers to help in 12 differ- 
ent service areas. □ The blood program and Nite 
Rides were two of the larger projects requiring mass 
volunteer efforts. Held in conjunction with the Champaign County Blood Bank 
and the American Red Cross of Peoria, monthly blood drives were held at the 
lllini Union. Also a well-publicized service, Nite Rides provided transportation 
to university students late at night as an alternative to walking home alone. □ 
Founded by university students, who provided a tutorial service to Champaign- 
Urbana area schools beginning in 1963, the group expanded 
and more services were offered when VIP became a non-for- 
profit organization in 1965. Since then, other service projects 
were developed covering a wide range of areas such as Best 
Buddies which fosters friendship between persons with men- 
tal retardation, daycare, friendship with elementary school 
children, health needs, hunger and homelessness, recre- 
ation, senior citizens, special projects and tutoring. □ 11100111^6 uUU StU 
VIP chairperson Christopher Ramirez, senior in FAA, took an 
interest in the smaller projects this year. "I tended to favor 
the smaller projects because they were more focused," 
Ramirez said. "In the smaller projects, the project directors 
and the volunteers could have follow-up meetings and talk 
about what they did in a more tightly-knit setting." □ 
Discussions promoting education were one of the goals of 
VIP this year. According to Ramirez, some of the smaller pro- 
grams of approximately 30 volunteers helped to promote 
awareness on important social issues such as hunger and 
homelessness. Other goals involved cultivating VIP leaders by providing skills- 
training, doing more campus wide efforts such as promoting all-volunteer orga- 
nizations on campus and teaching people how to sponsor their own volunteer 
groups □ "It was not only important that we educated ourselves but also 
other students and people in the community," Ramirez said. "A lot of knowledge 
came from the experience that the programs provide." □ VIP vice-chairper- 
son Paul Foppe, junior in LAS, expressed similar views and attributed the suc- 
cess of the service programs to the creativity and energy of its members □ 
"It was really amazing that we could come together and mobilize 600 students 
in the community," Foppe said. "People were really dynamic and had a wide 
range of experience." □ Over the years, VIP had been recognized for its 
commitment to helping others. The organization received recognition by Ronald 
Reagan through the President's Volunteer Action Award. It had also received 
positive feedback from the community. □ "I really encourage everyone out 
there to participate in this," Foppe said. "It really adds to the education you 
receive at the university and opens your eyes to a lot of things." 

story by Sheowting Lu 
layout by Jill Kogan 



It was really 
amazing that we 
could come 
together and 



dents in the com- 
munity. People 
were really 
dynamic and had 
a wide range of 
experience." 



Volunteer illini Projects 



39 



Shining Stars 



Kr^nnert Pisplstys 




'We are trying to 

do a variety of 

things in a variety 

of styles. We are 

trying to balance 

the types of plays 

that are performed. 

We think about 

what type of 

experiences we 

want to provide 

for the students." 



his past year's theater schedule for Krannert Center for 
the Performing Arts could be described in two words: 
unusual and exciting. D Each year, Krannert had the 
responsibility of enticing U of I students as well as the 
community of Champaign-Urbana. Choosing plays that 
attracted the students in the Performing Arts 
Department was the main goal of the directors at 
Krannert, since the plays were performed as a prepa- 
ration of what was to come in the future for the students. G "We are try- 
ing to do a variety of things in a variety of styles. We try to balance the types 
of plays that are performed. We think about what type of experiences we want 
to provide for the students," stated Robert Knight, the head director of the 
Repertory Theatre. □ The Playhouse season opened on Oct. 6 with Alan 
Ayckbourn's topical comedy "Henceforward." It was a high-tech, futuristic play 
about living in a run-down neighborhood in London. 
"Henceforward" showed off what Krannert Center could do 
technologically. □ Marc Nestor, sophomore in LAS, 
viewed this play and stated, "It was excellent. Krannert por- 
trayed the play excellently by using both audio and video 
technology." O Robert Schenkkan's "The Kentucky 
Cycle," which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1992, opened on Oct. 
28. It was an epic of three families living in eastern 
Kentucky. It was the culmination of nine separate plays 
performed over two evenings. □ Luigi Pirandello's 
"Right You Are If You Think You Are" opened on Nov. 10. It 
dealt with the difference between truth and reality. It was 
an intriguing comedy about provincial Italians at the turn of 
the century. Neighbors of an Italian family become 
obsessed with finding out what was true about the family. 
G Sophie Treadwell's "Machinal" was the next play to be 
performed by the Illinois Repertory Theater. It opened on 
Feb. 7. It was an older play about a woman who murders 
her husband. It dealt with how people were turned into 
machines from working with machines on the job. The 
woman in the play was the first woman to be executed in the United States. O 
William Shakespeare's "Measure for Measure" opened on April 5. It was a clas- 
sical play that dealt with the tension between sexual promiscuity and moral 
constraint. G James Berton Harris, the managing director and costume 
designer at Krannert said, "I am most looking forward to this play because it is 
so fascinating and because I am working with designing the costumes." □ 
These were just a few of the plays that highlighted the i99i;-96 season at 
Krannert. Krannert was known for trying to keep a balance of interest through- 
out the season, trying to perform well-known plays, as well as lesser-knowti 
plays which will educate both the audience and the stiicleiiis. This year was no 
exception. 

story by Adam Slahoi 
layout by Lisa Whitenack 



Lft 






-ryr 




iJSallle Biggs, played by 
Libya V. Pugh. confronts 
Jed Rowen, in "The 
Kentucky Cycle." The 
epic consisted of nine 
plays which took two 
nights to perform. 

I^Jed Rowen, from "The 
Kentucky Cycle", pleads 
to the audience. 
Krannert presents a vari- 
ety of plays to attract its 
patrons 




\\ In "The Kentucky Cycle". Betsy Brandt's 
character. Lallie Rowen. talks to her 
husband Jed Rowen. played by j. Jacob 
Bruce. "The Kentucky Cycle" won a 
Pulitzer Prize in 1992. 



-Paul Crano 




American Style 



The ClnstingG to 




ow do exchange students look at the U of I campus? We 
may see a classic American university, but it was quite 
interesting to learn how our foreign peers feel about it. 
They mentioned the Greek system, the way we meet on 
campus socially and the general American style we 
have shown them. □ British students found sever- 
al interesting comparisons to their home universities. 
Simon Annicchiarico, participating on a CBA exchange 
with City University, London, saw the popularity of the Greek system as the 
most interesting difference □ "My campus had a student union with sev- 
eral bars," said Annicchiarico. "This allowed us to meet in a central place and 
we really did not need to organize our social calendars like the Greeks did." 
□ Nick Beare, participating in a CBA exchange from Warwick University in 
England found life at the U of 1 very different from what he was used to. Beare 
was confused by "mansions with strange Greek letters," but 
DQCK riOrn6 \NQ. after a while he found the point of it. "I found it strange 
\Mr\t t\ri nr\ r\t t^ fr\y n ^^^^ some of the most attractive girls on campus all had 
\l\l\JKAl\A \^\J kJUL JKJI W three Greek letters on their jumpers (that's "sweatshirt" in 
Dint with friends ^^^ Queens English)." □ U of Is campus town, the 

on a regular basis. 
I must confess that 



I missed the social- 
izing in a pub at 
lunch time, but I 
will never miss the 
British closing time 
of eleven o'clock." 



series of bars that is popular on weekends, marked anoth- 
er cultural difference between British and American uni- 
versity life. □ David McLaughlin, a Northern Irish stu- 
dent from Manchester University in England, noticed that 
the lack of a central meeting place at American universities 
changed the way people spent their time. □ "Back 
home we would go out for a pint with friends on a regular 
basis," McLaughlin said. "1 must confess that 1 missed the 
socializing in a pub at lunch time, but 1 will never miss the 
British closing time of eleven o'clock," added McLaughlin. 
□ Luca Saggioli, at the U of 1 on a computer engineering 
exchange from University of Bologna in Italy, found a sep- 
arate culture shock about our campus. D "My univer- 
sity was a series of buildings that were the functional part 
of the campus," said Saggiolo. "Unfortunately we did not have a student union 
or anything so nice as the Quad. It was good to use student privileges like going 
to IMPE and such things." □ It was interesting that the British students 
compared our U of 1 with their student unions while the Italian and other 
Europeans students were happy with the centrality of the Quad and a proper 
campus atmosphere. O Asian exchange students gave us another perspec- 
tive about our campus. Jin Byung Ahn was pleased with general American cul- 
tural aspects. "The people here at this university were very friendly to me and 
were very nice, " Ahn said. "1 found English to ije difficult because 1 studied ii 
(or only three years. I enjoyed meeting my classmates on ihe campus or at the 
student union." □ This was just a little glimpse of the U of 1 in the eyes ol 
its foreign classmates. It just shows that some of the things that we do not think 
twice about, others may see as very strange. 





story by Timothy Shen 
layout by Colleen Christensen 



42 



STUDENT LIFE 




II 




11 To escape from the daily pressures of 
school, foreign exchange students enjoy a 
beer and experience the American social 
life. Foreign exchange students found many 
comparisons to their universities back 
home. 



\\ A group of foreign exchange students 
live It up and enjoy their freedom at 
their hotne away from home. U of Is 
campus town, the series of bars that is 
popular on weekends, marked another 
culture difference between British and 
American university life. 



-Peter Mackay 



Foreign Exchange Students 



43 



Walk In the Park 



Students "TaRe /\ 




n July 17, 1941, Arthur C. Williard, president of the 
University of Illinois, received a letter from Robert 
Allerton, a man who U of 1 faculty, students and alum- 
ni would remember for the rest of their lives. In this 
letter, Allerton asked Williard if the university would 
welcome the donation of the Allerton Estate, common- 
ly referred to as the park. "1 In 1942, the universi- 
ty received the gift of the park to be a place for educa- 
tion, business and recreation. Since then, Allerton Park opened itself to any- 
one who wished to relax in the gardens, hike through the forests or admire the 
sculptures and statues. The university, local and state government groups and 
businesses held conferences, meetings and classes there. ~1 Within the 
park, the gardens are full of different types of flowers, bushes and sculptures. 
One garden, called the Fu Dog Garden, consisted of Chinese Fu Dog sculptures. 
,, The dogs were purchased from American and European 

it WUj yfizUL artists. Another well-known statue was located about one 

fhipfP \MPYP "^''^ '^'^^"^ ^^^ Allerton home, better known as the manor. ~1 

On a barely visible plate, one could read the name of this 
aW XllQSQ. famous statue, "The Death of the Last Centaur." It stood 112 
V^i^^^y^ ryr\/-\\^r '"'^'^^^ ^^"^ ^""^ '^ S^^^ ^^^ ^^^ inspiring feeling, due to its 
I If CiLICI I I l\J\Ji\j awesome size and detail," said Christopher Gauthier, junior in 
(JKlH CrOnniP^ ^^' "* However, there was another statue that students 
gave high ratings to. According to Karthikeyan Gandhi, senior 
yUU COUlU QO in CBA, and Robert Speek, senior in Engineering, the statue of 
/^v-t/^ ■fjr-t/H " ^^^ ^"" Singer" was their favorite. Located in the middle of 
J ' a large circle of grass surrounded by the forest, it stood 147 

inches high. If one stood in front of him at a certain time of the day, you might 
have been lucky enough to see him hold the sun in his outstretched arms. "1 
For students, Allerton held many advantages. It was a place to get away from 
classes for a while and relax in the sun for free. ~\ "It was the most beau- 
tiful patch of woodlands in the midst of cornfields," said Gandhi. "1 The 
park also held a full day of things to do. "It was great — there were all these 
hidden nooks and crannies you could go and find," said Speek in agreement. 
~1 One of the greatest things about Allerton was that you could do almost any- 
thing you wanted to. You could lay out and catch some rays, pick a hidden spot 
and have a picnic or bring the dog for a walk. "1 Amongst all of this fun, it 
was still inevitable that you would also learn something. Just from walking 
among the gardens, you could learn about the sculptures. Also, if you went into 
the visitor's center, there were pictures of the original buildings, stories about 
the Allerton family and the hundreds of people invited into the Allerton home. 
The park was being used for education, business and recreation, the soul wish- 
es of Robert Allerton. 

story by Kristen Brennan 
layout by Colleen Christensen 





■ADtH»OO»lit0MMK»lttKKlt M »a, 





~j Robert Allerton's mansion, now used as a 
conference center, sits near the parks vis- 
itor's center. The conference center can be 
rented out for meetings, workshops or 
other events. 

^ Several statues are scattered throughout 
Allerton Park. This statue can be seen just 
outside the Sunken Garden, one of the 
most beautiful parts of the park. 

rj Allerton has several miles of trails for visi- 
tors to enjoy. There are also picnic areas, 
gardens, a conference center and a visi- 
tors' center. The park is open throughout 
the year for visitors. 



-Paul Crano 



P 



-Paul Grano 



■Paul Crano 



Allerton 45 



%\ 



s 



Scooby-Doo 

Is Si Retro "Thing 

^^^^^^^^^^^H r keeping up with the fast moving fashion of the 1990s 
I H ^H was too difficult, the safest thing to do was to retreat 

I I ^H back to the era that most of us know best — the 1980s. 

I I ^1 As if being a student at U of I was not hard enough, now 

I I ^1 most of us are forced to actually think about whether 

I I - / ^H or not we are in style. Were those dreaded Greg Brady 

1 * ^r tight T-shirts coming back in style? And were those jelly 

shoes that girls used to wear back in fashion? On this 
campus, one never knew. □ it was feasible to bring back earlier fashions 
because college life tends to be expensive. So why not run to the nearest thrift 
store to buy a cheap Scooby-Doo T-shirt? □ Maggie Sather, sophomore in 
LAS, stated that this trend "was cool for a while, but stores capitalized on it. 
Now it was more typical than anything." □ This was true /^i» tM/^-.f ^ ni/~n 
because those Brady Bunch T-shirts that used to cost around VVLiJ Li llll_C 

$3 now cost around $15. One could blame this on teenage ChCHlOQ uOm ttlQ 
fashion magazines, which brought this type of fashion back 

into the mainstream. d Another look that recently Cyi Lll lUc lUUK. I llsZ. 
erupted on campus was the baby doll T-shirt look. Girls 
were also seen parting their hair in the middle and propping 
it up with two barrettes from their kindergarten jewelry 
box. While walking down the Quad, one could also see girls 
wearing clear jelly shoes from the mid 1980s. □ Sarah 
Barnes, junior in CBA, said, "it was a nice change from the 
grunge look. It was very feminine and sweet rather than the 
baggy look. The '80s was an era which reminded students of 
an easier time in their life when there was no pressure." □ 
There were students who felt that this look was unimagina- 
tive and should have remained back in history. □ Andrew Parker, junior 
in LAS, stated, "If there was an '80s revival, I would want it killed before it 
started." □ The U of I has such diversity and culture that each student has 
a look of his own. No matter if a student was wearing a gas station attendant 
shirt with a post office cap or a polo shirt with jeans from The Gap, each style 
was respected. The way that a person dressed said a lot about his personality. 



'80s was an era 
which reminded 
students of an eas- 
ier time in their life 
when there was 
no pressure." 



i. V'"" 



•■^f^r.'V 



'■♦.\. 



story by Adam Slahor 

layout by Heather Albright and Jill Kogan 



-Laura Boyle 






1B»^? 




80s RETRO 



47 



Afro Blue 



The F^shicDn of 



"VJe. need events on 
campus that 
primarily are focused 
on the prominent 
minorities, 
l-lomecoming is a 
time where African- 
American students 
can unite." 



0frican-American Homecoming was celebrated in grand 
fashion this year. Def Comedy Jam, which was a group 
of comedians invited from the HBO series, entertained 
a crowd at Lincoln Theater before the big homecoming 
dance at the iihni Union. □ The theme of African- 
American Homecoming usually celebrates and reflects 
upon the pride and heritage of the African-American 
race. This year, the homecoming committee wanted to 
take a different approach toward the theme. O The theme of the home- 
coming celebration was "Afro Blue: A State of Mind, A State of Being." Afro Blue 
was chosen from a song from the famous jazz recorder, John Coltrane. It orig- 
inated because the committee was trying to focus on a theme that represented 
what they believed to be the "black experience." The theme was a culmination 
of the calm and relaxing feelings represented by the color blue and Jazz music. 
O Brandy Winston-Johnson, chairperson of the dance and Junior in LAS, stat- 
ed, "This is the mind frame we wanted the students to be in." 
a African-American Homecoming caused a stir on the U 
of I campus because many students believed that it was 
racist because it was only open to African-Americans. This 
was one misconception about the event. Both Def Comedy 
Jam and the homecoming dance were open to all races. 
African-American students believe that a separate 
Homecoming celebration was needed because most campus 
events were geared toward the Caucasian students. O 
"The reality of it is that we are two totally different com- 
munities," stated chairperson, Casey Harris, senior in CBA. 
"It is inevitable that it will be looked at as separate, but it 
is necessary for the black students to have an event of their 
own. We need events on campus that primarily are focused 
on the prominent minorities. Homecoming is a time where 
African-American students can unite." O Both the Def Comedy Jam and the 
dance were huge successes and both sold out. The dance had to turn away 500 
people. Both events attracted large groups of alumni and family from the 
Chicago area. O The dance was catered and had photographers to capture 
those special moments. The homecoming committee was especially proud of 
having famous Chicagoland disc Jockey Pharris Thomas to DJ the dance. O 
King and Queen Isiah Lockhart, junior in LAS, and Monica Manson, senior in 
Agriculture, were chosen to reign at the dance. O African-American 
Homecoming was a time where students could have a night to remember for the 
rest of their lives. Marylyn Rogers, area coordinator of cultural events, stated, 
"It was a successful event. The Union is looking forward to having the event 
next year." 




story by Adam Slahor 
layout by Amara Rozgus 




-Paul Crano 

I I Two Afro Blue participants jam to the music 
at the African-American Homecoming. Isiah 
Lockhart, junior in LAS, and Monica Manson, 
senior in Agriculture, were the King and 
Queen presiding over this year's dance. 



-Paul Crano 



II A couple dance at the Alrican- 
American Homecoming held in the 
Ilhni Union. The turnput was so 
large that many people were 
turned away. 



Downtown Flair 



"The CZlybourne Has 



atmosphere of 



^^l^m^Hj^H magine this... A bar where everything was actually 

I M ^H handmade and hand painted, where the booths were 

I I ^H trimmed in copper and the tables were handmade and 

I I ^1 custom designed with wrought iron. Imagine a bar with 

I I ^1 a diverse menu ranging from vegetarian entrees to the 

I I ^1 run of the mill hamburger and fries and diverse musi- 

^^^^^^^^^^^r cal selections ranging from blues and jazz to rock and 

roll. Would you conclude that this bar was a club in 

Chicago? It was possible, but it was actually one of Champaign's very own. The 

Clybourne was the classy, new bar on Sixth Street. □ The bar is owned by 

Scott Cochrane, whose family also owns Cochrane's, CO. Daniel's and RSR's 

Sports Grill. Cochrane stated that he was "proud of how the bar has developed. 

It's beautiful. We are trying to create a different type of atmosphere than what 

,^ this campus is used to." □ The Clybourne had two lev- 

/ iL/VeU tllC els. Downstairs was the area where all patrons who are 

over age 19 are allowed. This part of the bar had a red and 

maroon motif, which gave it a rustic feeling. There was an 

Trie dVDOUrfie. °P^" ^^'^ ^^^ patrons who are at least 21. The walls were 

. - , /• , , hand torched with copper and custom designed lights hung 

lylyJ^*- t/y LI Ik, kJI I above the booths and the bar area. There was also valuable 

Cnrnnil^ tini'^ nt 1 1 memorabilia scattered throughout the bar, including a 

' booth from Coslow's, which was the restaurant where the 

Oj I ore UOrK OnCl St. LouIs Bread Company on John Street is now located. □ 

WiVfl/ hil li TH/D ^^ ^^" walked upstairs, the walls were hand painted. 

*■_// lJ^*- C. Colored Victorian couches and colored beads highlight the 

(^luhOUrne is CleOn ^°°"^' which has a blue motif. The upstairs section of the 

bar was smaller, but it was much more comfortable than 
many of the other on campus bars were. □ "I thought 
the upstairs part of The Clybourne was classy, " stated Jackie 
Gordon, senior in LAS. "It was cool to just sit on the couch- 
es and chill out with my friends." □ The patrons were 
of all ages, from 19 to 60 years old. Since everything in The 
Clybourne was hand done, it had a classier feeling than 
bars on most college campuses. This feeling gave it an 
atmosphere which compared to many downtown Chicago 
clubs. This made many of the students at U of I feel right at home. The 
Clybourne prides itself on its cleanliness and diversity. G Lawra Grabowski, 
senior in LAS, summed up the bar's atmosphere by saying, "I loved the atmos- 
phere of The Clybourne. Most of the on campus bars at U of 1 are dark and 
dirty, but The Clybourne is clean and pleasant. I also liked it because the art 
reminded me of a downtown club." 



story by Adam Slahor 
layout by Jill Kogan 



/, but The 

)ume is clean 

and pleasant I 

also liked it 

because the art 

reminded me of a 

downtown club." 





50 



Student Life 



' -lifiiiiisRAiwMc^ 




Paul Grano 



11 Various members of Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
fraternity and Kappa Delta sorority 
attend an exchange at the Clybourne. 
The classier atmosphere of the establish- 
ment was compared to clubs in Chicago. 



-Paul Crano 



(^The head bartender at The Clybourne col- 
lects cash for a drink. The great atmos- 
phere and furnishings are reflected in the 
$5 cost of a mixed drink. 



The Clybourne 



51 



Good Old Dad 



Li\/ing It Up With 




niversity of Illinois students were given the annual 
opportunity once again to make every daddy on cam- 
pus a king. □ Jeff Gordon, father of Marcy Gordon, 
senior in LAS, was crowned the official 1995 King Dad at 
the halftime of the football game. He was chosen based 
on an essay submitted by his daughter. The judging of 
the essays was done by the lllini Union Board. □ 
The most popular event throughout all of Dad's Day 
Weekend was the annual comedy show held after the football game. "The 
Tonight Show" host Jay Leno made Assembly Hall chuckle on Sept. 23, 1995, 
when he held a comedy show in honor of the annual U of I Dad's Day weekend 
festivities. Leno had also appeared at the U of 1 in 1977. □ "Of course, the 
best thing about the entire weekend, although 1 really enjoyed Jay Leno, was 
just being able to spend time with my daughter at her new 
apartment, " said Bob Fleischer, father of Claire Fleischer, 
junior in LAS. □ The opening act for Leno was a pianist, 
whose purple hair left the crowd wondering if he would 
break into a parody of some sort during one of his four 
pieces. G "The chuckling didn't start full speed until 
about the middle of the show," Geoff Ellis, junior in CBA, 
said. "1 could never forget the story he told; When he was 
a child his mother had asked him to go to the store to get 
some napkins because his family was having company for 
dinner. For whatever reason, a 7-year-old Leno arrived 
home with a box of feminine napkins' and proceeded to 
Qul6 to SP^nO tim^ pass them out to the dinner guests, never comprehending 
iA/i4-hi fvii / W/^l i/nht-frtf ^^^ °" earth his mother would make him do such a thing. " 
Wlin my UUUynikir ^ ^^^j ^^^ nipside to that wonderful fatherly aspect of 
Ot h^r n6]A/ ^^^ vveekend was that the dads were pulled in to TIS or lUB 
,, to blow money on their children. They bought unnecessary 
Cit/C/i LI / ICi It. items such as new lllini wardrobes for their daughters. G 
Other weekend festivities included a Dad's Association 
reception on Friday evening where King Gordon was crowned, a party on 
Saturday also sponsored by the Dad's Association and a concert for the dads 
performed by the Varsity Men's and Women's Glee Clubs at Krannert Center for 
the Performing Arts. 

story by Kristina Castillo 
layout by Amara Rozgus 



"Of course, the 

best thing about 

the entire 

weekend, 

although I really 

enjoyed Jay Leno, 

was just being 





oMUMCmtmotannK 



ll The crowning of King Dad took place at the 
halftime of the football game. Jeff Gordon 
was named the King Dad. 





[J Shopping with dad is always a popular 
pasttime. These folk are spending all of 
their money at one of the local bookstores. 



\\ A daughter and her dad go out for a beer. 
Weekends with dad were always treasured 
by U of I students. 



HVn/^St^ 



^'§^ 



-Paul Crano 



n 



o 



The grassy Quad offers a soothing place to 
relax and talk. These two students are able 
to ignore the noise and movement around 
them and enjoy a few moments of peace 
together. 



Being so used to napping on desks at class, 
this student uses a desk in the lllini Union 
to catch a few Z's. Other students tend to 
find the chairs and sofas to be more cozy. 




-Ptiul Cr.mii 

I I The South Lounge of the Union provides ,i 
quid atmosphere to relax, sleep or study 
This sludenl wisely uses some free time to 
keep up with his studies 




54 STUDENTl-IFE 



Mw ft /ftgiBia^&atitwiiwfc-. 





students Knead 

to Release TensicDn 



common problem for students on campus was how to 
relax. After a hard day of classes and homework, stu- 
dents needed a way to unwind all of their muscles and 
let their nerves relax. There were many ways to do this: 
sleeping, watching TV, eating, getting a massage, medi- 
tating, etc. All of these methods were used by students, 
but not all of these methods were good for us in the long 
run. Sleeping, getting a massage and meditating were all 
healthy ways to handle the stress of getting a higher education. Unfortunately, 
these are not always easy to do the right way. □ Quite a few students opted 
to sleep away their worries with little naps here and there. In order to get all 
of that late-night studying done, many students opted to nap 

away the afternoon hours. Others tried to get the same / IIK6 t/lC WUy I 
amount of sleep every night so that their bodies would have ^y-fw^ vy^nrlH-ni-n -fr^r n 
time to recharge after a particularly grueling day of classes. *-^' ^^ iwtt.^ 

Another sleep related relaxation technique involved loading \P\M tlliniltPS 011(1 
up on sleep during the weekends. However you chose to - i j i_ 

sleep during the past school year, it almost always relaxed L/C i c/CiAcCi fzi lUUyi I 
your body. □ Massage was a great way for over-stressed 
students to relieve some of the tension that had built up in 
their muscles. After a long day of walking to and from class- 
es many students were exchanging massages to ease their 
sore muscles. For those who did not know how to give massages, it was a diffi- 
cult relaxation skill to pick up. Although there was a shortage in structured 
massage classes, there were many "informal" instructions on the art of massage 
going on outside of classes. □ Another option for relaxation was medita- 
tion. This involved the focusing of the mind away from the real world to avoid 
the demands of the day. Meditation was done by many students who either did 
not have the time to sleep or a partner to massage them. □ "I like the way 
I can meditate for a few minutes and be relaxed enough to go back to work," 
said Deepak Dass, junior in LAS. □ Unfortunately, meditation, like mas- 
sage, was something that must be learned or practiced before it can be used as 
a relaxation method. Meditation was hardly as popular as massage, so there 
were few if any informal lessons. □ "Sometimes I put on some music and 
just listen for a few minutes without thinking about anything," said Robyn 
Sanderson, sophomore in FAA, of her personal relaxation technique. I~l This 
was a lot like meditation, except it involved music. Music was very important 
to students as a means of relaxing. □ Mike Brumm, senior in 

Communications, said of his technique, "Sometimes I sit in the dark and listen 
to music, and I may eat an occasional oatmeal cream pie." □ However it 
was that we relaxed, we survived it only a little worse for the wear. 




to go back to 
work. 




story by Ben Hoyle 
layout by Sara Cahill 



-Paul Crano 



Relaxation Techniques 



55 



•*• 









■M 



\g' 




\\ Cultural dances were some of 
the highlights of 1995's 
International Festival. Music 
and dance are a big part of 
many traditions, such as in this 
Korean dance. 



LU The Cultural Performance was thr 
finale to the International Festival. 
One of the dances was the 
Maglalatik dance, which portrayed a 
war between tribes. 




-Paul Crano 

II The exhibits at the 199, 
International Festival drew crowds 
from the university and the 
Champaign- Urbana community 
The exhibits wore locaicd m ihc 
mini Union. 




Cultural Awareness 




-Paul Crano 




"We feel that all 
different cultures 
are represented in 
l-Fest and feel that 



represented as 



he week of Nov. 13, 1995, was a week of celebration of 
different cultures. This year's theme was "Bridging the 
Distances Between Cultures for a Unified University." It 
was a week of events that showcased all the different 
types of cultures that are being represented on this 
campus. Normally, the International Festival consisted 
of a week of films, but now included other events such 
as "An Evening with Bobby Seaie" in which Bobby Seale, 
co-founder and former chairman of the Black Panther Party, gave a lecture in 
Foellinger Auditorium. d The week was also full of other events. The 
International Coffeehouse in the Courtyard Cafe exhibited Indian classical 
music. Films such as "Sarafina" and "Red Firecracker, Green Firecracker" were 
shown throughout the week. Fifteen groups and organiza- 
tions participated in the Cultural Exhibits and the Food Fair 
where traditions, cultures, clothing and food were displayed 
for anyone interested. □ Marylyn Rodgers, the lUB area 
coordinator of l-Fest and senior in Communications, said 
that the purpose of I-Fest was to bring a "sense of culture, 
broaden their minds," and "a good way to do that is through 
food and films." n Of the 15 groups who participated in 
the Cultural Exhibits, eight of them performed in the Cultural IndlU ShOUld L?^ 
Performances which was the finale to l-Fest. The Philippine 
Student Association (PSA) put on two of the performances. 
One was the Maglalatik dance which is "a dance portraying |/|/P// 
a war between two tribes over latik (coconut milk]," said 
John Joven, co-chair of the cultural committee of PSA and sophomore in LAS. 

□ The other performance was the Tinikling dance. In the Philippines there 
is a bird called the tinikling which is caught by bamboo traps. Joven said, "The 
dancers are portraying the birds by dancing in and out of 12 bamboo sticks." 

□ PSA participated in l-Fest because "music and dancing tells a lot about our 
history and what we've done today," reported Maggie Urian, advisor of PSA and 
senior in CBA. O The Indian Student Association (ISA) was another orga- 
nization that participated in l-Fest. At the Cultural Exhibits, the organization 
displayed pictures, the Indian literary magazine, books depicting Indian life, 
the flag and a map of India. Plus, for anyone who wished to sample Indian cui- 
sine, they offered samosas. ISA also had two performances for the Cultural 
Performances night. One was of children in the community singing, and the 
other was the Odyssey, a classical Indian dance. □ Madhn Goele, secre- 
tary of the executive board of ISA and sophomore in LAS, explained, "We feel 
that all different cultures are represented in l-Fest and feel that India should 
be represented as well." □ l-Fest, which began in the 1960s, unified dif- 
ferent cultural groups and organizations on campus. Planning for all of the 
events started in September to make this year's l-Fest as successful as those in 
the past. 

story by Suk Ju Yun 
layout by Amara Rozgus 



-Dave Moser 




International Festival 



57 



Alternative I 






We want the 



Finding /V Luncihtime 

^^^^^^^^^^^^M he university's dorm food was vetoed once again with 
I ^^M| ^H the opening of two new restaurants on campus. Both 
I ^^^ ^1 ^^"3 3"^ Bixby's Bagel Co. opened with a bang. □ 
I I ^H For beginners, bw-3, 606 E. Green St., made an opening 

I I ^H appearance on Saturday, Sept. 16, 1995. bw-3 was a 

I I ^H restaurant and sports bar. The "b" in bw-3 stood for 

I M ^^ buffalo while the three "w's" were wild, wings and 

week. Week, the restaurant's famous Kaiser roll used 
for most of the sandwiches, happened to be just one of the bw-3 food special- 
ties. The food was a combination of Western and Mexican as it ranged from 
buffalo wings and fajitas to salads and burgers. O Other than the restau- 
rant, bw-3 was a source of entertainment. The sports bar featured 16 small 
screen televisions and one large screen television, perfect for watching the 
Fighting lllini battle for victory. While upstairs consisted of the bar and eating 
area, downstairs was equally appealing. The basement featured four small 
screen televisions, several tables and counters, two billiard 
tables and two pinball machines. □ Bill Lane, general 
students to KnO]A/ ^lanager of bw-3, stated, "bw-3 's a place to come in and 
J.U, J. J.L%' X relax, eat some food and watch not only football, but all 

inUl ZniS yreUl kinds of sports." □ when walking into Bixby's Bagel Co., 
Y^\/1CP fri cfl irl\/ °"^ ^^^ greeted with a strong coffee aroma. Bixby's Bagel 
' ^ -' Co., located at 613 S. Wright St., opened its doors to many 

reiQX OnO OnnK O eager students on Thursday, Sept. 14, 1995. The restaurant 

was decorated comfortably, with brown and white checkers 
covering the walls. There were several tables and high 
counters, perfect for a little studying. □ The manager, Kris Miller, stated, 
"We want the students to know that this a great place to study, relax and drink 
a little coffee." □ Bixby's featured 15 different types of bagels such as choco- 
late chip, cinnamon raisin and poppy seed. There was soup du jour, chicken 
chili and seven kinds of salads. Also, Bixby's featured many kinds of gourmet 
coffees and espressos. Hot chocolate was also sold — popular among the stu- 
dents during the winter for warming up in between classes. □ Also, Bixby's 
had fresh baked muffins and cookies. Bixby's was also a great alternative for 
the on-the-go student. Bixby's featured a lunch box service. With an advance 
phone call, students could order a bagel sandwich of their choice, accompanied 
by potato chips, a cookie and a pickle spear. Lunches could then be picked up 
at the express counter. □ Jenifer Rovel, freshman in Education, stated, "I 
love the lunch box service because I never have time to pack a lunch. Also, this 
way I can avoid all those tempting fast food restaurants. " 

story by Anne Peterson 
layout by Amara Rozgus 



little coffee. 




58 "*^ ' Student Life 







I I Working behind the counter, 

Audrey Stein, junior in LAS, helps a 
customer make her decision. 
Bixby's featurs 15 different types of 
bagels such as chocolate chip, cin- 
namon raisin and poppy seed. 




^~<^- 



^W 



|j Wild, wings and week can be found 
at bw-} on East Green Street. Tom 
Lynch, graduate student, samples 
some of the wings. There are sever- 
al wing sauces to choose from; spicy 
garlic, honey mustard, sweet bar- 
beque and many others. 



-Laura Boyle 



BW-3 AND BlXRY'S 



59 



Helping Hands 



Students Lend 



'/.-"A 



Habitatfor 



J^K^^^^^^^^M (^'ih^ against poverty and homelessnesss was taking 
I M ^H place right here in Champaign-Urbana. For the last four 

I Ih ^I years, the local University of Illinois chapter of Habitat 

I ■ ■ ^H for Humanity worked toward providing affordable 

I 1^^ ^H housing for those who could not otherwise afford aver- 

I ^^^ ^H age housing costs. □ Erin Hayes, junior in LAS, stat- 
^■^^■^^^■^^^ ed, "Habitat for Humanity did not give houses to fami- 
lies, but rather worked with families to help build 
themselves a better life. It gave an opportunity to many who would not have 
one." □ The University of Illinois' members were involved throughout the 
entire process of building homes, beginning with financing and raising approx- 
imately $35,000 for each house. □ Brian McCloskey, junior in Engineering, 
who participated in one of the various annual fund raising activities, canning, 
where Habitat members ask the community for can donations, stated, "The 
majority of people were very willing to help. It was good to 
see that amount of support and interest in people for our 
HUmQtlltV did not organization and what we stood for." □ Habitat members 
, built their seventh student-built house during the fall semes- 

yiVki I lUUbiib LU ter. The houses were purely done on a volunteer basis. Not 
fntnilip^ Hi if trithPf °"'^ ^'^ ^^^ students give their time, but also their talent to 
J ' produce a home that provided more than just shelter. It pro- 

]A/0rK6U \A/ltri vided stability, hope and pride for the family as well as the 
r •!• I Irt I Habitat members who made it happen. □ Matthew Frank, 

JUI I IIIIKZj LL/ I l^HJ junior in FAA, said, "Not only did 1 enjoy working with all of 
llllild thPm^Pl\/P^ n ^^^ volunteers and families, but 1 developed a sense of satis- 
faction and pride from helping the community as I did my 
part in building the house." □ Students gained a great 
deal from this experience as the family did because they saw 
first hand the impact of their efforts on someone else's life. 
3 The university's chapter was fairly new. However, it 
made such a great impact, it could only be judged by merit. 
Students actually reached out and acted on something they 
strongly believed would make that difference. □ Jason 
Wyckoff, junior in CBA, stated, "In the past year and a half that I have been in 
Habitat for Humanity at U of 1, it amazed me to see what a bunch of college kids 
did for this community. With even more involvement. Habitat could go to even 
bigger and better places." H Habitat for Humanity made a lasting difference 
in many people's lives and helped fight the war on poverty and homelessness 
that plagues everyone in this nation. Talking about these problems did no good. 
Action was what caused change. Action was the solution. "I If you are ready 
to make a difference, join others in "building a framework for the future." 

story by Dawn Verest 
layout by Lisa \A/hitenack 



better life. It gave 
an opportunity to 
many who would 
not have one. 




»ENT LIFE 



^7 1 





Above the Norm 

Off-Catrnpus Bars Go 



hen somebody used to ask, "which bar did you go to 
last night?" the typical answer would have been CO. 
Daniel's, Kam's or Joe's. Things were changing on the U 
of I campus. Students were more diverse and would 
rather have spent time in a more relaxed atmosphere 
than the hustle and the bustle of on-campus bars. 
Nowadays, the answer to that question would be 
Chester Street, Gypsy, Blind Pig, Fat City Saloon and The 
Embassy, which were all off-campus bars located in Champaign and Urbana. 
□ Off-campus bars were a definite change in atmosphere for U of I students. 
Not only did students attend these bars, but teaching assistants, professors and 
Champaign-Urbana patrons frequented these bars as well. Off-campus bars 
focused on cleanliness, diversity and a relaxed atmosphere. They were typical- 
ly less crowded than an average on-campus bar. □ "Off-campus bars are 
not as crowded. They provide more of a relaxed environ- 
ment where I can go with my friends, hang out and have 
just a couple of beers. You can't really hang out in on cam- 
pus bars," said Natalie Romo, senior in LAS. □ One of 
the positive attributes of off-campus bars was the fact that 
one could really get to know who they met. In bars off 
campus, students were able to converse with all types of 
environment ]A/nere I people from an types of backgrounds. Off-campus bars have 

been described as liberal, open-minded and cultural. 
People simply had the intention of having fun at off-campus 
bars. □ Bob Stringham, junior in LAS, stated, "Off-cam- 
pus bars don't provide the meat market atmosphere that 
many other bars do, where you absolutely have to pick up 
on people. They are just a place to relax and have fun. " □ 
Chester Street, a liberal off-campus bar, provides an atmos- 
phere for everybody. It was most popular on Tuesday nights, which was "Disco 
Night. " It steamed up its mirrors, brought back blasts from the past and showed 
various videos from the 70s and 80s. It provided the most diverse atmosphere 
in Champaign-Urbana, with patrons ranging from teaching assistants to drag 
queens. It was also famous for having one of the best sound systems outside of 
Chicago. □ The Blind Pig was popular for having a different theme every 
night. Jim's Disco, Dead Night, blues and jazz were just a few of the students' 
favorites. It provided a large dance floor and a good sound system. □ "I 
like The Blind Pig because every time 1 go I actually meet people. My friends 
and I don't simply go to drink, but to dance and have a good time as well, " stat- 
ed John Nguyen, senior in LAS. □ If you want a change of pace from the on 
campus bars, visit one of Champaign-Urbana's many off campus bars, because 
you never know who you will meet or what you will see. 

story by Adam Slahor 
layout by Colleen Chrlstensen 



"Off-campus bars 

are not as crowded. 

They provide more 

of a relaxed 



can go with my 
friends, hang out 

and have just a 
couple of beers/ 




k^^ 




62 



Student LIFE 




IJ Gazing at the variety of beers, 
graduate student Todd Fell, relaxes 
after a hard day of classes. Off- 
campus bars were a definite 
change in atmosphere for U of I 
students. Not only did students 
attend these bars, but teaching 
assistant and professors frequent- 
ed these bars as well. 



1 



I I FAA senior Dave Moser chugs a 
beer at the Blind Pig, a popular 
Champaign bar. In bars off-campus, 
students were able to converse 
with all types of people from all 
types of backgrounds. Off-campus 
bars have been described as liber- 
al, open-minded and cultural. 



m 



\\ There is a variety of off-campus bars for 
the students to escape to when they 
become bored with the average night at the 
on-campus bars. The Blind Pig was popular 
for having a different theme every night. 
Jim's Disco, Dead Night, blues and jazz 
were just a few of the students' favorites. 



Sii.'SSiK.^ ->,^[-W»W > 



Infill lift ^•Sc^.iC'.t 



Off-Campus Bars 





-Peter Mackay 



[jRecieving the American and 
POW/MIA flags are members of Air 
Force ROTC Andrew Builta, sopho- 
more in LAS, Phillip Shea, junior in 
LAS, Scott Linck. junior in LAS, and 
Joanna Washburn, freshman in LAS. 
Air Force ROTC offers many oppor- 
tunities to the students involved in 
the program. 

\\ Members of the Army ROTC lower 
the flag in front of the Armory one 
afternoon while members of Air 
Force ROTC, Andrew Builta, sopho- 
more in LAS, Phillip Shea, junior in 
LAS, Scott Linck, junior in LAS, and 
Joanna Washburn, freshman in LAS, 
look on. joining an Armed Force 
gives students leadership skills that 
follow them through college and 
into the real world. 




-IVloi M.uk.iy 



Flying Above 



AKU the Rest 



"Air Force ROTC is 



^^H^^^^mi^H he ROTC programs at the university level were more 
^V M^fl ^1 than Just wearing uniforms on Thursdays, busy-duties 
B I ^H like raising and lowering the flag and climbing walls 

I I ^H outside of the Armory. It was dedication that came, in 

^k I ^H part, from the support behind you. It was working as 

^H I ^^M hard as you can knowing that you were working toward 

^^^^_^^^^^r ^ §°^' ^f^'y y^" could benefit from, a goal with the rest 

of America in mind. It was acheiving 
success through these things always with someone a step 
behind you and in front of you that you could lead on along Q tlfOOt'OtT] ttlOt 
the way. O "Air Force ROTC is a program that forges life- . t-r i 

long friendships and teaches a person about himself and oth- JsJlUKij IIJ(zlUl1U 
ers around him in a service environment that everyone in ffjonrlcHInC Htiri 
America can be proud of," stated Steven Moritz, Air Force ROTC -' i 

senior in Engineering. CI "I would not be a well rounded 
person if it weren't for my experiences. We had social events 
like hayrides and bonfires that we took friends and family to," 
Jason Knight, 1994 graduate, said. □ There are definite 
advantages in being in the ROTC programs. O "If it weren't 
for our cool planes, CNN would only show O.J. [Simpson]," said 
Matthew Budde, Air Force ROTC senior in Engineering. □ 
On a more serious note, though, base life is extremely serene. 
After four years of dedication, a cadet becomes a second leiu- 
tenant upon graduation [from the Air Force ROTCI and is sta- 
tioned somewhere they have most likely never been before. 
□ "The grocery stores are way cheap, and no civilians can 
get those priveleges. We also have our own movie theaters and 
department stores on base with the lowest discount prices I have ever seen," 
said Knight. C!) "Air Force ROTC was the most inspiring experience through- 
out my four years at the Univesity of Illinois. Leadership, pride and integrity 
were only a small fraction of the rewards the program gives cadets," said 
Elizabeth O'Malley, Air Force ROTC senior in LAS. 



story by Kristina Castillo 
layout by Amara Rozgus 




teaches a person 
about himself and 
others around him 
in a service 
environment that 
everyone in 
America can be 
proud of." 



Air Force ROTC 65 



M 



■i 



J 



[ j On Auv; i. i<)<)^. James J Siiikcl l)((<mic llic 
University of Illinois' i;ili presidenl Siiikel 
()l<ins lo <i((omplish ihree ijoals while he is 
presidi-nl hi( h of these ijoals will .iid I.k 
iilty, siciff iind stiidenls alike 




66 



Student Life 



Through the Eyes 



of James StLjRel 



jf^^^^l^^^^^H or the U of Is 127th birthday, it got a new president. James Stukel stepped 
I ■■ ^M up to fill Stanley Ikenberry's shoes on Aug. i, 1995. Stukel was chosen 

I I ^M among 100 other candidates. He was chosen by a board including faculty, 

I ^^ ^M staff and students. His outstanding qualifications put him well above many 

I ^^ ^M of the other candidates, including the president of the University of Utah, 

I I ^M his biggest rival. He was previously chancellor of the Chicago campus and 

I * W^ was the seventh president to be promoted within the U of 1 system. D 

Stukel was named the 15th president of the three campuses: Chicago, 
Springfield and Urbana-Champaign. He believes the campuses should cooperate, not compete. 
"They are complimentary, not competitive institutions," Stukel said. □ Stukel was no stranger 
to Urbana-Champaign. He spent 24 years in Urbana before moving to Chicago. He was an engineer- 
ing professor for seven of those years. □ "It's really a homecoming 
for me," Stukel said. "I'm now neighbors again with all my friends." □ 
Stukel and his wife, Joan, will reside in Urbana. They will be living in the 
U of I president's house, where Ikenberry spent the past 16 years. □ 
The new president has a tough act to follow. He must maintain and 
improve upon everything that Ikenberry was able to do with the universi- 
ty. □ Stukel said that Ikenberry will be "a difficult act to follow. " But 
Stukel already has several goals to accomplish during his presidency. □ DlQ (1011 t SQQ LllQ 
His first goal is to bring together the residents of Illinois. He said that com- 
munication is the key. □ '1 feel we need to re-establish a link with 
the people of Illinois," Stukel stated. "Most people don't see the quality in 
this university." □ His second goal is proper financial management. 

"We need efficient academic and business operations," he said. D Finally, Stukel wants to main- 
tain the undergraduate education. "The university will also focus on improving the undergraduate 
experience," Stukel said. □ He plans to accomplish this through the Discovery Program, which 
is geared toward freshmen. First year students will be offered the chance to take small classes so 
that student-teacher interaction will be a valuable experience. Discovery courses are offered in a 
wide range of interests - from dance classes to courses in chemistry. □ Overall, Stukel seem 
very confident and excited about the upcoming years. "The presidency of the University of Illinois 
is a very important responsibility that 1 take very seriously," Stukel said. 

story and layout by Amara Rozgus 



7/ee/ we need to 
re-establish a link 
with the people of 
Illinois. Most peo- 



quality in this 
university. 



-File Photo 



^wm^' 




James Stukel 



67 




—Peter Mackay 

I I Towing a U of 1 plane, Ronald Prus, senior 

in Aviation and Education, heads for the 
hanger at Willard Regional Airport, Many 
students found employment neccessary to 
supplement their financial aid, 

I I In the archery room at IMPE, Jamie Carr, 

junior in Engineering, shows Nate Stevens, 
senior in U\S, the proper shooting form. 
Jobs on campus could be found either 
through the student employment office or 
independent of the university. 




68 



Student Life 




■%" ^ 



>*W'^'. 



.^- 




Working Hard 




To Pay the Bills 



extra money - 



merit expenses. 



^^^l^^m^^^B hat would life at college be have been like without a 
■ ■ ■ ^H job? What would you have done without the hassles of 
III ^1 work, the schedule conflicts, the horrible co-workers? 

■ ■■ I ^H The majority of the college population may never have 

■ I If ^H known. Increased tuition costs and higher living costs 
II II ^^1 drove students across the nation's campuses to find a 
^ ™ ^^ r job to fill the financial gaps. □ Students at the U of 

I were no exception. There are several reasons a stu- 
dent needs a job these days. There are also many benefits to having a job 
throughout college. And there are several different options a college student 
has to choose from when looking for a job. □ The first option. Federal 
Work Study, was a need-based job offered with a student's financial aid pack- 
age. Generally, the student can pick from a variety of on- ^^ 

campus jobs. □ Paul Satterthwaite, senior in LAS, had / WOrK tOr tue 
worked at his job for four years. He was no longer on a 
Federal Work Study program this past year, but found his job 
through the program. □ "I was on Federal Work Study t)QSiCQllV beer 
when I started it, but I'm not anymore," said Satterthwaite. , , 

When his work study ended, he was hired as an hourly i//C/l/tfy Cl/lCf CijL'C// t 
employee. "I needed the cash to pay for school " □ Other 
campus jobs were available to students who did not fall into 
the need-based category. Many of these jobs range from ten to 12 hours and had 
flexible schedules to fit with the student's class schedules. Campus jobs have a 
wide range of opportunities. G Jamie Carr, junior in Engineering, worked 
M hours each week at two different jobs. At one job, he was the supervisor of 
the archery room at the Intramural Physical Education Building (IMPE). □ "I 
assisted people in the use of bows and the safety factors involved," said Carr. 

□ Another type of job that could have been found at the university's Financial 
Aid Office was considered an "off-campus job." Jobs in this area range any- 
where from house cleaning and child care to harvest help and environmental 
jobs. □ Jobs range from $4.25 (minimum wage) to $10 an hour. The majori- 
ty of the positions were in the $5 range, though. Certainly not enough to pay 
tuition. □ Most students worked for the spending money. "I work for the 
extra money — basically beer money and apartment expenses," said Brad 
Heuberger, junior in LAS. □ Ronald Prus, senior in Aviation and Education, 
had a loan to cover his main expenses. He also worked to supplement his loan. 

□ "Every last dollar counts," said Prus. □ Prus worked at Williard 
Regional Airport. He was responsible for parking and refueling the aircraft. □ 
"I handle the fuel and the airplanes for both the university and the public," said 
Prus. n Whether it was for personal expenses or for tuition and fees, a col- 
lege job definitely had its benefits. And if you know where to start, they are 
not that hard to find. After all, everyone else is working — why shouldn't you? 

story by Amara Rozgus 
layout by Jill Kogan 




-Paul Crcjno 



' Wy:' 



Student Employment 



69 



Mary Kay 

Get In "Touch'^A/ith '^ 







7 would never 

have imagined 

that I would be 

one of those 

women carrying 

those pink cases 

selling make-up. 

But that all 

changed when I 

was introduced to 

the product and 

fellin love with it" 



^^^^^^^^^^^H ost reactions include: Isn't that for old ladies? Are 
I H H ^^1 those the chicks in the pink caddys? □ Well, step 
I H II ^H aside because these ladies had class. And not just any 
I ■■ffl ^1 "^'^ss " classes. Independent Mary Kay Beauty 
I I ■■ I ^H Consultants hold classes and facials for women across 
I I W I ^1 25 different countries. □ Mary Kay Cosmetics has 
B ■WW ^^ been ranked as one of the ten best companies for 
women to work for. Based on data from 1994, of all the 
millionaires in the world, 97 percent were men. Of the 3 percent that were 
women, seven out of every ten women were successful because of Mary Kay. 
No other company, especially a direct selling company, had turned out so many 
women who became millionaires because of their work in the company. 
Women in Mary Kay are in business for themselves, but never by themselves, 
which is the company's motto. D Patricia Krencel, a U 
of I mom whose daughter is a junior in Education and also 
an independent star beauty consultant for Mary Kay in 
Chicago and on campus, said, "I am happy that my daughter 
is involved in such a successful company. I know she could 
not be taken advantage of by these women. She is outgoing 
and gregarious, and she is certainly no business major. She 
does it to help pay for her tuition, and I really think she 
enjoys making other girls feel as good as she does " □ 
Mary Kay has several positive sides — from money to glam- 
our to teaching business skills. □ 'Although it sounds 
silly, Mary Kay has made me feel a lot better about myself 
in terms of my appearance," said Monica Krowiak, junior in 
Nursing at the University of Illinois at Chicago. □ 

Independent Beauty Consultant Hilda Arenas, junior in ALS, 
said, "1 would never have imagined that I would be one of 
those women carrying those pink cases selling make-up. But 
that all changed when I was introduced to the product and 
fell in love with it." □ Ashley Baumgarther, also an inde- 
pendent beauty consultant through Mary Kay and junior in 
LAS, stated, "1 have to say that Mary Kay Cosmetics has changed my life. I start- 
ed using the products in March of 1995 and started to see the results within a 
month. I broke out less and could see a definite improvement in the texture of 
my skin. I went to some meeting with my step mom (who is a consultant) and 
fell in love with the company and the opportunities that it could offer me. I am 
now a Mary Kay Beauty Consultant and I love it." 

story by Kristina Castillo 
layout by Amara Rozgus 




t 



70 



Student Life 



■BiMi»MK MMU t iM a<lMe>»> 




\\ Concentrating, Anne Finley, sopho- 
more in LAS, pencils in her hps. 
Mary Kay Cosmetics offers a wide 
variety of colors and styles to suit 
each person. 






*■ ■■ '' 



-Peter Mackay 



\\ Placing a special cream on her face. Angel 
Lopez, junior in LAS, tries out a new beau- 
ty product. Mary Kay offers free training 
seminars for its clients and customers. 

1 I Worl<ing together. Angel Lopez and Tracy 

Davis, juniors in LAS, try out many new 
products in their home. Independent Mary 
Kay Beauty Consultants hold classes and 
facials for women across 25 different coun- 
tries. 



I. 



Mary Kay Cosmetics 



71 







■nT^' .^ J 


■1^ ' ^ 





-Paul Crano 



I I With a character from "Melrose 

Place" on the television behind 
them, Renee Brockman, junior in 
LAS, and Tina Trotier, graduate stu- 
dent, enjoy the drink specials at 
Kam's. Many followers of "Melrose" 
watch is religiously because of the 
treachery and intrigue. 



I I Many "Melrose" groupies get 
together to watch and discuss the 
show. Angel Prockovic and Don 
Coglianese. seniors in LAS, Renee 
Brockmann, junior in LAS, Tina 
Trotier, graduate student, and 
Maria Garza, senior in CBA, get 
together on Monday nights to 
socialize and keep up on the latest 
"Melrose" gossip. 

I I Seniors in Education Lisa Moore 
and Elisa Biancalana discuss the 
current episode of "Melrose Place" 
at Kam's. They watch "Melrose" ai 
the bar weekly 





72 



Student Life 





-Paul Crano 




Living the Fantasy 



On IVIelrcDse Place 




here's a new game in town Monday nights. And you do 
not even have to leave the comforts of home, though 
many prefer to play the game in packs. All you have to 
do is click your remote to the Fox network in the early 
evening hours. The phenomenon that is called "Melrose 
Place" leaps out at you with its murderous, backstab- 
bing, treacherous twists of fate. ~l Though the show 
has never been a top-rated hit, it succeeds in attracting 
the important age group of i8- to 34-year-olds. Not to mention that it has cre- 
ated a college cult following which threatens to exceed its cult-like status. □ 
Angharad Valdivia, assistant professor in media studies, said that the show 
caters to the twentysomething audience. "It involves contemporary patterns of 
sex and intrigue already familiar to its audience," Valdivia said. "It's riveting, 
seductive, yet formulaic." L) College of Communications 
senior Michelle Darrow watches the show religiously. ""It's 
for the escapism. I do not live my love life like the beautiful 
and glamorous folk," Darrow said. "And I'm glad I don't have 
to live a life like that. But I like to watch it." □ The cult- 
like trend has caught on all over the U of 1 campus. Students 
flock together on Monday nights to watch the show and live 
precariously through the characters. Kam's, a bar located at CfQZA/ NOt tll^ 
618 E. Daniel St. in Champaign, has "Melrose" specials every ,. . ,, , , , 

Monday night when the show is aired. Kam's has drink spe- Lillfiy lilUL WUUIU 
cials and shows "Melrose Place" on several televisions. (~) 
"It gives people a place to go to watch it," said Doug Baker, 
a manager at Kam's. □ Kam's was not the only place that 
has "Melrose" parties. Several other places all over the 
country have heightened the craze. Kam's "got the idea from j^^' ^^' •• 
up in the city and other campuses," Baker said. □ And the success contin- 
ues. Elisheva Barrow, junior in Agriculture, said that it is the anti-reality theme 
that draws her. □ "It's good. It's fun to watch the drama because it's so 
unrealistic," Barrow said. "It's more exciting than daytime soap operas because 
it's so crazy. Not the thing that would happen to the average, everyday person." 
□ The reality is that "Melrose Place" is here to stay. Its young, loyal audience 
will probably be engrossed in its sexual intrigue for years to come. □ The 
success of "Melrose Place" can be attributed to it being a complete fantasy. It 
still would not have that special appeal if it did not involve young and beauti- 
ful twentysomethings in larger-than-life situations. The hallmarks of the show 
are sex, lust and greed. Fittingly, "Melrose" is on the Fox network. 



story by Stephen Wunderlich 
layout by Amara Rozgus 



Its more exciting 
than daytime 
soap operas 
because its so 



happen to the 
average, everyday 



»:53Kr;. 



MELROSE Place 



73 




Lunchtime Rush 



UnicDn PairR LcDses 



""& 



^^^^^^^^^^^^B fter a hard day's work, a hot meal sounds wonderful, 
I ■■ ^H but dorm residents said they often did not know what 

I ■■ ^H they were bargaining with. A main entree could have 

I ■ ■ ^H resembled leftovers from biology lab while the side 

I LM ^H dishes offered little variety from the day before. □ 

I ^^^ ^H As an alternative to this drudgery, many residents 

B WW ^^ found themselves using their free flow cash equivalen- 
cy privileges daily. Free flow, a supplement to the reg- 
ular board program of the University Housing Division, enabled residents with 
valid meal contracts to obtain limited service in select snack bars and restau- 
rants on campus that were managed by the University Dining Services. Dining 
areas included Penn Station, lllini Orange, Beckman Institute, the Law School, 
lllini Union Ballroom and Union Park. □ These dining areas, especially 
Union Park, offered an option to dorm food. Originally known as the Down 
Under, Union Park received a new look and was open for 
Dy lirniUriQ JiQQ business after renovations were completed at the end of 

August. □ "We went from the traditional service line 
to a food court concept," said Holland F. Smith, university 
iriQ Q]A/Q\/ Q ]A/I10IG ^^^^ service director. "Each of the seven stations operate 

independently of each other and are open at different 
hours. " □ The range of possibilities included Wok this 
Way, The Grill, Salsa, The Garden, Pipe 'n Hot and 
Pastabilities. With early and extended hours, Pastabilities 
and Pipe n Hot have already become favorites, according 
to Smith. □ "All the stations were opened by lo a.m. 
Based on demand and traffic flow, the hours were apt to change," Smith said. 
□ Although the prospect of a hearty meal lured residence hall students to 
the Union, free flow privileges between lo a.m. and 2 p.m. became obsolete at 
Union Park this year. □ "Two years ago, they opened up free flow in the 
Union but this locked up Union Services. There were a lot of people, including 
staff, faculty and visitors who couldn't use it because of free flow," Smith 
explained. □ Ann Pedersen, junior in LAS, became infuriated when she first 
heard about the policy. "I was really upset about it because I had signed my 
housing contract with a 20 meal plan, thinking that I'd have time for a good 
sandwich at the Union. Then I found out that I couldn't free flow this year when 
I got to campus," Pedersen said. □ Not only did the Union provide con- 
venience but also better selection. □ "I liked to go to the Union because I 
liked the deli," said Cara Nielsen, junior in Education. "By limiting free flow, 
they're turning away a whole segment of the population from the Union." H 
Despite some of the drawbacks associated with free flow, the general impres- 
sion of Union Park seems positive. At the same time, some students were still 
coping with the loss of lundi time free flow. H '| don't feel the university 
informs students well enough on changes that they decide to make. They for- 
get you can't have a university without students," Pedersen said. 



story by Sheowting Lu 
layout by Colleen Chi istensen 



flow, they're turn- 



segment of the 
population from 
the Union." 





74 



Student Life 




-Mfe 




\\ In the new Union Park Food Court, Stephen 
Wunderhch, senior in Communications, 
gives Lisa Kennedy his cash at "The 
Garden." Free flow enabled students with 
vahd meal contracts to obtain Mmited ser- 
vice at a variety of snack bars and restau- 
rants on campus that were managed by 
University Dining Service. 



I I With dormitory residents restricted 
from using their free flow during 
lunch hours, the Union Park Food 
Court is not as crowded as in pre- 
vious years. Although the prospect 
of a hearty meal lured residence 
hall students to the Union, free 
flow priveleges between lo a.m. to 
2 p.m. became obselete at the 
Union Park this year. 



■'W^ 



-Peter IVlackay 



|_J Studying is still a part of the Union Park 
Food Court Originally known as the Down 
Under, Union Park received a new look and 
was open for business after renovations 
were completed as the end of August. 



-Peter Macl<ay 




Union Park 



75 












"A lot of the streets 




Getting In-Line 



U of I Students A.re 



ollerblading became a popular recreational activity as 
well as an athletic activity. On an average day, a person 
could see students rollerblading on the Quad, either 
going to classes or just out for the exercise. □ 
When students wanted to take a break from studying 
and get together with a few of their friends, they put on 
the rollerblades and took off, leaving everything else 
behind. For Ritu Vig, freshman in LAS, her first experi- 
ence on rollerblades took place in the halls of a residence hall. D Vig said 
that she was "holding onto the walls and having my friends push me." □ 
Gery and Ms, located at 606 E. Green St., sold rollerblades to customers who 
were mostly college students. They also sold pads and other necessary items 
for rollerbladers. Greg Baumer, who had worked at Gery and Ms for three 
years and was the manager there, said, "We don't stock a 
lot" because demand was not that high since the store just 
Qren t sate tor started semng them within the past year. The store carries 
• . „ six different styles with a total of approximately "75 indi- 

L/^^if II is^i J. vidual boxes of skates at peak," stated Baumer. Peak sales 
occurred at a time when the majority of college students moved back to the 
university from mid-August to mid-September. Sales of rollerblades had been 
basically equal between female and male students. □ However, rollerblad- 
ing was not liked by everyone. Students walking on the Quad were always in 
danger of being run over by someone on rollerblades. Bicycles have been 
banned from being ridden on the Quad, but rollerblades have not been banned 
which leaves a sore spot for walkers. □ Ellen Theodore, senior in CBA, stat- 
ed, "A lot of the streets aren't safe for beginners." □ Rollerblading for 
beginners was often times difficult since the streets tend to be rocky and 
uneven. Plus, hilly areas made it harder for them to slow down or stop alto- 
gether. □ Roller hockey was a sport that had been given attention to at the 
U of I. As a result, the U of 1 had decided to build a roller hockey pad in the 
spring of 1995, where roller hockey tournaments could be held. The dimensions 
of the roller hockey pad were 200 feet by 100 feet, making the rink fairly large. 
The gravel for the ground of the roller hockey pad was laid and was complet- 
ed by October 1995. It was located on Oak Street, near First Street and Gregory 
Avenue and south of the Stadium Drive in Champaign. 

story by Suk Ju Yun 
layout by Jill Kogan 




76 



STUDENT'1-IFE 




aMfii&i^HaAnHHM: 




J Whizzing by, one stu 
dent appears unfazed 
by his method of get- 
ting around. For 
many students, in- 
hne skating is just 
another way to shop, 
get to class or just 
exercise. 



-Peter Mackay 

I — ' University students skate across 
the Quad on their way to classes. 
Bicycles have been banned from 
being ridden on the Quad, but 
rollerblades have not been 
banned which leaves a sore spot 
for walkers 

1 — ! One student holds his other 
means of transportation, his 
shoes, as he skates near the IllinI 
Union. Students walking on the 
Quad were always in danger of 
being run over by someone on 
rollerblades. 



Peter Mackay 



^IS^ 





IN-LINE SKATING 



77 



Involve and Inform 



Epsilon Pelt^ Csiin 



^ 



"Epsilon Delta was 
an excellent orga- 
nization forme. I 
learned a lot of 
valuable informa- 
tion that will bene- 
fit me when I do 
begin to teach. 
This organization 
really 
reach out and help 
the children of the 
community." 



^^^^/^^^^K^^k psilon Delta, a professional educational organization, 
I MM ^^k was devoted to promoting greater knowledge of the 
I I ^^k field of education and recognizing those young people 

I K^ ^H committed to educating. The organization began in 1988 

I r^ ^^k when a small group of students got together to establish 

I ^^A ^H a group to help those future educators coming through 

I ^^ ^r the University of Illinois. The Alpha chapter was found- 
ed on Nov. 2, 1989. □ Shoshana Gadman, historian 
of Epsilon Delta and senior in Education, stated, "We heard about topics 
through the organization that we did not get to hear about in our education 
classes, more current events related." □ "Epsilon Delta was an excellent 
organization for me," said Maureen Craig, publicity chair for Epsilon Delta and 
junior in Education. "I learned a lot of valuable information that will benefit 
me when I do begin to teach. This organization really tried to reach out and 
help the children of the community." □ In addition to 
giving recognition to and informing its members, the orga- 
nization sought to foster an exchange of experiences and 
ideals of those students of Education active in its meetings 
and events. □ "Epsilon Delta was a place to establish 
community within the College of Education. The meetings 
gave important information on current topics in our field," 
said Kathy Regan, sophomore in Education. □ Jamie 
Rennick, president and sophomore in Education stated, "I 
have really enjoyed working with the board in trying to 
make this organization even more beneficial for our future 
educators." □ Epsilon Delta conducted a number of 
activities that brought together important information 
about teaching as well as fun and social opportunities to its 
members. During its meetings, speakers in some aspect of 
tried to ^^^ '^'^'^ were invited to come and present a forum for dis- 
cussion. The topics addressed were student teaching, job- 
hunting strategies and current educational issues such as 
classroom behavior management and literacy. □ During 
the spring semester of 1992, the organization helped spon- 
sor a first year teaching symposium, and for three consec- 
utive years had hosted the Teacher of the Year. Volunteer 
opportunities such as Special Olympics, tutoring/reading programs in the local 
schools and the annual get together with the Don IMoyer Boys and Girls Club 
were other ways Epsilon Delta offered field experience. The gang also held ice 
skating excursions, pig-out ice cream socials and pizza parties for its members. 
The organization continually looked for new events that promoted interrela- 
tions among its members. 

story and layout by Kristina Castillo 




I 



78 



Student Life 




-Caria Schoeffle 

I I Pictured are Epsilon Delta professional education organization members. 
The Executive Board members are: Jaime Rennick, President; Kathy 
Regan, Vice-President; Jill Rubin, Secretary; Julie Bentz, Treasurer; 
Christine Warp, Co-Historian; Shoshana Goldman, Co-Historian; Jozel 
Campagna, Publicity Chair; Maureen Craig, Publicity Chair; Katie Hutson, 
Philanthropy Chair; Sharon Rosen, Initiation Chair; Steph Langer, 
Initiation Chair; Julie Luebbers, Fundraising Chair; Lori Caravia, 
Fundraising Chair. 



"s^.- 



Epsilon Delta 



79 




Make Kids Smile 



Specii^l Rec: Leaders 



^^^^^^^^^^^H othing brightens one's day like the warm, cozy smile of 

H H H ^H a small child. Students at the U of I helped decorate the 

H Wk I J^M Champaign community by spreading the hearty giggles 

H Is I ^1 and busting smiles of children in the community who 

H I al ^H attended the After School Program through the 

H I H ^^M Champaign Park District. lI The C-U Special 

^L^^'^^^^r Recreation department of the Champaign Park District 

held various events for its citizens this year. These 

included holiday shopping trips, pumpkin pie workshops around Halloween 

and Thanksgiving, educational trips to Springfield, hay rides in the fall and 

Special Olympics in the spring in addition to the After School Programs. The 

sites for the After School Program were Bottenfield Elementary School and 

Carey Busey Elementary School, both located off of Kirby Avenue in Champaign. 

□ Brian Henry, senior in LAS and employee at the Bottenfield site, said, "The 

//iif f ^r^f-fj,, tMf/^c S-l kids were great. They made it all worthwhile. Another staff 

i MWl yjl tly vvKAj It niember and myself had a Halloween party for our groups 

Qf^Ot ^XO^riGflCG ^^ '"^ apartment. We always found ourselves referring to 

. J. the clients as our kids'." □ This program focused on 

III LkHiiIj L)J yum inclusion of all elementary aged children. Inclusion was 

viewed as important because it allowed the children to con- 
tinue to grow in diverse environments. It allowed students 
to learn from their peers, many times through modeling, 
which was good for those students who may have had dis- 
abilities. It allowed a better understanding of human dif- 
ferences, especially for those clients who were non dis- 
abled — it made these children realize that everyone had 
l/l/iL/l Qll QIJj^r^nL weaknesses and strengths in many different areas. 3 

This was also a great opportunity for U of 1 students 
because it gave them experience for their future careers. 
Most employees were in elementary or special education in the College of 
Education, or English, reading or social science majors with areas of concen- 
tration in education through LAS. □ "1 am an elementary education major, 
and 1 think that this was a great opportunity for the student body, " said Kathy 
Pagakis, junior in Education. "If I had time for a part-time job then 1 would have 
definitely considered C-U Special Recreation. Not only was it a great experience 
in terms of your career, but also in terms of good communication skills with 
children with all different abilities." O While these students made that extra 
buck, they also enriched their life-long learning skills and made new friends — 
all the while decorating the community. H "I used to babysit a boy in the 
program and it seemed that he benefitted so much from the exposure to the 
college kids, " said Julie Jack, junior in LAS. 

story by Kristina Castillo 
layout by Colleen Christensen 



careen but also in 

terms of good 

communication 

skills with children 



abilities. 



80 



STUDENT Life 



IP 









11 To pass the time. Erica Swanson. a child 
involved in the special recreation program 
at Bottenfield School in Champaign, and 
staff manager Courtney Rourke play 
Connect Four. Most special recreation 
employees were elementary education, 
English, reading or social science majors. 



LI Preparing for the big game, 
Anthony Gladney practices his 
moves with other kids in the spe- 
cial recreation program. Special 
recreation allowed children to 
earn from their peers, many times 
through modeling, which was good 
for those students with disabilities 



Peter Mackay 



I I Before their snack break, Jason Grodskey 
and the other students play a quick game 
of "I Spy", which Jason hopes to win. 
Special recreation helps the children real- 
ize that everyone has strengths and weak- 
nesses in many different areas. 



-Peter Mackay 



^^^'Wv^-r 




Special recreation 




—Paul Crano 

Sitting in the outside patio at the St. Louis 
Bread Company, Nicole Hunt, junior in FAA, 
catches up on some homework. The patio 
is a good meeting place as well as great 
place to spread out and get some work 
done. 



Munching on an apple croissant, Junior in 
Agriculture Maureen McGee enjoys loung 
ing in the outdoor atmosphere of the St. 
Louis Bread Company The bakery produces 
17 fresh baked breads daily, all made com 
pletely from scratch. 




82 



Student Life 




^Mhpawfla a itt UKti ' JiMB i M i t yrrfwat'fr 



Baguette 



Or E^t It "There 




"The food at St 
Louis is the liind of 
home cooked 



t. Louis Bread Company was a franchise restaurant that 
originated in the town of Kirkwood, Mo., right outside 
of St. Louis. They opened their doors to all of 
Champaign and its students in April of 1995. O 

Champaign's St. Louis Bread Company was located at 
510 E. John St., next to the Johnstowne Centre. There 
was both indoor and outdoor seating for the many cus- 
tomers St. Louis served. □ One counter employed 
the bakery aspect of St. Louis. The bakery produced 17 fresh baked breads daily, 
all made completely from scratch. The breads ranged from the basics such as 
rye and French to the more creative such as asiago cheese, raisin pecan, sun- 
dried tomato and sourdough. □ In fact, St. Louis store manager Tony Tomas 
said, "St. Louis was one of the first restaurants to use sourdough bread for its 
sandwiches, it is a very difficult bread to produce since it 
takes two days to make. If the bread happened to not be 
made correctly, we would have to wait two more days until 
our sandwiches could be sold. For this reason, we take the 
utmost care with a highly trained staff to produce the fresh- 
est, best tasting bread." □ The bread varieties also came f/^/~\/^ tyinKi\f /T^lio/no 
in many different sizes and shapes. Bread could be pur- J J^ _/ 

chased in loaves, strips, baguettes and one-half baguettes. StUdefltS fTllSS. It IS 
Also produced in the bakery were nine types of muffins , .,, ., 

along with croissants, scones, rolls, brownies and pretzels. ^ I IKZUILI ly UILt,! I lU 
Also, the bakery could have masqueraded as a coffee shop fj\/p ff) fHp rnnnU 
as it boasted espressos, cappuccinos and even a few iced -^ 

coffee drinks. □ Ahavah Pyrtel, senior in LAS, said, QfeOSV fOSt fOOd 
"Their cappuccinos are terrific for people who like coffee 
with a strong, rich taste." □ Besides the bakery, there 
was also a counter for the restaurant/cafe area. Although there were two dis- 
tinct sections, store food and goods could be obtained in either place. □ 
Tomas stated, "We want St. Louis Bread Company to be portrayed as one big 
restaurant. This way items can be made easily accessible to our customers." □ 
St. Louis boasted many healthy, low fat foods. Many customers took the liber- 
ty of requesting the red binder that St. Louis kept behind the counter for its 
customers. Inside, there was a breakdown of all their foods in terms of fat, 
calories and carbohydrates. □ Wendy Filinson, freshmen in FAA, conclud- 
ed, "Being a dance major, 1 can fully appreciate the lengths St. Louis goes to in 
terms of ensuring healthy food. The food at St. Louis is the kind of home cooked 
food many college students miss. It is a healthy alternative to the many greasy 
fast food places on campus." 

story by Anne Peterson 
layout by Angela Evans 



places on campus. 




-Paul Crano 



ST. LOUIS BREAD COMPANY 



83 



-Paul Graiio 

I I Rcslorinij the Groat Hall was the first phase of 
Krannerts "Renaissante Project " which heijan on 
l^ay 20. 199s In this phase, U of I Operations and 
Maintenanic personnel painted the ceiling of the 
hall and reoded the hiitlerniil wails. 



I I The U of I campus pledged S) million toward lestor 

Inij the Great Hall. A separate $900,000 was pledged 
by various U of I sources and throuy;h private sifts for 
the refurbishini! of foellin\;er Great Hall 



84 



Student i-iFE 




■irtiuMBMiH&Biia«nuatea(<Bv 




-Paul Crano 



Krannert Center 

Goes Under the Knife 



ver the last 26 years Krannert Center has been one of 
the most proMfic halls for esteemed artists to have per- 
formed at. Performers at the hall have included the 
Chicago Symphony Orchestra and the Tokyo String 
Quartet. There have been six million patrons who have 
attended shows at Krannert. This was a factor to 
Krannert Center's deterioration. D When it opened 
in 1969, Krannert was one of the most modern centers 
of its kind. It used the finest materials available, such as Indiana limestone and 
a parquet floor of teakwood from Thailand. The entire aura of Krannert was 
unique, even after 25 years. But time took its toll and the university had to 
address the situation in grand fashion. The U of 1 campus pledged $3 million 
dollars toward restoring the Great Hall during this past year. A separate 
$900,000 was pledged by various U of 1 sources and through " 
private gifts for the refurbishing of Foellinger Great Hall. 
"We want to be the best that we can be," said Jane Ellen \jQ \_Q\{Q CQXQ. Of 





It was important 



Nickell, the public information manager at Krannert Center. , , 

"We obviously feel that we are the best in many areas, but jLi (_/ 1 U LI xiUjUl v. 

there was room for improvement. Over the last 25 years, not ^/-j flint fl it I IVP 

much has been done. We wanted to get everything back in -' 

tip-top condition." □ Restoring the Great Hall was the Q£n£TatlOnS COUlu 
first phase of Krannert's "Renaissance Project" which began ^M.'yr^i/ .'i " 
on May 20, 1995. In this phase, U of I Operations and ^' 'J^jf '*■• 
Maintenance painted the ceiling of the hall and reoiled the butternut walls. 
Reoiling the walls was done to improve the acoustics of the hall. Another 
improvement was a new high quality, comprehensive audio system replaced a 
20 year old system. Handicapped accommodations were also improved in the 
hall, adding ten more seats to the floor. □ Daniel Mainstay, sophomore in 
LAS who volunteers at Krannert Center, said, "It looks great. The acoustics 
sound better and it's even more beautiful than it was before. You can definite- 
ly see and hear a difference." G Improvements to the exterior of Krannert 
Center are being made as well. The Great Hall has been reroofed, and repairs 
have been made on the building's outer steps. Another major project that was 
started over the summer was the rebuilding of the parking garages. □ U of 
1 Comptroller Craig Bezzini, who helped set up funding arrangements, wanted 
Krannert Center to be a priority of the university because ""the building is such 
a treasure in terms of its uniqueness, its size, and its scope, there was nothing 
else like it between the two coasts. It was important to take cdre of such a trea- 
sure so that future generations could enjoy it." □ Other projects to be 
addressed over the next four years include purchasing a new concert piano and 
new orchestra chairs. Everything should be finished by the end of 1998. 



story by Adam Slahor 
layout by Stephanie Fritcher 




;ijg 



KRANNERT RECONSTRUCTION 



85 



■ r 




\\ Freshman in FAA Gabriela Valencia buys a 
paper out of the vending machine in the 
undergraduate hbrary. She was looking for 
an article for her journalism class. 



I I The Daily lllini brings i ampus and oulsidc news 
lo students every weekday These hard work 
ini; staff members were responsible for keep 
m;; iiMny sludciils aware of (.iinpiis eveills 



86 



Student Life 



^ 




Extra! Extra 1 

Read All AKbouit It! 



-Peter Mackay 





pus events. 



^^^^m^^m^H n lounges, dorm rooms, apartments and even a few 
I ■ ^1 class rooms around campus, students were reading the 

I I ^1 paper. The paper refers to the many student oriented 

I I ^1 publications that circulated on and around campus. 

I I ^H Quite a few people read the Daily lllini (DO; others 

I I ^H were reading The Observer or maybe The Optimist. 

I • * ^ r While there were many reasons to read these publica- 

tions, it was an experience that most of the student 
body shared. □ The Dl was the largest of these three publications. Every 
day a student could drop a quarter on the counter of the Quad Shop, pick up a 
copy and have coverage of almost all the daily campus events. The news in the 
Dl was limited mainly to campus related events, although they did try to pro- 
vide an overview of happenings outside of campus life. This was the source that 
many students turned to in order to keep in touch with campus life. □ "I 
read the Dl from time to time to catch upon campus events, " /^i y^^^ 4-ht/-t FM -ffrwy^ 
said Barry Kleckler, senior in Agriculture. □ An option ' t-UU U iKl L/l jl Ul 1 1 

to the Dl was provided by The Observer. The Dl and The tlfflQ fQ tilTie tO 
Observer did not try to provide the same service. □ One 

of the staffers at The Observer, Laura Huntington, senior in CC/lC/7 Uu Oil CC//77" 
Engineering, said, "We are trying to foster debate on politi- 
cal issues and provide the community with a conservative 
viewpoint." □ This free publication was centered on reviewing impending 
legislation, as well as current political trends on all levels. Once a month. The 
Observer would come out with a new issue full of opinions about the state of 
the nation, the state and the university. They tried very hard to relate issues to 
the student at the U of I. □ The Optimist was another publication that came 
out once a month. This publication was admittedly more liberal, but it did not 
try to debate the issues brought up in The Observer. They addressed the con- 
cerns of people in the community that surrounded the campus and extended 
into Champaign-Urbana. The Observer tried to get viewpoints of people other 
than students. There were no actual students writing for them, as in the other 
two publications. □ Paul Young, the publisher, said of the paper, "We are 
filling a market niche that no other newspaper has filled." O If a student 
was interested in news concerning a particular college or department, then she 
or he could get one of the many newsletters that was available. Almost every 
department provided some source of news and an outlet for the creative side 
of their professors and students. The School of Architecture had Ricker Notes 
and the College of Engineering had North of Green. These were just two exam- 
ples of the many different departmental newsletters that were available. d 
All across campus, people were catching up on the news and events of their 
university. If it was ten minutes spent scanning the headlines or two hours 
spent reading every item, the various student-oriented publications kept us 
informed. 

story by Ben Hoyle 
layout by Sara Cahill 




-Peter Mackay 



Student Newspapers 



87 



To Rally for Rights 



Students dcDme Out 




rally. 



today 



bout 150 students came out to National Coming Out Day 
outside the Illini Union on Oct. 11. □ The rally was 
assembled to celebrate the rights of gays, lesbians, 
bisexuals and transgenders. The rally also helped 
patrons feel more comfortable with who they are and 
increased the awareness of student associations such 
as Spectrum, which is the Association of Students for 
Bisexual, Gay, Lesbian and Transexual concerns. d 
Spectrum, which was one of the sponsors of the event, was joined by Sister 
Insider, Colors of Pride, Freedom Alliance and Out on Campus. □ James 
Lee-Van Patten, director of the Office of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and 
Transgender concerns, commended students for showing their support for one 
another. □ It was still difficult for people, especially students, to "come 
out of the closet." National Coming Out Day demonstrated to U of I students 
that it was OK to show others that you are homosexual or 
bisexual. The rally brought together people with each type 
of sexual preference and was helpful with making students 
feel more comfortable with themselves. □ "In the long 
term, it is easier and less complicated to live an open life 
than a closeted life," said Lee-Van Patten. □ Nucha 
Isarowong, chairperson of the Illini Union Board program- 
ming committee for gay, lesbian and bisexual students and 
co-coordinator for Spectrum, was pleased with the huge 
outcome at the rally. □ Isarowong, senior in 

Communications, said "This was an empowerment rally. I 
don't think you'd find a person out here today that wasn't 
proud of being here." □ Other speakers at the rally 
included Deborah Richie, sexuality education coordinator 
at McKinley Health Center, and Reverend Karen Bush of the Community United 
Church of Christ. □ All students showed support at the rally through cheers 
and clapping. □ "I think it was important for those people walking by to 
see that there is a great number of queer people," said Ken Dorfman, senior in 
LAS. □ Each speaker hoped that this rally would have helped people come 
out of the closet if they had not done so already, and wanted these student 
organizations to gain publicity on campus. □ An "open mic" ended the 
rally, when students shared personal feelings and experiences. G The 
"Coming Out Day" was a step in the right direction for the gay community ai U 
of I, but students must remember that this rally was only a start. Students must 
follow it up with more support and emotion. 



story by Adam Slahor 
layout by Colleen Christensen 



This was an 
empowerment 
. I don't think 
you'd find a 
person out here 
that wasn't 
proud of being 
here. " 




L"" 







88 



STUDENT'L-IFE 




ViMUHiBMlMilBVB'ACVA 






I I A speaker addresses the crowd during a 
rally for gay, lesbian, bisexual and trans- 
gender rights. 




-Paul Giano 




\l Director of the Office of Lesbian, Gay, 
Bisexual and Transgender concerns 
commended students for showing their 
support for each other. "In the long 
term, it is easier and less complicated to 
live an open life than a closeted life," 
said Lee-Van Patten. 

\\ Several onlookers sit on the South Patio 
of the lllini Union. The rally was assem- 
bled to celebrate the rights of gays, les- 
bians, bisexuals and transgenders. 




Gay/Lesbian Rally 



89 




fl The corner of High and Cedar Streets in 
Urbana Is one of the quieter places to 
hve It Is located just a few blocks front 
Lincoln Square Mall 

rjA carrier for The News-Gazette com 
pletes her route deep in Urbana Many 
students choose to subscribe to local 
newspapers to keep up with current 
local events. 



P.iul C.umo 




r.iui 1 .i.iiv 



90 STUDENT l-IFE 



>•■>!^^*■^^:^. 



Far Beyond 



"The Limits of Campus 



^^l^m^l^^H here were many decisions involved when deciding to attend the U of I. For 
I BB^H ^H some, the decision of where to live was one of the most important. The U of I 
I ' '■ "" ^H campus offered many options as to where to live while attending the universi- 

I I ^H ty. Residence halls, apartments or sorority and fraternity houses were some of 

I I ^H the options students had when choosing where to live. D The location of 

I I ^1 one's residence was a main deciding factor. Close to the Quad, close to the 

I _____^^ ^^'^^' ^'*^^^ t^ ^^^ studio — wherever one decided to reside would eventually 

become an important part of his or her experience at the U of I. G Some 
students, however, chose to either live off campus or at home and then com- /^i Ijly^^^ I/, rlf-t/^ r\(( 
mute to classes. In doing this, these students had completely different expe- llfxC W II v II iKj ^JJ 

riences than those who remained on campus. Many issues they faced were COtTlDUS IDGCQUSG I 
parking and transportation to campus. A trip to the undergraduate library j i* • • ±i 

or a computer lab or even a class was a simple task for someone who lived IL/VfzU llVIIiy 111 LI Ifz 
in the six-pack or in an apartment near campus. □ The same trip for ripinHH/^thlDnrl 
someone who lived off campus may have involved a car, gas money, finding -^ 

a parking spot, paying a meter and usually paying a parking ticket or two, QttTlOSPllQr^. It 
or even a ride on America's best little transit system — the Mass Transit .»<-/■ 

District (MTD). □ Jennifer Pinto, senior in ALS, said, T loved living on '^(J^ ^ VtZiy UlJjKZr' 
campus because there was more of a chance that I'd go to class. Also, if I Oflf fPPUnO thOll 
lived off campus then 1 would have had to worry about driving to the bars ... , 

and going out with my friends." □ Off campus living required more IIVinQ C/C/Sci ZO 
effort to accomplish things on the campus. Christy O'Connell, senior in ALS, 
said, "I preferred living on campus. It was closer to everything and you did- 
n't have to drive back and forth to class." □ There were, however, many 
advantages to living off campus. Remaining in the "real world" allowed for 
a diversity in those one lived around and interacted with. For those who 
lived farther from the university, the variety of people expands and grows 
into a completely different Champaign or Urbana that no one who lived on 

campus could ever know. □ The neighbors, instead of having keg par- QrlQ SOiTlQ M/ci C 
ties on the weekends, may have been baby-sitting their grandchildren. The _ » . i/Hnr^l-c " 
cultural diversity and mix of ages may have proven to be more educational •^•■'^*^^ *-^' 
than some of the classes at the U of 1. '3 Learning to interact with different people was a very 
important part of one's education here. To be surrounded by those exactly like yourself was no chal- 
lenge to better those communication skills. G Kelly Raab, junior in LAS, stated, "I liked living off 
campus because 1 loved living in the neighborhood atmosphere. It was a very different feeling than liv- 
ing closer to campus. 1 have nice and friendly neighbors, some were retired and some were students. 
It was interesting to see how other people lived." 



story by Kelly Brown 
layout by Amara Rozgus 



campus. I have 
nice and friendly 
neighbors, some 
were retired 





"WJE-" 



Living Off Campus 



91 



\\ The lead singer/guitarist for the local band 
Tiny helped the band sound anything but 
small. Tiny set the scene for Band Jam by 
being the first band to perform. 









4 



92 



STUDENT-i-IFE 




[J With complete concentration, 
Soulstice locks into a groove and 
rocks the night away. Band Jam 
helps bands, like Soulstice, get 
community exposure. 

\l At Band Jam '95, Gabriel Rosenberg 
sings sweet songs to the crowd. 
Even people who are not interested 
in music come to Band Jam just to 
experience the atmosphere. 



:1lMlHiiMilWltillWMIiS«- 




-( i<uit1('tto Roiilo 




Band Jam Gets 



/K Perfect Ten 




othing can stop U of I music lovers — not even cold, 
dreary weather. Band Jam 1995 proved just that. Several 
U of I students and Champaign-Urbana community 
members came out to enjoy hours of music and enter- 
tainment. □ The tenth annual Band Jam rocked the 
South Quad starting at noon on April 30. Although the 
turnout was not as good as in previous years due to the 
weather, many people came out to listen to the music. 
n "I thought it might be a good weekend," said Mary Banaszak, who was vis- 
iting from Chicago. "It's been on my calendar for the past three months." O 
Local bands were invited to play 45 minute sets for Band Jam 1995. The ten 
bands included Tiny, Soulstice, Lorenzo Music, Braid, Steakdaddy 6, l-Pan, 
Beezus, Moon Seven Times, Menthol and Suede Chain. Each band pumped up 
the cold crowd for its set. □ Star Course coordinated the 
entire day, including acts that came on between sets. The 
acoustic side stage dazzled the audience with crazy antics. nP Q QOOU \A/^G.K.~ 
This year's features included Gabriel Rosenberg, Andy 
Grikevich, The Other Guys and the Girls Next Door, I Miss You, 
Fidgetbrick as well as several others. □ Before the show, 
co-senior manager Sara Hage said, "We're really excited about 
this year's Band Jam. It's a very wide range of performers. It 
should be a great day." G The many performers were able 
to please the cold audience. Band members, especially, were 
happy to be able to reach a wider audience than normal. Due to its location on 
the South Quad instead of on the Quad as in previous years, people on nearby 
Gregory Avenue ventured over to see what was happening. This increased the 
audience. □ "it's a good way to spend the day," said Rex Wagner, junior in 
Engineering. □ Band members were also happy to be away from the usual 
bar scene. □ "It's great being able to feel the breeze when you play instead 
of (feeling) smoke," said Suede Chain drummer Jason Docter. □ Many peo- 
ple went to Band Jam just to get away from the norm. The many bands and the 
side attractions were far from the norm. People-watching was also a Band Jam 
side show. I~) "I'm just kind of taking a study break," said Sarah Stone, grad- 
uate student. 

story by Amara Rozgus 
layout by Colleen Christensen 



7 thought it might 



end. It's been on 
my calendar for 
the past three 
months." 





Band Jam 



93 



i^ 



[_J Taking a break in the evening, 
Timothy Shea and Paul 
Satterthwaite, both seniors in 
LAS, enjoy each other's compa- 
ny in their hving room while 
fellow roommate Angela Evans, 
graduate student, looks on. 
The three share a house with 
four others. 




-Paul Crano 

[^Arm wrestling on the dining room table, Timothy Shea 
and Paul Satterthwaite, both seniors In LAS, rely on 
Angela Evans, graduate student, to referee the contest 
Even with this good humored fun, problems do arise such 
as who is going to clean the table before the game begins 



I I Hanging around on the back porch, Tom Peroulas, senior 
in I.AS, puts a friendly arm around Angela Evans, gradu 
ale student, while Timothy Shea and Paul Sallerthwane, 
also seniors in LAS, enjoy the nice day Peroulas lecK 
that men atui women live well logciher by siabili/iiig 
each other 



94 



Student-Life 






-Paul Crano 





Toilet Seats 



/Kind Other EDilemm^s 




li over campus students learned to deal with the con- 
stant complaining from their roommates to put the seat 
down — or to leave the seat up. Coed living hit the U of 
I social scene faster than any episode of "Friends." G 
Monica Krowiak, junior in Nursing, stated, "1 had a lot 
more guy friends in high school for some weird reason. 
I always knew my ideal roommate was my friend Dom. 
We really got into the whole 'Three's Company' role 



playing thing. We could never have been freaked out by his tendencies to leave 
chest hair in the bottom of the tub or undies on the bathroom doorknob." O 
Many students really liked living with others of the opposite 
sex. ""I think its great,"" said Tom Peroulas, senior in LAS. 
"Men and women really get along well — they stabilize each 
other." □ But not everyone is so lucky. Typical room- 
mate annoyances still disturbed the natural flowing of bond- 
ing in these households as in any other single sex house- 
holds — problems with phone and electric bills, groceries, 

cabinet space and phone time to name a few. □ COUlCl fl^V^T hOV^ 

However, there were those extra added pressures among 
these gender differentiated roomies — coming home to find 
your male roommate shacking on the living room couch with 
a chick he met at Kam's, walking out of your room in your 
leopard print undies while your female roommate enter- 
tained her newest beau. There was always the oh-too-famil- 
iar walk of shame at 7 a.m. only to discover that your roomie 
had his friend that you were hot for the whole semester stay 
the night so he could meet you. And the too common battle 
of bathroom accessories: shaving cream vs. tampons 

Danielle Santoro, junior in Education, said, "I could not have /-ir^r^y l/'Kir^hi 
handled restricting my freedom because I had to worry 
about being around guys." □ There were some students who, in addition 
to the ups and downs of coed living, dealt with the ups and downs of having 
their significant other be the coed roommate of choice. □ "I liked coed liv- 
ing, but then again I lived with my boyfriend," said Katherine Panova, junior in 
Education. "We got to spend even more time together than just being on the 
same campus." 

story by Kristina Castillo 
layout by Jennifer Arendarczyk 



"We really got into 
the whole Three's 
Company' role 
playing thing. We 
could never have 
been freaked out 
by his tendencies 
to leave chest hair 
in the bottom of 
the tub or undies 
□ on the bathroom 




mw- 





Coed Living 



95 



Only Blockhead 




dh^rlie Brown Isn^t The 




■^■M 

"M^ 



of I students may have wondered who it was waving 
those colored cards around during halftime at home 
football games — never fear, resource here. Those 
"kooky" kids were demented students protesting 
against the sale of rear-end warmers for the harsh and 
uninviting seats at Memorial Stadium to keep the nos- 
talgic feelings of football season alive in the student 
body. Anyone who spent less than half his or her 
semester on campus knew that was the infamous tradition of the Block I." □ 
"I loved it," said Tori Zummo, Block I seatholder and sophomore in LAS. "It was 
so much fun, the students and their excitement. I am so proud of our school. It 
was wonderful to do my part to help carry on the spirit of U of I." □ Kevin 
Pratesa, junior in Engineering, stated, "I went to a couple of games my fresh- 
man year and I thought it was cool. My spohomore year 1 had a seat in my fra- 
ternity's block. This year I had to get seats in Block I 
because the school spirit in that section was overwhelming 
f\\r^ fhlO Cflirlf^flf^ " ''^ ^^^ ^ rush. Everyone was always standing up and 
-' cheering, following the lead of the Blockheads. Even when 

QtlQ tn^ll ^XClt6~ we were losing a game, the Blockheads kept everyone moti- 
vated and supportive." G It was not all fun and games 
for everyone though. □ "The only down side to the 
Block I was that at times it felt like it was forgotten that we 
were also students who wanted to watch a football game," 
said Zummo. '"We would jump up and down so much that we 
would miss some halftime activities, too." D "It did get 
a little old sometimes to pass the cards around over and 
over again," said Pratesa. □ All in all, the hard work 
and dedication of those who had Block I seats and the 
Blockheads themselves paid off in the end. It helped keep 
the U of I tradition alive in the hearts of its student body. 
a Marc Nestor, sophomore in Engineering, said, "I sat in 
the balcony for my first few U of 1 football games. I needed to get in to the talk- 
ing and laughing - I need something more active than the seats where all there 
was to do was huddle together and complain about the weather. It was more 
fun to be in Block I because I was really involved in the game. We also sat clos- 
er to the band which was a nice advantage." 

story by Kristina Castillo 
layout by Colleen Christensen 



It was so much 



merit I am so 

proud of our 

school. It was 

wonderful to do 

my part to help 

carry on the spirit 

ofUofi" 



96 STUOENtlg^FE 




iBjrr 



■^ff * 1^ 



^miBssmiSSsmBsssiUikSL 



W^- f< 




\\ During halftime, the students in the Block I section wave 
colored cards. The Blockheads coordinate each halftime 
show performed by the Block. 



^.f^-wi:' 




I I An lUB oishu'i l.ikcs .1 p.ilions ucdil i.iid 
Many smdenis si'i-rm-tl loery of usiny; ciodil 
cards (o buy (hins-t for foar of payiiiy; hiv;M 
flnarne rhargps. 



98 



Student Life 



Missss6^iis6xsKS9XiisssssR 





Temptation 




7 got my first 
credit card before 
coming to the U of 
1. 1 was terrified to 
use it Bysoplio- 



-Paul Crano 



Disguised in Rl^istic: 



hile in college, it was always fun to receive mail, some- 
thing that made that long walk down to the mailbox 
worthwhile. It seemed that among the bills, assorted 
sweepstakes entries, and, of course, many letters from 
home there were always a few credit card applications. 
Various claims of low annual percentage rates and no 
annual fees, gold cards, money back guarantees and 
limitless credit lines must have been tempting to those 
who had limited funds and unlimited ambition. □ For college students, 
money, or lack thereof, was a constant problem and using a credit card tem- 
porarily solved that problem. It seemed as though there 
were more opportunities to obtain credit cards while in col- 
lege. The competing credit card companies offered tantaliz- 
ing credit limits; individual stores usually offered some type 
of discount when their own store card was used to make 
purchases. One company even offered to give back a per- 
centage of all purchases made on the card in a year. □ 
Christy O'Connell, senior in ALS, said, "Credit cards were too 
much of a temptation. I went on vacation this past summer 
and spent a ton of money that I still haven't paid back. " □ /T/C/l c y cC/i my 001 
If all of these offers were tempting enough to get students rir^fp /7/n/ Cr\ f^//^f^ 
to fall into the credit card habit, how did others avoid the -^ -^ 

temptation to charge? Most students seemed leery of using ttiat /77 V C/C7Ci i7C7U 
credit cards to buy things for fear of paying high finance 
charges. □ Credit cards carry a negative air about them. 
Horror stories of high balances and debt cloud their reputa- 
tion. □ Angel Lopez, junior in LAS, said, "1 got my first 
credit card before coming to the U of I. 1 was terrified to use 
it. By sophomore year my balance got so high that my dad 
had to pay it off. I learned my lesson after that, and now 1 
only use my card when 1 know 1 can pay off the balance. " 
□ The responsible usage of credit cards by students who 
were aware of the finance charges, high balances and other 
problems they caused were probably not the type of student 
that the credit card companies were betting to profit from. 
"1 love using my credit cards because I didn't like to pay with cash all of the 
time, and it was easy to charge in the establishments on campus," said Jennifer 
Pinto, senior in ALS. "They were also good to have for spring break - you just 
have to be careful not to have charged too much because the interest will kill 
you." □ The opinions about using credit cards varied as much on campus 
than anywhere else. Credit cards were good to have for emergencies and occa- 
sional splurges, but for the most part, the consensus was that they are an evil 
in the college student's life. 



to pay it off. I 
learned my lesson 
after that, and 
now I only use my 
card when I know 
I can pay off the 
balance." 



story by Kelly Brown 
layout by Stephanie Fritcher 




Credit Cards 



99 



Student Life 







Roger Ebert 

Roger Ebert, an Urbana native who 
made his appearance at Foeilinger 
Auditorium on Oct. 12, 1995, graduat- 
ed from the university in 1964 with a 
achelor's degree in journalism. He 
the editor of the Daily lUini and 
ember of the Phi Delta Theta fra- 
ternity. He was also involved in the 
National Student Congresses and the 
National Student Association. Soon 
after graduation, Ebert's first job was 
as a feature writer for the Chicago 
Sun-Times. He landed his first posi- 
tion as a movie critic shortly after. 
And, as the story goes, the rest is his- 
toiy. Ebert attributed his love of 
movies to the one movie that made 
him realize that movies could be 
made by someone else's point of 
view, a purpose and a style that 
could make people feel a certain way 
about being alive and being in soci- 
ety, the 1958 version of "Citizen 
Kane." 



Big Ten Universities Were Birthplace To: 

*First application of computer analysis to weather 

prediction - Penn State 

*Buffered aspirin - Iowa 

*First open heart surgery and first successful bone 

marrow transplant - Minnesota 

*First sound-on-film movie projector - developed by 

Joseph Tykociner at Illinois 

*Discovery of vitamins A and B - Dr. E.V. McCoUum, 

Wisconsin faculty member 




100 



Student Life 



^jiissii^sssmam 




The Alumni Club: 

Jerry Colangelo - Phoenix 

Suns president and CEO 

Richard Frank - president of 

Walt Disney Studios 

Nicole Hollander - creator of 

comic strip "Sylvia" 

Lynn Martin - former 

Secretary of Labor 

Donna Mills - actress 

Robert Novak - columnist 

Dennis Swanson - president 

of ABC Sports 

Llugh Hefner - Playboy King 



Big Ten Universities 
Were First To: 

^sponsor a homecoming 

celebration - Illinois 

* Admit women on an equal 

basis with men - Iowa 

*Own and operate a 

hospital - Michigan 

^Confirm the existance of two 

planets outside the solar 

system - Penn State 







Big Ten 



101 



The Best Burger in Big Ten 
Country 

1. Dotry^'s Dumplings - Wisconsin 

2. Dagwoods - Michigan State 

3. Hamburg Inn #2 - Iowa 

4. Crrizy Jim's - Michigan 

5. Annie's Parlour - Minnesota 

Ihe Best Bar in Big Ten 
Country 

1. Nick's - Indiana 

2. Stub and Herb's - 
Minnesota 

3. Varsity Club - Ohio State 

4. Hariy's - Purdue 

5. Dooley's - Michigan State 
Honorable Mentions: 

1. The Union - Iowa 

2. Kam's - Illinois 

The Best Marching Band in Big 
Ten Country 

1. Wisconsin 

2. Ohio State 

3. Michigan State 

4. Michigan 

5. Illinois 

The Best Fight Song in Big 

Ten Country 

1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. Iowa 



Michigan 
Wisconsin 
Ohio State 
Michigan State 



The Best 'School Color Loyalty 
(who wore the most on game 
days) in Big Ten Country 

1. Iowa 

2. Illinois 

3. Ohio State 

4. Michigan State 

5. Michigan 

The Best 
Tailgating in Big 
Ten Country 
Michigan 





llunois 

Michigan Slate 
Iowa .*r- 

Ohio Slate 



he Biggest Student Life in 
Big Ten Country 

1. Ohio\state - S().(hK) 

2. Wisconsin - 4(),924 
3. Michigan Stale - 397 i3 

4. Minnesota - 3S.(H)0 
S. Michiuan - 3(>.300 



102 



STUDENT LIFE 



■MBiWwttWaBaBBtowpgQOL ■ 





Tailgating definition: It is freezing your rear off, sipping on 
schnapps and liot cliocolate; it is sunny, blue, crisp after- 
noons munching on brats, hot dogs, burgers or anything that 
will find its way on to the grill; it is cruising to the book- 
stores after the 8 a.m. pit stop at the bars (for greasy pepper- 
oni pizza and screwdrivers complete with a hangover) to 
pick up just one more blue and orange T-shirt with the Chief 
on the front or a pair of tacky orange mittens that just 
scream "Freak" at you; it is the lull before the storm - the 
explosion of the crowd at kick off; it is a mosaic of all that 

is uniquely Illinois. 



The Best Campus in Big Ten Country 

1. Indiana 

2. Michigan State 

3. Wisconsin 

4. Northwestern 

5. Iowa 

The Best Breakfast in Big Ten Country 
1. Angelo's - Michigan 

2. Mickie's - Wisconsin 

3. Triple XXX - Purdue 
4. Runcible Spoon - Indiana 

5. Aunt Sonya's - Illinois 



The Best Mascot in Big Ten 

Country 

1. Herky Hawkeye 

2. Bucky Badger 

3. Boilermaker Pete 

4. Willie the Wildcat 

5. Goldie Gopher 

The Best Stadium in Big Ten 

Country 

1. Ohio State 

2. Memorial Stadium - Illinios 

3. Michigan 

4. Kinnick - Iowa 

5. Spartan - Michigan State 



6. Illinios - 36,000 

7. Purdue - 35,l6l 

8. Penn State - 31,421 

9. Iowa - 28,000 

10. Indiana - 11,201 

11. Northwestern - 7,400 




Big Ten 



103 



.-dilbh^ 




f f 







A cademics 

Emma Brennan, Editor 

Academics at the U of I includes many things. More than just 
attending classes, a separated look at these components reveals 
nothing, hut when they are viewed as one picture they form the 
mosaic we know as academics. Research opportunities, academic 
organizations and teaching facilities are among the varied aspects of 
diCdideYY\\a at the U of 1. 

There are a wide variety of opportunities for students at the U of 1 
to expand their horizons. From the Study Abroad Office to the Career 
Services Center to the agricultural and engineering open houses, this 
university offers a multitude of ways for students to enhance their 
academic careers. 

Research opportunities are another area where the U of I excels. 
Beckman Institute offers up-to-the-minute technology for students 
investigating a wide variety of topics. For those students interested in 
more traditional areas of research, laboratory classes in entomology 
and biology are available. 

Along with progressive research opportunities, the U of 1 also has 
many technical advantages. The ne\N on-line system allowed students 
to register for their classes this year using a computer. Computer sites 
located across campus permitted students the chance to pick up 
classes and eliminated the wait at the Armory. 

Academics at the U of 1 also include teaching facilities. These 
facilities range from large lecture halls to professors' offices to 
classrooms. Students also have the opportunity to escape from 
classrooms and learn in a variety of situations. The World Heritage 
Museum and the Astronomy observatory are two locations where 
students have the opportunity to learn without listening to a teacher 
give a lecture. 

Academic organizations are another important component 
making up academics at the U of I. Opportunities in the Krannert 
Center Student Association and the Marching Illini offer students a 
way to add to their academic experience without opening a book. 

Academics also include classes. Students often try their hardest to 
find easy classes and to get the popular teachers, but other students 
try to make it through their semesters by registering for interesting 
classes. From working with horses to facilitating acquaintance rape 
education workshops to designing machines to help the disabled, the 
U of I has it all. Because the U of I is so big, class size is another area of 
interest. For students looking for a more personal touch. Discovery 
Classes offer smaller discussion sections. 

The U of 1 also has inany hidden opportunities for students. There 
are many departments and academic programs on this campus that 
are often overlooked. The Rehab Clinic and the department of Speech 
and Hearing Science are two examples of hidden resources at the U of I. 

Although students may have to search, opportunities abound at the 
U of I for academic enhancement. Those students whose academic 
careers are made up solely of attending classes and studying miss out 
on the mosaic of opportunities. 



In The Wild 




Natural history 

museum provides 

entertainment 



"77z^ museum is not 
about objects, it's about 
ideas. The viewer should 
be interested in learning 
more. " 



Story by 

JENNIFER ARENDARCZYK 

Layout by 
Jill Kogan 



In the 1860.S, the Natural 
History Museum opened its doors 
to the pubHc. It featured exhibits 
deahng with the natural history of 
Illinois. 0\'er the years, it acquired 
many more exhibits. When the 
Colombian Exhibition of the 1890s 
closed in Chicago, some of the 
exhibits came to the museum. The 
bulk of the exhibits were accjuired 
during the 1950s and the 1960s. 
The focus of the museum is on the 
natural history of Illinois. The 
exhibits are not only things to look 
at, but should also be experienced. 

"The museum is not about 
objects, it's about ideas," said 
Douglas J. Brewer, director of the 
Natural History Museum. "The 
viewer should be interested in 
learning more," Brewer added. 

The museum resides on parts of 
the third and fourth floors of the 
Natural History Building. It is home 
to a variety of different exhibits. 

One room of the museum has 
stuffed and preser\ed animals and 
insects for one to \iew. There are 
stuffed birds, fish and butterflies 
that can be seen in their full forms. 
There are also marine li\ing ani- 
mals such as the nautilus which 
people can see that they may not 
have a chance to v'ww naturally. 

Tlu' nuist'uni also houses the 
Discovery Room, where kids of all 
ages can get a hands-on look at nat- 
ural history. There are casts of fos- 
sils to touch and furs lo pr\ plus 
oilier cxhibils lli.il crcalc ,ui inUT- 



acti\e feel to the museum. About 
600 to 700 grammar school chil- 
dren \'isit the museum e\-ery month. 
Brewer commented on how the 
Discoxery Room is ' a reflection of 
the museum proper It is there to 
enhance the learning of the \iewer 

There are also life-sized diora- 
mas depicting animals in their nat- 
ural habitats. One can walk through 
the forest and see bears rummaging 
through the brush. There is also 
swampy marshlands where long 
legged birds wade through shallow 
water. The newest addition to the 
museum was the exhibit World of 
the Etah. This exhibit was inspired 
by an expedition the U of I and 
National Geographic went on. 
There is also an exhibit on Nati\e 
^American horticulture. It depicts 
Native American plant use. 

There are also plans to add a 
new exhibit to the museum. The 
next exhibit to be put up will be one 
dealing with dinosaurs. The 
hadrosaur, or duck-billed dinosam; 
will be resurrected within the next 
year or so. 

"Our interest is in education, 
educating the university and sur- 
rounding community of issues with 
natural history," said Brewer 

riie museimi is home to a \<ui- 
el\ ol wildlilc. \\ lielher \ou are in 
a class that recjuires nou to go 
there or the lamiK is looking for <\ 
neat pLu c lo visit, the X.iUn.il 
Histor\ Museum li.is sdnielhing 
lor eveiAoue. 



Natural History 



106 



Academics 




-Peter Mackay 





uring a break between 
classes. Bob Wolfe, 
junior in LAS, strolls 
through the Museum of Natural 
History. One room of the museum 
has stiffed and preserved animals 
and insects for one to view. 

volunteer in the 
Discovery Room, 
Carrie Donovan, 
junior in LAS, paints a mural on 
the west wall of the room. The 
Discovery Room is a hands-on 
exhibit for children. 




-Peter Mackay 



Natural History Museum 



107 



Cultural Secret 



Campus museum 
treats visitors to 
ancient artifacts 



''Most people come back 
as alums and find the 
museum. '' 



Story by 

Jennifer Arendarczyk 

Layout by 

Jill Kogan 



Do you know where to find a 
1582 version of "Aesop's Fables" 
with both the Greek and Latin 
translations? Or the mummy of a 
pre-adolescent boy from 818-715 
B.C.? Well if you do not then you 
are missing "the best secret on 
campus," according to Diana 
Johnson, the educational coordi- 
nator for the World Heritage 
Museum. 

"Most people come back as 
alums and find the museum," noted 
Johnson. 

The vast majority of people have 
been missing one of the oldest 
museums in the Champaign 
County area. On July 8, 1911, the 
Board of Trustees approved the 
establishment of two new museums 
to open at the U of I campus. The 
Classical Museum and a European 
Culture Museum were located on 
the fourth floor of Lincoln Hall. 
This space was held until William 
Spurlock, a 1924 U of I graduate, 
left a multi-million dollar bequest to 
build a whole building for the muse- 
um. The new Spurlock Museum of 
World Cultures will be located on 
Lincoln Avenue between Illinois 
and California Streets. 

The museums' location in 
Lincoln Hall was a little small, but 
the magnitude of the artifacts there 
were not belittled by these confines. 

The museums o]5enecl in Lincoln 
Hall ill .\()\cinl)cr of 1!)I2 as edu- 
cational centers for the (ie])artmeiits 
of liistoiA. so( iai sciences, lanauasies 



and literature. Today, the museum 
continues this tradition by opening 
its doors to local grammar and high 
school students. 

People walking- through the 
museum were treated to glimpses of 
artifacts from the great civilizations 
of the past. The room called 
"Man's Venture in Culture" offered 
30 different dioramas of milestones 
in human achievement. The disco\- 
ery of metal, the imention of writ- 
ing and great works of art were all 
displayed in this room. Many of the 
dioramas were made by the cele- 
brated artist, Lorado Taft and his 
students. 

From there, one can head into 
the main museum. The Ancient 
Egypt exhibit featured a letter writ- 
ten on papyrus from 2,000 years 
ago and a stone tablet with part of 
the Book of James inscribed on it. 
The Greece exhibit featured casts of 
the Parthenon frieze. The molds 
used for this were from 200 years 
ago when the frieze was in much 
better condition. The Roman 
gallery featured \ases, wall paint- 
ings and jewelry. The European 
gallery offered suits of armor, 
model ships and swords. Ihe 
gallery also contained a page from 
the (Julenberg Bible. 1 he Orienial. 
.Aliican and \e\\ World galU-iA had 
masks, textiles and iinniture. 

If the mood liits nou to re\el in 
the past, the Woiiil Heritage 
Museum is lor you. Check it out 
and s.i\ hi to the imiiunn lor lue. 





i 

a 

an 

1 
1 


r 

1 



* I 





108 



Academics 




topping in the ] 1 oiid 
Heritage Museum 
between classes, David 
Paulitz examines one of the display 
cases. Students are often required to 
vint the museum for a class or to 
cotnplete a report. 



he exhibit of ancient 
Egypt features a mural 
painting that runs the 
entire length of the hallway. The 
mural is a depiction of an entire 
year's events. 



statue of Artemis of 
Gabii is on display in 
the museum. This 



piece is a copy of an original 
which is in the Louvre in Paris, 
France. 



-Peter Mackay 



World Heritage Museum 109 



Marching A long 



The largest 

collection in 

the world 



"Sousa liked the way 
Harding kept his music 
and the way his library 
was ordered. He wanted 
his items to be housed 
here where he felt there 
would be the greatest 
impact. " 



Story by 

Jennifer Arendarczyk 

Layout by 
Amara Rozgus 



In 1932, U of I became the home of 
many John Philip Sousa items. This labeled 
U of I as holding the largest Sousa collec- 
tion, making U of I the most important 
place of its kind in the world. In charge of 
this vast collection was Phyllis Danner, 
Sousa archivist, librarian and professor of 
library administration. 

Danner has been working with the col- 
lection since 1 984. Within the archives were 
Sousa's music paraphernalia as well as the 
collections of other famous band members 
and leaders. 

Herbert L. Clark, a former member of 
Sousa's l)and, donated pictures, musical 
scores, old correspondence and other mem- 
orabilia from Sousa's era. Original scores 
written by Sousa and some of the instru- 
ments he played during his career were 
included in U of Fs collection. 

A. Austin Harding, first director for the 
U of I marching band, also donated his 
musical scores and old copies of the march- 
ing band's music books. In addition, the 
museum contained the Carl Busch musical 
instrument collection. 

Included in the many items at this muse- 
um are a Zither, old drums and a nail harp. 
There is also a wide variety of horns, rang- 
ing from ornately designed ones to old tar- 
nished ones. The collection also has Mark 
Hindsley's papers, photographs and books. 
Hindsley was the second liand leader for the 



U of I marching band. Amidst his collection 
are numerous pictures of all the old great 
band leaders of yesteryear. 

The museum and archi\es almost did 
not attain the John Philip Sousa items. In 
1906, Sousa and his band played at the U of 
I. After the show, Sousa was introduced to 
Harding and the two dexeloped a close 
friendship with Sousa becoming Harding's 
mentor. 

"Sousa was like a father figure to 
Harding," Danner commented. "Sousa 
liked the way Harding kept his music and 
the way his library was ordered. He wanted 
his items to be housed here where he felt 
there would be the greatest impact.'" 

The only problem was Sousa ne\er 
wrote this down. It was through numerous 
appeals to Sousa's estate and family that 
most of his collection came to rest at the U 
of I. 

This vast collection is being used to the 
extent that Sousa hoped it would be. The 
archives helped with sLx dissertations in the 
past two years. It also drew the attention of 
the music industry. It was set up not only to 
chronicle the works oi" the greats in band 
history but to also further the educational 
goals of those interested in band history. 
Sousa's legacy li\'es on at the U of I. the 
school w here lu- became honorar\' conduc- 
tor of the college band \s iiich he lelt was the 
greatest band in the world. 



Sousa IMuseum 



1 1 O Academics 






/; the Sousa Museum, 
Robert Wedgeworth, 
head librarian, exam- 
ines an old harp once used by a 
member oj John Philip Sousa's 
band. The Sousa Museum houses 
many other band instruments. 

heUof FsHead 
Librarian Robert 
Wedgeworth examines 
original score sheet music by John 
Philip Sousa. Phyllis Banner, 
curator of the Sousa Museum in 
the Harding Band Building, helps 
him look through the files. Some of 
the music is destined for an exhibit 
in the Rare Book Room. 




-Peter Mackay 



-Peter mackay 



John Philip Sousa Museum 



1 1 1 





n the Krannert Center 

costume shop, 

Rosemary 
Kaczmarowski, graduate student, 
creates a mask for an upcoming per- 
formance called "Hencefonvard. " 
In addition, this shop did costuming 
for outside productions. 

onsulting with her 
boss, Heather Brown, 
graduate student 
Rosemary Kaczmarowsky talks 
about changes she had to make in 
her mask design. Each year the 
costume shop produced approxi- 
mately 1,000 costumes. 




-Peter Mach 




1 12 



Academics 



Dr essing Up 



Due to its hidden location in the 
production labyrinths of Krannert 
Center for the Performing Arts, 
myths abounded aliout the activity 
bustling from the costume shop. 
One of Krannert "s claims to fame, 
the costume shop provided the fash- 
ions sported in all of the shows per- 
formed at Krannert. 

In addition, this shop did cos- 
tuming for outside productions 
including the eight identical shirts 
for Dustin Hoffman in Robin 
Williams' "Hook" as well as a 
replacement costume for Belle in 
the Broadway production of 
"Beauty and the Beast." 

Costume Shop Director Janice 
Lines boasted that costuming jobs 
outside of Krannert spun out of 
praise for the shop froin former U 
of I costume design graduates. 
Some U of I graduates garnered 
Jeff Awards, the Chicago \ersion of 
New York City's Tony Awards for 
theater design. 

The costume shop sprawled out 
from a sewing/design center into 
several vaults, a laimdry room, a 
mirrored fitting room and a wig 
room. Each year the shop produced 
approximately 1,000 costumes. 
This labor fell on the hands of a full 
time professional staff of se\'en, in 
addition to 1 3 graduate students and 
three undergraduates. Students 
designed 90 percent of the costumes 
and accessories in the 22 shows per- 
formed at Krannert. The costume 



shop staff worked on an average of 
five to seven shows at the same time. 

"I don't think people realize that 
we do all the wigs, shoes, jewelry 
and hats for shows," Lines said. 
"We don't ju.st do dresses." 

Jennifer Keller, senior in FAA, 
said that she worked in the shop for 
1 2 hours each weekday. "Don't 
become a theater major if you're 
not dedicated," she said. 

Originally an art major, Keller 
said, "I didn't know how to sew 
before I got here, but I could draw." 
Her drawing talents were soon put 
to use and enhanced with under- 
graduate course requirements in 
acting, lighting and costume. 

All of the fashions originated in 
the costume shop from renderings 
or model drawings were typically 
designed by U of I students. Wig 
materials used in these productions 
came from human hair. The shop 
stored all of the old costumes in one 
of sLx vaults in Krannert. 

"E\ery year around Halloween 
the costume shop sells off a lot of 
their costumes," said Kathy Cupec, 
Krannert Center Student 

Association tour guide and sopho- 
more in Engineering. 

Lines commented that some of 
the strangest costumes produced in 
the costume shop included a suit- 
coat covered with stuffed white 
gloves for a dance show and 
dinosaur outfits for the "Skin of our 
Teeth" production. 



Krannert Center 
costume shop in 
the spotlight 



"/ don't think people real- 
ize that we do all the 
wigs, shoes, jewelry and 
hats for the show. We 
don't do just dresses/' 



Story by 
Chuan-Lin Alice Tsai 

Layout by 
Jill Kogan 



Costume Shop 



Krannert Costume Shop 



1 13 



A Way Out 



STUDENTS FIND A 

WAY TO MAKE 

LIFE EASIER 



''Certain classes were 
great to have inyour 
schedule because they 
could be a break from 
more stressful classes and 
they oftentimes could be a 
lot more fun. " 



Story by 
Jill Kogan 



Layout by 

Anna Nommensen and 

Sara Cahill 



It had always laeen a common 
goal among Uni\er.sity students. 
\\ hether it was the campus moxers 
and shakers looking for a break or 
the couch potatoes finding a new 
outlet for their laziness, e\'erybody 
wanted to find the perfect "easy 
class." 

"Certain classes were great to 
ha\'e in your schedule because they 
could be a break from more stressful 
classes and they oftentimes could be 
a lot more fun." said Betsey Siska, 
senior in Comminiications. 

It was common to see students 
frantically flipping through timeta- 
bles in an effort to find the perfect 
"easy class." Some chose "easy 
classes" because their friends told 
them to, some because the class fit 
their schedules and others because 
they sounded easy. 

Easy classes fell into a \ariety of 
categories. The first category was 
classes that did not require much 
effort to recei\e an A. They usually 
met only a few times a week and 
required little or no homework. Ice 
skating was a popular choice among 
freshmen and seniors alike. 

"Backward Swizzles, Shoot the 
Ducks and ShowjjIow Stoj^s were 
not as easy as the instructors made 
them seem," .said Todd Boza, senior 
in (1B.\. "Howex'er, il nou ])ia(tiicd 
and ua\c it a mMuiinc clloit anNone 



can get an A." 

A second category of easy class- 
es was those General Education 
courses like Ecology; Ethology and 
Evolution 105. These classes were 
labeled easy because they did not 
recjuire homework or, in some cases, 
e\en class attendance. 

"Although you were required to 
bu\' a textbook, all of the test ques- 
tions came out of a lecture note- 
book that you could borrow from a 
friend who highlighted it last semes- 
ter," said Daniel Trevino. junior in 
LAS. "Also. pre\ious tests were 
widely a\ailable and you could get 
a very good idea about the upcom- 
ing test by memorizing those 
answers." 

The third category of easy class- 
es was special interest courses. .An 
example of this t\pe was English 
104. Introduction to Film. Students 
took this class because they enjoyed 
watching and discussing films. 
\VhiIe this may not ha\e been a 
truly "easy" course, it was still a 
source of enjoyment for many. 

The central message concerning 
the search for an easy class was fair- 
1\ ck'ar. .Students easiK ix'canu" 
bored if ihey were not interi'sit'd in 
the class to i)egin with. I'hc best 
aiKiif was to lake i lasses th.u were 
inninsiealK nioiix.uing and thi'ii 
ur.ides were secondarv 





Easy Classes 



1 14 



Academics 



vssi 





-Peter mackay 




// English 104, Ron 
Jenning lectures to his 
students on the lighting 
techniques used in film. This 
class did not provide for an easy A, 
but was a most enjoyable hour. 




rcparing to take the ice 
for her Kinesiology 
104 class. Brandy 
Sromni laces up her skates. Ice 
skating was a popular class choice 
for a break in the day. 



Easy Classes 



1 15 



Logging O n 



University of 

Illinois on-line 

Registration 



'^Waiting to get logged on 
is much better than wait- 
ing in line at the 

Armory. '' 



Story by 

Amie Megginson 

Layout by 

Colleen Christensen 



The daring nt- w on-line registra- 
tion system put students on the edge 
of their seats as they waited for their 
assigned time to log on. 

The U of I changed the tradition 
of students standing in long lines at 
the Armory each fall, hoping that it 
wasn't all in \'ain, waiting to sign up 
for classes. At first students were not 
sure what to think of the new sys- 
tem. E\en though going to the 
Armory for registration was a pain, 
students knew that it was a system 
that assured them of being able to 
pick up a class. e\'en though it might 
not be the one they wanted. 

If the new computer system 
were to crash during the middle of 
registration, what would students 
do? This thought scared a lot of 
students. Karen Hroma, a junior in 
LAS, was extremely wary as regis- 
tration began. Like e\ery other stu- 
dent, when her registration time 
came she logged on to the program 
and hoped for the best. 

Hroma successfully picked up all 
of her classes and turned off the 
comjjuter with a sigh of relief. She 
admitted that it was more con\e- 
nicnl than going to the .\rni()r\ and 
wasting a lot oi time sl.mding 
around. 

"It's al)()ul lime we had il. (on- 
sidcring c\('r\ olher si.ue scluiol 
does." said I Ironia. 

Sludcnls lamili.ir widi e-mail 



had an easier time getting used to 
the new system due to their many 
similarities. Tama Brooks, a junior 
transfer student in ALS, learned 
how to use her e-rriail account last 
year and lo\ed it. Learning how to 
use the on-line system was \ery eas)' 
for her because of e-mail. Brooks 
said that she was grateful for the 
new process. 

"Waiting to get logged on is 
much better than waiting in line at 
the Armory. " Brooks said. 

By the time registration was o\er. 
few problems had been encoiui- 
tered with the new system, consid- 
ering that it was the first time it had 
been used at this uni\ersir\". One 
minor bug some students encoun- 
tered was logging on from a 
modem. Many times the program 
would begin to load the fi\e steps, 
but after the third step il would kick 
the student out of the program. 

Kerry Kolososki, a sophomore in 
L.\S, became frustrated with this 
problem. 

"It was a lot harder to get onto 
the system iiom a modem that was- 
n't directly linked to the uni\ersiiy." 
Kolososki said. 

Oxcr.ill. the majority oi' students 
seem to be satislied wiiii ilu- on-line 
registration program. It was .1 sieji 
in ihe right direction to m. iking 
e\ei'\()ne"s life .u tiic uni\ciNii\ .1 lii- 
lie easier. 



I 



ivi- 



7:u^ 







Registration 




1 16 



Academics 





/ Iliuii Hall. Slianna 
Bufilla, senior in LAS, 
registers for her classes 
icilli I ' of Fs new modernized on- 
line registration. The U of I 
changed from the traditional regis- 
tration at the Armory to a more 
modern, computerized system. 



-Paul Grano 



tudents work diligently 
at the computer tcrmi- 
luils. which arc avail- 
able throughout campus. Students 
with e-mail experience were able to 
become familiar with on-line regis- 
tration, due to the many similarties. 



On-line Registration 



1 17 



New Horizons 



HELPING STUDENTS 

EXPERIENCE THE 

ADVENTURE 



"/ could think of few 
jobs that involved the 
ability to drastically 
change a students life. 
This was the aspect of 
the office that I thought 
kept the advising staff 
energized and committed 
to helping students as 
much as possible. " 



STORY BY 
TIMOTHY SHEA 



Layout by 
jill kogan 



The Study Abroad Office 
w orked hard this year to expand the 
horizons of U of I students. It did 
tliis by encouraging students to add 
to their schedules a semester or t\vo 
of study at a foreign uni\'ersity. 
Advisors and staff in the Study 
Abroad Office had a working 
knowledge of the many opportuni- 
ties available to study in se\'eral con- 
tinents. They provided assistance 
and direction to interested students. 
^\11 advisors in this office had stud- 
ied abroad, and. therefore, were 
particularly effective in helping stu- 
dents select which country would be 
best suited to their needs. 

The Study Abroad Office hosted 
foreign students who came to study 
at the U of I. The program hosted 
an equal number of students at the 
U of I as they left their homes to 
study here. 

All the full-time study abroad 
advisors were enthusiastic about 
students embarking on the adven- 
ture of studying abroad. 

Kim I homjDson. the advisor for 
programs in Germany. France. 
Russia and Italy spent four years in 
Paris before becomiitg a nu'mi)er of 
the stair. "One oi the most reward- 
ing things about advising potential 
candidates was knowing that vou 
would bi'come a ])art oi ihcir 
acKciuurc," riiiim|)s()n Naid. "Il 



was very important for me to know 
that I had helped a student under- 
take such a challenge, and because 
of my experience abroad, I felt 
good about being a part of it." 

Sophie Gladding, the advisor for 
programs in Australia and Great 
Britain, spent a year at Leeds 
L'nixersity in England. She took 
pride in sending students on a simi- 
lar journey. 

"I could think of few jobs that 
involved the abilirs" to drastically 
change a students life." Gladding 
said. "This was the aspect of the 
office that I thought kept the advis- 
ing staff energized and committed 
to helping students as much as pos- 
sible." 

The opportimit)' to advise stu- 
dents served to help some advisors 
re-live their golden days abroad. Jill 
Mraz, who studied at \brk 
University in Great Britain, was 
happy to see the excitement and 
anticipation of the students going 
abroad. 

She still remembered how she 
felt aijoul it iierself. "I had an unbe- 
lie\al)le time at \ork and returning 
to this jo!) ((unincctl mr ihat it w.is 
a cjuality e\]ieri('ncc." Mraz said. 
"So I could help to. vicariously oi 
course. i)road('n the siudeiHs hori- 
zons, and re-li\e a bit ol mv veai 
.lijioad too." 




STUDY ABROAD 



1 18 



Academics 








eafing through a listing 
of different schools, 
Sandy Bartels searches 
fir a school she can attend in 
Australia. The study abroad office 
encourages students to add to their 
schedule a semester or two of study 
at a foreign university. 



counselor in the study 
abroad office, Sophie 
Gladding, consults 
ccith three students about their 
options to work abroad for a 
semester The opportunity to advise 
students served to help some advi- 
sors re-live their golden days 
abroad. 



PETER MACKAV 



STUDY ABROAD 



1 19 



Peek at the Stars 



Observatory is 

educational and 

historical 



''We had to go therefor a 
class requirement. It was 
more interesting than I 
thought. '' 



yy.-y- 






Story by 

SUK Ju YUN 



Layout by 
Amara Rozgus 



The University of Illinois 
Astronomical Observatory, which is 
sponsored by the U of I 
Astronomical Society, is used for 
more than just looking at the stars. 
The astronomy department utilizes 
the obserx'atory to educate astrono- 
my students as a complimentary 
visual aid to lectures. 

Karen Dong, senior in CBA, had 
taken Astronomy 100 tvvo years 
ago. "We had to go there for a class 
requirement," said Dong. She also 
added, "It was more interesting 
than I thought." 

Traci Fetta, freshman in LAS, 
said, "I have to write a written 
report about what I saw at the 
observatory." 

In 1896, architect, Charles A. 
Gunn, came up with the plans to 
build a students' observatory. The 
university was given $15,000 for its 
construction by the Illinois State 
Legislature. Supervision of the con- 
struction of the observatory was 
given to Professor Ira O. Baker, who 
taught in the civil engineering 
department. Construction began in 
late April and was completed by the 
end of the summer 

The observatory held a twelve 



inch refractor telescope in the mid- 
dle of the equatorial room. The 
refractor telescope was the first to 
make a photoelectric obsenation. 
However, the main telescope is not 
located in the obser\ator)'. It is 
located in southern Illinois. 

Catherine Connor, director of 
placement for the biotechnology 
center, reasoned, "It's too light 
for astronomers to see through 
here." 

In 1956, the observatory 
expanded with new additions which 
now hold offices for the graduate 
school and the faculrv'/staff assis- 
tance program. The building no 
longer holds astronomy offices. 
Connor commented that it is one of 
the nicest buildings to work in. 

In 1995, the astronomy club had 
set up different kinds of instruments 
aroimd the obser\'ator\' to \'iew the 
solar eclipse. 

The Astronomical Obsei-\ator\ 
was one of sLx U of I buildings to be 
admitted to the National Register of 
Historic Sites in 1986. 

The obsenatory is open to the 
general public on the first Friday 
night of each month. In i99ti. the 
obser\ator\- turns a c"cntur\ old. 



Astronomy 




120 


Academics 




^H 




v^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 





he astronomy observa- 
tory, built in the late 
1800s, stands at the 
north end of the Morrow Plots 
and south of Smith Memorial 
Hall. The astronomv club uses the 
telescope housed in the builditig to 
view the moon and occasionally the 
sun. 



-Peter Mackay 



Astronomy Observatory 



121 





Indents walk past the 
eoUanade of pillars 
outside the Speech and 
Hearing Science Building. An 
audiology clinic and a speech-lan- 
guage clinic are located in the 
building. 




he northwest corner of 
the Speech and 
Hearing Science 
Building sit.s at the intersection of 
Sixth and Daniel Streets in 
Champaign. Speech and hearing 
science is a department in the 
College oj Applied Lije Studies. 




122 



Academics 



Sight and Sound 



Although niost L' ol' I students walkftl 
])asi the Speech and Hearing Science 
Building. located on the corner of Sixth 
and Daniel Streets, few knew what went 
on inside of this building. As a part of the 
Clollege of Applied Life Studies, the 
department of s]5eech and hearing sci- 
ence was a pre-professional program for 
those training to become speech-lan- 
giiage pathologists and audiologists. 

"I think that speech and hearing sci- 
ence is a \ery di\erse and interesting 
field," said Anna Nommensen, junior in 
speech and hearing science. "Because of 
this diversity, all types of people were 
good for it, they just had to chose which 
grad school fitted their needs." 

The National Student Speech- 
Language-Hearing Association (NSSL- 
HA) required a mininuim of 25 hours of 
obsen'ation of therapy prior to being 
assigned a client. Students earned many 
of these hours working in the speech-lan- 
guage clinic. This clinic proxided senices 
for children and adults in the communiry 
who had speech and langxiage disorders. 
Disorders treated include stuttering, cleft 
palate, aphasia and head trauma. 
Graduate students conducted these thera- 
p)- sessions and undergraduates gained 
\\ ork experience by viewing these sessions. 

.An audiology clinic is also located in 
the Speech and Hearing Science 
Building. This clinic enabled undergrad- 
uates to learn from watching graduate 
students and clinicians conduct sessions 
dealing with hearing aid e\-aluation, 
brain stem responses and diagnostic test- 
ing. In addition, computerized laborato- 
ries helped students in this department 



study speech perception, speech anatomy 
and language acquisition disorders. 

"I really liked working in aural reh.i- 
bilitation because it was cool to help peo- 
ple," said Jacqueiyn Norris, first year 
graduate student in speech and hearing 
science. "Most of our speech clients were 
students at the U of L while most audiol- 
f)gy clients were from the community. I 
enjoyed working with both students and 
people from the community." 

Those majoring in speech and hear- 
ing science followed a course plan similar 
to education majors. They received a 
teaching certificate at graduation. In 
order to become a certified speech-lan- 
guage pathologist or audiologist, students 
had to go on to receive their master's 
degree, the minimum level of academic 
training required for this certification. 
Graduate programs in this field were 
highly competiti\-e, therefore students 
who planned to attend these schools 
needed to be at the top of their class as 
well as ha\e good GRE scores. The 
undergraduate program at the LI of I 
helped students prepare for the applica- 
tion process with a directory of graduate 
]3rograms and a qualified advising team. 

"Speech and hearing science was 
good for people who go into it with the 
idea that they were going to be in the top 
of their class," said EmUy Downes, senior 
in speech and hearing science. "This 
mind set was necessaiy for a student to 
get the grades required for acceptance 
into grad school. If you did not have 
grades that place you in the to]3 of your 
class, you had no chance of getting into a 
srad school." 



Silent building 
speaks through 

ACTIONS 



"/ think that speech and 
hearing science is a very 
diverse and interestingfield. 
Because of this diversity, all 
types of people were good for 
it, they just had to chose 
which grad school fitted their 
needs. " 



Story by 

Emma Brennan 



Layout by 
sara cahill 



Peter Mackay 



Speech and Hearing 



Speech and Hearing Science 



123 



Enhancing Life 



CENTER OFFERS 

SERVICES TO 

STUDENTS, STAFF 



''Our goal is to help 
remove the barrier of the 
disability, to take any 
stress off the body and to 
enhance life through 
exercise. " 



Story by 
Debbie Williams 

Layout by 

Colleen Christensen 



What began as a room in an old 
barracks building just after World 
W'dv II is now the only center of its 
kind in the United States. The 
Rehabilitation Education Center 
offers students, staff and faculty 
members with disabilities different 
types of services in different serxdce 
areas. 

One of the largest service areas 
the Rehabilitation Center offers is 
physical therapy. Students can par- 
ticipate in general physical therapy, 
range of motion training, fitness 
and conditioning training as well as 
functional training. Students may 
access the physical therapy room 
any time the facility is open. 
Appointments can also be made 
with any of the trained physical 
therapists. 

Brian Thompson, athletic train- 
er for the wheelchair sports pro- 
gram, said, "We like to pro\ ide each 
student with an indixidualized exer- 
cise program that is best suited to 
his or her specific needs. We pro- 
\ide exercise and therapy to 
improve daily life as well as extend 
life span." 

The wheelchair atiiletes use the 
physical therapy room to train lor 
sports. Currently many of liie ath- 
letes arc training lor liic I'ara- 
Olympics, which is similar to the 
regular' ( )l\iii])i(s, but ai! oi tlic .itii- 
letes are disabled. 

James Briggs, graduate student 
and wiiccUiiair atlilete said. "Riglit 
now l"m ti.nuiiig lor the power rac- 



ing mile marathon in the Para- 
Olympics. I'm looking forward to 
the year 2000 when, hopefully, the 
two Olympic games won't be sepa- 
rate anymore. All athletes will be in 
one place competing together." 

Another aspect of the 
Rehabilitation Center is the 
Adaptive Technology Lab. Here, 
students and staff members have 
access to computers as well as adap- 
tive materials needed to use these 
computers. These adaptations 
include a screen enlarger and a 
voice recognition program that 
allows the computer to be accessed 
by using voice controls. The 
Adaptive Technology Lab also 
offers students many options in 
order to help them with classes. 
Students can get books on audio 
tapes, use the lab as an alternative 
place to take tests and record essay 
type exams on tape to turn in. 

In relation to the Rehabilitation 
Center's services, a graduate studies 
program is also offered in rehabili- 
tation education. These students do 
\olunteer work as well as class work 
in the service areas of the building. 

"Currentlv, we are working on 
nitire integration l)etwt'eii the two 
programs so everyone can l)eiiefit 
from the senices we provide."' saiil 
Tim Miliikan. su|)er\ isoi' ot pinsi- 
cai therajn and iiinction.ii ti'.uning. 

"Our goal is to iuip remove the 
baiiiei oi' the disaliiiity to t.ike aii\ 
stress oil tiie 1)0(I\ .uui to eiilKUice 
lile tiirousjli exercise." Miliikan saiil. 




Rehab Center 



124 



Academics 





itness and staying in 
shape are a major pri- 
ority for Mark 
Nabielec, senior in ALS and Ann 
Walter, graduate student. Graduate 
students do volunteer work as well 
as class work in the service area of 
the building. 




> 





daptive Technology 
Lab secretary, Betsy 
AIeyer,Jinds the Tech 
Lab to be an important aspect of 
the Rehabilitation Center The 
Adaptive Technology Lab allows 
students to get books on audio 
tapes, use the lab as an alternative 
place to take tests and record essay 
type exams on tape to turn in. 



Rehabilitation Center 



125 



Doctor Doctor 



PSYCH PROFESSOR 

GIVES TIPS 

TO STUDENTS 



"Don't just wait for 
teachers or books to come 
to you and tell you what 
to do. Instead, go after 
things and make them 
happen. '' 



Story by 
Emma Brennan 



Layout by 
amara rozgus 



One of the most popular teach- 
ers at the U of I is also a student. 
Joel Shenker, a psychology' instruc- 
tor, is currently pursuing a doctoral 
degree in psychology and a medical 
degree. 

"I \alue education — I'm 32 
years old and Fm only now finish- 
ing school as I complete my doctor- 
al degrees," said Shenker. 

Originally fi"om Portland, Ore., 
Shenker first encountered psycholo- 
gy during high school when he took 
a class at the local college. He found 
the class interesting, but it was not 
until later that he realized that he 
wanted to be a psychologist. 

"I had always enjoyed my psy- 
chology class, but it had never 
occurred to me that I could take 
that enjoyment and make it into an 
education and a career," said 
Shenker "One day, though, I liter- 
ally said to myself, 'Why not be a 
psychologist?"' 

Shenker went to the Uni\ersiry' 
of Pennsylvania where he double 
majored in psychology and Isiologi- 
cal basis of beha\'ior. After his 
freshman year of college Shenker 
worked with a neuropsychologist. 
This experience con\inced him to 
focus on neuroscience and the l)io- 
logical aspects of ]3sychology. 

Shenker had already iulfilled his 
teaching reciuirement at the U of I, 
l)ut \\v chose to contiiuie teaching 
Ibi many reasons. He wanted to 
gi\c students the educational ex])e- 
rience tliat lie would ha\e w.uUcil 



from a teacher. He regards his stu- 
dents as peers rather than as anoth- 
er generation. In addition, Shenker 
had practical reasons for wanting to 
interact with students. 

"I need to learn how to get along 
well with a lot of people from dif- 
ferent backgrounds, with different 
ideas and values," said Shenker 

Shenker's most embarrassing 
moment was when he taught a class 
before 200 students with his fiy 
open. One student tried to tell him 
that his fly was open before class by 
giving him a note, but he put it in 
his pocket without reading it. 

Shenker had a lot of advice to 
offer psychology majors. "Don't just 
wait for teachers or books to come 
to you and tell you what to do. 
Instead, go after things and make 
them happen.'" 

After he graduates, Shenker 
plans on continuing to teach as well 
as conducting research, ha\ing clin- 
ical medical acti\"ity and publisiiing 
scientific papers. 

When he is not teaching, 
Shenker is liusy with research, col- 
lecting and organizing data and 
writing for psychology textbooks. In 
addition, Shenker s])ends a lot ot 
time with his wile and two d.uigh- 
ters. He enjoys barbecuing with his 
friends and lamily, going out to eat 
and phning i)asketball, 

"I lo\e basketball so I usually go 
to the mini i;. lines .nid ])la\' from 
time to tunc at I.MIM'.."" said 
Slienkcr. 



Joel Shenker 




126 



Academics 








n his office in the 
Psychology Building, 
Joel Shenker tends to 
nuiny activities. He spends his day 
teaching, going to class and con- 
ducting research. 



-Paul Grano 





ccwhing a Psychology 
100 class, Joel 
Shenker lectures on his 
favorite subject — neuroscience. 
Shenker is pursuing two doctoral 
degrees here at the U of I. 



-Paul Grano 



Joel Shenker 



127 



Dare to Care 



Training 

Students for 

Workshops 



''Acquaintance rape is an 
issue that many people 
are thinking about and 
these workshops are 
serving a definite need by 
addressing this issue. '' 



Story by 

Emma Brennan 



Layout by 

Colleen Christensen 



C.A.R.E. (Campus Acquaintance Rape 
Education) was a community health class at 
L' of I that trained male and female luider- 
graduates to facilitate acquaintance rape 
workshops. These workshops were held in a 
\ariery of campus locations including frater- 
nities, sororities, residence halls and class- 
rooms. 

"I got invohed with this class because I feel 
that it is one of the few programs at the U of 
I where you see people's opinions changing as 
a result of the class and a real difference is 
made in people's li\es," said Dan Goitein, 
sophomore in LAS. 

C.A.R.E. was one of the first semester- 
long programs in the country to teach rape 
pre\'ention with an explicitly feminist orienta- 
tion. C.A.R.E. addressed rape as a culturally 
based problem. It attempted to dispel the 
socially accepted m\ths that continued the 
subordination of women. This was accom- 
plished by ha\ing a variety of guest speakers 
lecture on the subjects of power and pri\ilege. 
cultural oppression and gender socialization. 
This class also showed the connection 
between media and sexual \ictimization with 
a pornography slide show and an analysis of 
advertisements. 

"I liked this class because it wasn't just 
about the \ictim and assailant," said Lisa 
Rosenfeld, senior in LAS. "Instead, we talked 
about our culture and how oiu" society jjro- 



duces rapists." 

Panels of rape sur\i\ors and significai 
others of sur\i\-ors spoke to the class aboi 
their experiences. These presentations wei 
essential to the class' education because th( 
allowed the students an opportunirs' to s( 
these issues on a more personal le\'el. 

C.A.R.E. instructors encouraged studen 
to further their education on acquaintanc 
rape through their participation in Take Ba( 
The Night. This exent, held in .\pril f( 
National Sexual Assault Awareness Monti 
included rallying and .speeches intended i 
increase community awareness of the issue i 
acquaintance rape. 

Facilitation skills were taught to C.A.R.] 
students at the end of the semester T'ik 
recei\ed training in leadership skills and pul 
lie speaking to improxe their presentatic 
ai^ilities. Student presentations ga\e C.A.R.] 
participants an opportunirv' to prepare fi 
possible questions or problems that wou 
arise in an actual workshop situation. 

"I enjo\' being a workshop facilitati 
because I am encouraged by the audience 
responses, people seem to be really interest< 
in the subject matter and that gi\es me a got 
feeling," said Brad Ciuyot. junior in L\ 
"Acquaintance rape is an issue that many |3ei 
\)\e are thinking al^out and these worksho] 
are ser\ing a definite need by addressing til 
issue." 



Rape Education 



128 



Academics 



jiftfegBiiiMiHBBiStt tt ^^ 






iscussing the objectifi- 
cation of women in the 
media, Lauren 
MeGrath, senior in LAS, Sandra 
Urbanik, senior in LAS and 
Jennifer Longawa, junior in LAS 
use magazine artieles to prove their 
point. CA.R.E. was one of the 
first semester- long programs to 
teach rape prevention with an 
explicit/]' feminist orientation. 

CA.R.E. instructor, 
Chevon Kothari, trains 
students in leadership 
skills and public speaking to 
improve their presentation abilities. 
They encourage students to further 
their education on acquaintance 
rape through their participation in 
Take Back the Mght. 




-Jill Kogan 



-Jill Kogan 



Community Health 240 



129 



Creepy Cra wlers 



STUDENTS EXPLORE 

THE WORLD OF 

INSECTS 



'77/ never forget the 
waxworms we ate. They 
tasted like french fries. I 
was too scared to try the 
barbequed insects, but I 
enjoyed the mint 
grasshopper sucker '' 



Story by 
Emma Brennan 



Layout by 
Jill Kogan 



The average U of I student does 
not even know what the word ento- 
mology means. The study of bugs? 
Any student who took an entomolo- 
gy course could tell you that the first 
thing taught is the distinction that 
entomology is the study of insects 
and not the study of bugs. 

According to Dan Guyot, teach- 
ing assistant to Introduction to 
Applied Entomology, the majority 
of students in upper level entomol- 
ogy classes are either in horticulture 
or agronomy. The introductory 
entomology courses, on the other 
hand, draw students from many dif- 
ferent majors on campus. 

"I took this class because I am an 
education major and I thought that 
it would be more applicable to my 
field to learn about insects rather 
than biology because litde children 
are more excited to talk about 
insects as opposed to DNA, since 
they see insects everyday," said Kim 
Abruzino, sophomore in Education. 

Topics broached in these classes 
included discussions on the positive 
effects of insects on our economy, 
the use of insects in establishing the 
time of death of a murder victims 
and how insects are used in the 
medical field. 

"I liked the class on 'killer" bees 
because Professor Berenbaum pro- 
vided me with information that dis- 
pelled the myth of the bees" poten- 
tial as killers," said Mike 
Trawczynski, senior in C^BA. 

Man\' cnionioloi'A' classes are 



accompanied by a lab session. In 
these lab sessions students had the 
opportunity to get hands-on experi- 
ence working with and identifying 
insects. These labs ranged from 
candle making to honey sampling 
to insect classification. An edible 
insect lab was the most memorable 
class for many students. 

"I'll never forget the waxworms 
we ate. They tasted like french fries. 
I was too scared to try the barbe- 
qued insects, but I enjoyed the mint 
grasshopper sucker," said Abruzino. 

Other insects that were available 
to the students for sampling includ- 
ed tea made from ants, a Hot Licks 
tequila sucker with a worm inside 
and caterpillar pupae. 

Entomology students also went 
on field trips to the nearby tracts of 
land owned by the U of I. Out by 
the South Farms students had the 
opportunity to visit the bee and 
mosquito farms. 

Indoor insectaries — controlled 
environment rooms — were also 
explored by entomology students. 
The state insect collection, consist- 
ing of more than ii\e million speci- 
mens, was located in tiie Illinois 
Natural History Surxey in 
Champaign. This extensi\'e collec- 
tion allowed students to see insects 
irom all oxer the world. 

"I really enjoyed this class 
because it ga\e me material I had 
lU'xcr studietl l)elori' in an\ iitiici 
class," said SyKie nchnuu-y. so|)ho- 
more in I'dmalion. 



Entomology 



130 



Academics 



'MikmssssBii^Bs^siiSBsiBess^. 






eering through the 
microscope, Tara 
Wesley, senior in LAS, 
looks at the head of a butterfly. 
Her partner, Michael Valadez, 
senior in LAS, reads the identifica- 
tion characteristics. 

Madagascar hissing 
cockroach rests on the 
hand of Erin 
Dominiak, senior in LAS. Many 
entomology classes are accompa- 
nied by a lab session where stu- 
dents have the opportunity to get 
hands-on experience working with 
and identifing insects. 




-Peter Mackay 



-Peter mackay 



Entomology Classes 



131 





his student receives 
advice from an advisor 
ill the Engineering 
Counseling Center Career Services 
ojfers students help with many 
things, ranging from interviewing 
skills to job placement. 



-Dave Moser 



132 



Academics 



MiofimmaKElsasimsssf 



1 



He lp Wanted? 



In the worst-case scenario it is 
May and you are pinnina; on your 
mortar board. Then you wonder 
what you are going to do after your 
graduation ceremony. You trek 
o\er an imfamiliar path to the 
Turner Student Services Building 
to beg Career Services personnel 
for help in job placement. They 
offer a plethora of workshops, one- 
on-one counseling, computer pro- 
grams, graduate school informa- 
tion and internship and employ- 
ment listings. They tailor the \'ari- 
ety of their services to the diverse 
needs of U of I students. 

"It depends on where a student 
is in their own career which ser- 
vices they use the most," said 
Margaret Schrock, Career Ser\'ices 
assistant director. 

"We do like to work with stu- 
dents all through their years, not 
just with seniors," Schrock said. 

Schrock said most students do 
not realize the extent of placement 
services they cover. Based on the 
third floor of the student sendees 
building, the Career Serxices 
Center branches out to the place- 
ment offices of college depart- 
ments. 

"We are more than a placement 
center because we have a lot of 
other services," Schrock said. 

Career Services has also 
expanded its programs with a 



mock inter\iew and an externship 
programs. The externship pro- 
gram, begun in 1994, targets 
sophomores and juniors and pro- 
vides them with an opportunity to 
shadow a mentor in their desired 
career field lor a week. 

"We try to simulate the job 
search process," Schrock said. 

The Career Services fall 1995 
program line-up included: 
Choosing a Major, Summer 
Internships: Start Early and 
Transforming a Major into a 
Career. 

Dave Kosanke, junior in 
Engineering, came to find some- 
thing out of the ordinary to mesh 
with his environmental engineer- 
ing major. He paged through 
Careers for Animal Lovers and 
Other Zoological Tiy'pes and Jobs 
in Paradise. 

"I'm looking for something of[~ 
beat, something dilferent and fun," 
said Kosanke. 

Other first-time visitors. Amy 
Siwek, senior in Agriculture, and 
Shefali Desai, senior in 
Agriculture, came seeking gradu- 
ate school information. 

"Another student recommend- 
ed that I come here," Siwek said. 

If the ultimate job search or the 
search for that ideal internship 
seems a bit scary, try visiting the 
Career Services Center. 



MORE THAN JUST 
A PLACEMENT 
OFFICE 



"// depends on where a 
student is in their own 
career which services they 
use the most. '^ 



Story by 
Chuan-Lin Alice Tsai 

Layout by 
Emma Brennan 



Career Services 



Career Services Center 



133 



A New World 



Discovery classes 

offer more than 

homework 



''There are only ten peo- 
ple and my professor 
takes time out to tell us 
about the campus. Also, 
since the class is agrono- 
my, we get to sample 
foods and listen to speak- 
ers from the wheat and 
corn industry.'' 



Story by 
Pamela Riley 



Layout by 
Jill Kogan 



It is the first day of your new life 
— you are finally a freshman at the 
U of I. You wake up early on the 
first day of class to make sure you 
have time to get dressed and eat a 
good breakfast so you can make a 
great impression on your teachers 
and peers. When you get to class 
you realize there are 1,000 other 
students who look just as lost as you 
do. You are probably never going to 
meet anyone in your classes. 

For many students this is the case 
on the first day of classes. Does it 
have to be this way? Maybe not. 
Since the beginning of last year, dis- 
covery courses have been offered at 
the U of I. Targeting the freshmen 
class, these sections are smaller, 
friendlier and are used to encourage 
students and teachers to engage in 
discussion and to form close rela- 
tionships. Many discovery classes 
are just modified sections of a regu- 
larly offered class. 

"I like Spanish 200 because every- 
one listens and knows each other," 
said Becca Ewing, freshman in LAS. 

Many classes at the U of I are 
notorious for being enormous. The.se 
large classes, such as Economics 102, 
now have smaller discovery class sec- 
tions. Besides these classes, however, 
many new classes iia\'e been created 
specifically for the discovery pro- 
gram. Theater 199 and Agronomy 
1 99 are examples of this. They only 
meet one hour a week and tiiey just 
touch on tlic l()])ic so students cm 
get a feel for it. 

"It's my favorite class," said 



Carrie Metrick, freshman in La\S. 
"There are only ten people and my 
professor takes time out to tell us 
about the campus. Also, since the 
class is agronomy, we get to sample 
foods and listen to speakers from 
the wheat and corn industry." 

Many discovery classes ha\'e 
speakers come in to talk to the stu- 
dents. Theater 199 has directors, 
costume designers and actors come 
talk to the class. 

"I lo\'ed Theater 1 99," said Kim 
Garr, sophomore in LAS. "Nancy 
Hovasse was my teacher and she 
was great. We learned a lot without 
being loaded down with work. I 
learned more than I do in most of 
my classes." 

The most positi\e feedback came 
from students who had taken discox- 
ery classes geared toward actuall}' dis- 
covering a new subject, as opposed to 
classes that were just smaller sections 
of a normally offered class. 

"I'm taking Symbols in 
Aidiropology" said Betli Townsend, 
freshman in EA\. "It's not really 
hard, but since the class is so small 
the teacher will know il I'm not 
there. Since it's a normal three hour 
class I can't blow it off. It's not 
always fun and sometimes it's a lot 
ol work." 

E\en tiiougli tliere were some 
gripes about the disco\ei"\' classes, 
most people seem pleased to ha\T 
taken tlicin. So far these classes 
iia\e only l)i'fn olVered for two 
wars. l)ut it looks like lht'\ arc here 
to Slav 





DISCOVERY 




134 



Academics 



ysses$^ 






dance instructor 
demonstrates proper 
form and technique in 
a relaxed classroom setting. Many 
students cite smaller classes and 
easier access to instructors as rea- 
sons/or registering for discovery 
classes. 

reshmen participate in 
a discovery class in the 
studios at Krannert 
Center. These sections are smaller, 
friendlier and are used to encourage 
students and teachers to engage in 
discussion and to form close rela- 
tionships. 




-Paul Grano 



-Paul Grano 



Discovery Classes 



135 





hese Biology 120 lab 
partners work together 
to dissect a crawfish. 

Many students prefer biology labs 

over boring lectures. 

n the Natural History 
Building, Colleen 
Brown, senior in LAS, 
cleans out an aquarium. The basic 
concepts of lectures are emphasized 
in biology labs. 




-Paul Grano 




P'Alil l".KAN> 



136 Academics 



imssmsmisaaliiaisBsis^ 






Mad Scientists 



Whfu most students tliink of 
biology labs, tlicy proiiably are 
unfamiliar of what aetually goes on 
in those labs. The truth about biol- 
ogy labs is that undergraduates may 
encounter one of the best learning 
experiences in their educational 
careers. The labs are not just long, 
boring exercises that undergradu- 
ates are forced to do. Most are fun 
and interesting, as the student has 
the opportunity to explore areas of 
life others will never have the 
chance to see. Both broad, simple 
topics and specific, technical 
research are covered in biology labs. 

Andrew Cah'ert, sophomore in 
LAS, said "Biology labs benefited 
me because they enforced the con- 
cepts that I learned in class." 

The basic concepts that the 
students learned in class are 
emphasized in these labs. Biology 
students learn about broad topics 
such as genetics, with labs where 
students simulated how genes 
replicate. Students also simulated 
the way traits are passed on in 
generations of a certain species 
through the use of computer pro- 
grams. These interesting labs 
work to a student's advantage in 
giving him or her something con- 
crete to remember when taking or 
studying for a test. 

As a biology student takes higher 
level classes, the labs become more 



specific. This may be due to the fact 
that in lower lexcl classes students 
are still learning the technic|ues that 
one uses in die laborator)'. In the high- 
er level classes, the work becomes a 
more hands-on experience. 

"In my research lab, Fm learn- 
ing more about genetics than I ever 
did in class," said James Figura, 
senior in LAS. 

There are many interesting pro- 
jects that biology students 
encounter. One such lab has stu- 
dents monitoring the beating of a 
frog's heart by using electrodes. 
Students also learn about the anato- 
my of many different animals and 
compare their systems in relation to 
form and function. 

Biology students benefit in many 
ways from the labs that they per- 
form. Students learn to be intuitive 
and to come up with alternative 
explanations when results do not 
come out as they were predicted. 

"One of the best things I learned 
that will help me after I graduate, is 
how to write clear, precise lab 
reports, even when things do not go 
as planned," said Albert Enrique, 
junior in LAS. 

Those who spend much of their 
undergraduate careers in the labo- 
ratory are ultimately gaining many 
academic skills. The most impor- 
tant thing is they have fun while 
they gain this experience. 



LABS PROVIDE AN 
ESCAPE FROM LEG 
TURES 



'^Of the best things I 
learned that will help me 
after I graduate, is how 
to write clear, precise lab 
reports, even when things 
do not go as planned. '' 



Story by 
Rick Lawrence 



Layout by 
Emma Brennan 



Biology Labs 



Biology Labs 



137 



Mechanics of It 



Giving valuable 

experience to the 

community 



''The experience is 
designed to give students 
the opportunity to use 
what they have learned in 
their courses. It also cre- 
ates an excellent educa- 
tional opportunity. '' 









Story by 

Debbie Williams 

Layout by 
Amara rozgus 



In addition to their regular 
coursework, students in the 
Mechanical and Industrial 
Engineering programs must partici- 
pate in a Senior Capstone Design 
Experience. This experience allows 
students to design various types of 
equipment for corporations and 
individual organizations in the com- 
munity, including adaptive equip- 
ment for persons with disabilities. 
This year, at least two groups of stu- 
dents worked on such projects. 

This design experience is 
required of seniors in both engi- 
neering programs. The course is 
entitled Mechanical Engineering 
280 or Industrial Engineering 280. 
The students must take this course 
to fulfill both a graduation require- 
ment as well as an accreditation 
requirement. Students were put 
into groups of three based on a 
written application that included 
information on past experiences 
and interests, and from there they 
chose from a list of design opportu- 
nities. Students had the whole 
semester to design this project. 

The teams were not on their 
own, though. Each team met with a 
faculty support group approximate- 
ly once every three weeks. These 
meetings were called milestones. 
The faculty members gave feedback 
on the proposal and design and pro- 
vided any information that might 
help each group with the project. 
The students also attended a lab 



section where teaching assistants 
were assigned to help the three or 
four different teams. 

"The groups of students are 
given as much or as litde help as 
they feel they need," said John 
Nowak, director of the Institute for 
Competitive Manufacturing. "The 
experience is designed to give stu- 
dents the opportunity to use what 
they have learned in their courses. It 
also creates an excellent educational 
experience before graduation." 

A portable wheelchair stationary 
trainer and a switch operated rock- 
ing chair are just some examples of 
the projects that were constructed 
for persons with disabilities in the 
community. 

Chih Liang, senior in 
Engineering, said, "In doing this 
project, we get a good idea of what 
it will be like to work in the real 
world. We are required to define the 
needs of various people and design 
something to meet those needs. We 
also get the chance to work with 
other people and use each others' 
strengths and compensate for each 
others' weaknesses." 

"I think there are many benefits 
in doing this t^qDe of project," said 
Cortney Guzlas, senior in 
Engineering. "First of all, we arc 
helping inembers of the community'. 
Secondly, we liaw the opportunity to 
use our knowledge about control sys- 
tems and get experience with work- 
ing in teams and planning ahead." 






ENGINEERING 



138 



Academics 



i^miswSL 




-Peter Mackay 





esigning a project on 
the computer, Chad 
Johnson, Courtney 
Guzlas and Kevin Sawatzky, 
seniors in Engineering, work on its 
design. The computer can simulate 
motion and calculate sizes and 
weights of materials they use. 

echanical engineering 
seniors Chad Johnson, 
Courtney Guzlas and 
Kevin Sawatzky wait outside the 
design studio where they work on 
their engineering projects. The stu- 
dents must take this course to ful- 
fill a graduation as well as an 
accredititation requirement. 




-PETER MACKAY 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



139 



Common Ground 



Engineering and 

agriculture 

tradition 



"Seeing departments bring 
out their very best and 
seeing all the different 
groups, textile and appar- 
el, marketing, foods and 
nutrition, agricultural 
companies and their press 
relations. Seeing all these 
groups coming together 
makes people realize the 
opportunities that fall 
within the College of 
Agriculture's domain.'' 



Story by 

Stephen Wunderlich 

Layout by 

Leila Anne Crawford 



On March 3 and 4, 1995, the College of 
Engineering Open House (EOH) celebrated 
its 75th anni\ersary. Being the largest uni- 
\ersit)' open house in the United States, U of 
I College of Engineering staff and students 
alike are justifiably proud of this e\ent's 
growth and prestige. An estimated 25,000 
people visited the 1995 EOH. The design 
projects of more than 800 grade school stu- 
dents and 12 high schools were judged by 90 
professors and alumni. 

According to Rebecca Silver, adxisor for 
the EOH planning committee and assistant 
to the dean of Engineering, last year's EOH 
was "the best one Fve seen yet. Part of it was 
the weather was so good. The turnout was 
fantastic. Exhibits were high caliber and the 
students were very enthusiastic." 

Treasurer Courtney Acker, junior in 
Engineering, enjoyed the "Crater Conquest," 
the college design contest in which more than 
50 teams competed, including three teams 
from outside uni\ersities (Purdue, Georgia 
Tech and University of Michigan). 

Held on Saturday night after Open 
House festi\'ities had concluded, St. Patrick 
Ball was a knighting ceremony for the 
Knights of St. Patrick. Future EOH "96 
Chairperson Jet-Sun Lin, junior in 
Engineering, took photographs for the slide 
show presented at St. Pat's Ball, and also 
lielped out witli tlie committees last year. 

Lin explained the knighting was "in 
honor of the Knigiits of St. Patrick, ihc 
])atron saint ol engineering" and lliat liiose 
kniulited were recei\ini2 "\hv hiuliesi honors 



in the College of Engineering." 

The third and fourth of March, 1995, 
also marked the sixth anni\ersary of the 
College of Agriculture Open House (AOH). 
Attendance has grown e\ery year for their 
event (coordinated to be held jointly with 
EOH, though in different locations), and 
more than 21,000 people attended in 1995. 
AOH '95 was held in the Stock Pa\ilion and 
the Plant Sciences Laboratory and 
Greenhouses as well as many other loca- 
tions. Associate Director Jeffrey Brown in the 
newly-named College of Agricultural, 
Consumer and En\ironmental Sciences 
(ACES) said that di\-ersity was the selling 
point of this event. Exhibits from the 
Agricultural Engineering Department 
ranged from displays of amazing technology 
to petting zoos. 

Senior in Agriculture Meg ^Vebster co- 
chaired last year's AOH for the third year in 
a row. She felt that the best part of AOH "95 
was showing others what tlie College of 
Agriculture was all about. "Seeing depart- 
ments bring out their very best and seeing all 
tlie different groups, textile and apparel, 
marketing, foods and nutiition. agricultural 
companies and their press relations. Seeing 
all these groups coming together makes peo- 
]3le realize the opportunities that fall within 
(he College of .\griculture"s domain," 
Webster said. 

Botli EOH -95 and AOH '95 were e.xeni- 
])huy models of the best that their respectixe 
colleges (Engineering and .\griculture . .i.s 
we'll as this uni\ersii\. has to oiler. 



Open Houses 



140 



Academics 






o^ 



*'<, 








¥^ 










r" /, /'. 



•-^--^.^^"*r' 





-Mike Giebelhausen 

member 
of the 
Rodeo 
Club shows children 
how to rope and 
lasso. Children from 
the community are 
offered the opportunity 
to try many new 
things at the 
Agriculture open 
house. 



-Dave wolkowitz 



boy puts his arm 

into a cow's rumen. 

The animal sciences 

department provides 

cannulated cows for 

every open house. 



Dave Wolkowitz 

articipants 
in the 
College of 
Engineering's open 
house examine a total 
survey station. The 
College of Engineering 
holds its open house 
concurrently with the 
College of Agriculture. 



Open Houses 



141 





ssistant Dean Jesse 
Thompson in the 
College of 
Agricultural, Consumer and 
Environmental Sciences, talks with 
Rebecca Ross. Ross, senior in ani- 
mal sciences, is preparing to gradu- 
ate and is seeking advice from her 
dean. 

ophomore in 
Agriculture Tara Ooms 
looks over her records 
with Assistant Dean Rebecca 
McBride. The College of 
Agriculture is headquartered at 
room 1 04 Mumford Hall. 




-Peter Macka' 




Peter Macka- 



142 



Academics 



^missssii^sis am k imii ^s^: 



Cha nge of Face 



Agriculture. If you are like most, 
thoughts are coming to mind of 
cows, corn, farmers and fields. 
Agriculture is for farmers. 

How about those who go to col- 
lege and major in agriculture? They 
want to be farmers, right? Why else 
would they major in agriculture? 
Agriculture is for farmers. 

Now erase every image you just 
had in your mind and listen to the 
facts. The number of individual 
farmers decreases each year. 
Technology and efficiency causes 
more farmers to sell their opera- 
tions to larger farms. The idea of a 
"family farm" is dying. 

Less than one third of the stu- 
dents entering the U of I in the 
College of Agriculture are from 
farms, according to Dean Charles 
Olson, assistant dean for the col- 
lege. Students are becoming mar- 
keting speciahsts, engineers, labora- 
tory analysts, journalists, nutrition- 
ists and farmers. 

The College of Agriculture at 
the U of I took a major step toward 
eliminating farm stereotypes. In the 
summer of 1995, the college under- 
went restructuring and a name 
change. The new name was "The 
College of Agricultural, Consumer 
and Environmental Sciences." 
According to Olson, the college 
wanted to better represent what 
they did. 

"We're responding to the phe- 
nomenon that farmers are becom- 
ing more efficient," said Olson. 
"There are fewer numbers out 



there involved in production agri- 
culture. We're saying that the col- 
lege is more than production agri- 
culture." 

Cathy Miller, freshman in ani- 
mal sciences, a department in the 
college, agreed. 

"Agriculture has become so 
much more than it used to," Miller 
said. "It's not just livestock and 
crops anymore. Agriculture encom- 
passes a greater market now." 

So where do the consumer and 
environmental parts come in? 
Olson said that the consumer is the 
clientele for all the college does. 

"Illinois is one of the largest food 
processors in the nation," Olson 
said. "We (the college) are also 
involved in getting the food we pro- 
duce into a form the consumer can 
use." 

Changing the name was the first 
step in the direction of change. The 
college also reduced its departments 
from ten to seven, without a loss of 
any academic programs. Olson said 
that there are two reasons for 
restructuring: first to achieve 
administrative efficiency, secondly 
to broaden the clientele. 

"I will have a group of 30 in my 
department instead of six, all with 
ideas for teaching and programs," 
said Gerry Walter, associate profes- 
sor of agriculture communications. 

The restructuring was transpar- 
ent to the students enrolled in the 
college. The number of academic 
advisors and assistant deans stayed 
the same. 



AGRICULTURE 
STEPS INTO THE 
FUTURE 



''We're responding to the 
phenomenon that farmers 
are becoming more 
efficient. There are fewer 
numbers out there 
involved in production 
agriculture. We're saying 
that the college is more 
than production 
agriculture. " 



Story by 
Theresa Boian 



Layout by 
Amara Rozgus 



Agriculture 



College of ag, C & E S 



143 



Motivating Fans 



Continuing the 

tradition of 

excellence 



''Ifs exciting to know 
that a lot of the people in 
the stands support us as 
well as the team. When 
the team starts losing, it's 
our responsibility to keep 
cheering on the players. 
Once we do that, it starts 
a reaction in the crowds. 
It's kind of a psychologi- 
cal thing creating a chain 
reaction. " 



Story by 
Sheowting Lu 



Layout by 
Emma Brennan 



Pro\icling pre-game, half-time and post- 
game entertainment at home football 
games, the Marching Illini stood at the 
forefront of great uni\'ersity bands this year 
^\'ith a unique style combining past tradi- 
tions and contemporary innovations, the 
Marching Illini was recognized by John 
Philip Sousa in the 1920s as the "World's 
Greatest College Band." 

The Marching Illini's 350 participants 
consisted of 260 musicians as well as mem- 
bers of the flag team, Illinettes, baton 
twirlers, two drum majors, staff and Chief 
Illiniwek this year. Auditions held through- 
out the spring and summer were highly 
competiti\e. Selection criteria included 
musical competency and memorization. 

"I auditioned last year when I came 
down in the spring prior to enrollment. 
Finding out that I made the band was a big 
factor in making my decision to come down 
here for school," said trombone player 
Jason Tice, freshman in Engineering. 

According to trumpet player David 
Johnson, sophomore in Engineering, the 
band retained a number of musicians from 
previous years, which made it increasingly 
difTicult for new meml^ers to join. 

"They're very selective. Out of all the 
people who try out, they only want a few of 
the best." saidjohnson. 

For each game, the Marching Illini per- 
formed a unic|ue half-time show. For the 
]ire-game show, they performed the tradi- 
tional pieces "Patiiotic Medley." "Illinois 



Lo)alty" and the fight song. 

"We play a wide varietv' of music. I like 
just about all of it, but I especially like the 
rock and jazzy stuff," said Becky 
Chantome, senior in FA.A. 

M\ the music accompanying the drills 
was written especially for the Marching 
Illini. According to Tice, who wrote the 
Dad's Day routine, he was taken by sur- 
prise when he found out what he had to do 
during the performance. 

"When I wrote the routine, I didn't 
know that I would have to do it with the 
dads in front of the crowd. That was quite 
an interesting experience," said Tice. 
Although practices and performances 
were exhausting at times, band members 
still enjoyed being part of the Big Ten 
atmosphere and having good seats at the 
games. 

"It's exciting to knov\- that a lot of the 
people in the stands support us as well as 
the team," saidjohnson. "When the team 
starts losing, it's our responsibiliu" to keep 
cheering on the players. Once v\e do that, it 
starts a reaction in the crov\ds. Its kind of a 
psychological thing creating a chain reac- 
tion." 

Through the Marching Illini. members 
also made lifelong friendships. 

"I've been in b.md for loin' years <\nd the 
thing I like the most are the people I've 
met. It's also really cool to be involved in a 
competitive sports environment withoiu 
acUKilly phiying." said Chauiome. 



IMarching Illini 



144 



Academics 







Paul Grano 





Iw Alarcliing lllini 
peiform at the 
Homecoming game 
against Northwestern. Marching 
mini's 350 participants consisted 
of 260 musicians as well as 
members of the flag team, 
Illinettes, baton twirlers, two drum 
majors, staff and Chief Illiniwek. 

Marching lllini mem- 
ber plays his trumpet 
during a halftime 
show. The Marching lllini are 
very selective and the auditions that 
are held during the spring and 
summer are highly competitive. 




-Paul Grano 



Marching Illini 



145 



Horsin' Around 



STUDENTS LEARN 

ALL ABOUT 

HORSES 



''I took the class because 
I was interested in horses. 
The hands-on work in 
this class is a great 
experience that you do not 
get in most classes. '' 



^4 



Story by 

Jennifer Arendarczyk 

Layout by 
Jill Kogan and 
Amara Rozgus 



As a fun option to their regular cours- 
es, some animal science students were 
able to partake in a class where they 
trained a young horse, or weanling, 
themsehes. The class was titled Animal 
Science 206, Horse Management. 

This was the second year that students 
took an active role in the early training of 
a weanling. Ke\'in Kline took o\'er the 
instruction of this class from Heidi 
Brady. Brady had started the hands-on 
class in the fall of 1994. She modeled the 
class after a similar one at Texas A&AI 
University. 

"I took the class because I was inter- 
ested in horses," said Kathy Kallmann, 
senior in Agriculture. "The hands-on 
work in this class is a great experience 
that you do not get in most classes." 

"I enrolled in the class because I was 
interested in horses, but could not own 
one," added Susan Voss, senior in 
Agriculture. 

People in the class were divided up 
into teams. Each team consisted of two 
people who had a weanling to share. The 
students were required to train the wean- 
ling in some basic handling procedures 
such as being lead around ii)' a halter and 
ijeing loaded into a trailer. The students 
also acquainted their weanlings to l^eing 
aroomed. 



The class culminated into a show dur- 
ing the month of No\ember. The stu- 
dents w-ere asked to demonstrate what 
they ha\'e taught their weanling over the 
past few months. 

The class format began with lectures 
on behavior modification. Then, stu- 
dents were assigned to their weanlings so 
they could put into practice what they 
had learned in class. The class needed 
the background on how horses think 
before they were able to properly handle 
one. 

Voss, who had little prior experience 
with horses often deferred to her partner, 
Carrie Peterson. Peterson, junior in 
Agriculture, had about 12 years of horse 
experience. 

'"It is fun working with the young 
horses," Peterson said, "especially since 
e\ery horse is different." 

Kline also lectured on areas of horse 
management such as reproduction, exer- 
cise requirements and the nutritional 
needs of the horse. 

"I hope students gain a combination 
of practical and science based informa- 
tion." Kline said. 

If there was one thing the students 
would walk away with after taking this 
course was the knowledge that they 
lieljjcd train .i young horse. 



Horse: Management 



146 



Academics 



'^HH0KHaBBQ^^Rffi^B^mH9RwC' 




ifting Ins iveanlini^s upper 
lip, .\athan Jurgena, 
senior in Agriculture, 
checks llie led//. Students must handle 
their horses on a regular basis to get 
iheni used to human contact. 

)t the round corral, 
Carrie Peterson, junior in 
Agriculture, works with 
her weanling. This corral is used to 
help students with problematic wean- 
lings. 




' 



w 



-Paul grano 

cirtners Herman Bae, 

sophomore in 

Agriculture, and Susan 
Davis, senior in Agriculture, work 
together to train their weanling. 
The U of I owns and operates the 
South Farms, which includes the 
horse farm. 



-Paul Grano 



Horse Management 



147 



Academics 



i 



Temple Hoyne Buell 

The U of I School of Architecture owes 
much thanks to Temple Hoyne Buell. A 
1916 graduate of the U of I, Buell went on 
to become a prominent Denver architect. 
He gained a reputation for having a 
"Western Style" in building design, a style 
that uses brick as decoration. In Denver, 
he designed the Federal Reserve Bank. In 
1974, Buell donated money to the U of I 
for renovations of the main hall and 
gallery of the School of Architecture. Buell 
also donated $6 million for the construc- 
tion of a new building for the School of 
Architecture. The Temple Hoyne Buell 
Hall houses the graduate architecture pro- 
gram and parts of landscape architecture 
and urban and regional planning. 



Varied Class Sizes 

The U of I offers a wide variety of 
classes to students. Being a large 
school, the U of I is notorious for 
its large lecture courses. Classes 
such as Chemistry 101 has more 
than 300 students and Economics 
102 has more than 1,500 students. 
Although they are not the norm, 
the U of I also offers small classes 
and some tutorials where an under- 
graduate has the opportunity to 
work individually with a professor. 
These classes are usually reserved 
for upperclassmen. However, hon- 
ors courses allow freshmen to have 
-•similar opportunities for individual 
attention. 





•^^ 



148 Academics 



11 



I 



Libraries 





i 


1 ' , 1 


^1] 






-L__ 


'-^Mi 




T^^ ■«* 


.H 


B"^' 


^^^H'j 




e 





In 1868, a $1,000 state appropriation allowed the 
U of I library to open its doors with 644 books 
and government pamphlets. Currently, more than^' 
40 libraries are located across campus, and the U 
of I now owns more than $14 million in items. 
The U of I library system is known for its diversity 
as well as for its volume. The Rare Book and 
Special Collections Library is home to a complete 
first edition of James Audubon's classic, "The 
Birds of America." The U of I is the holder of the 
third largest collection of Slavic and East European 
titles at a North American libraiy. In addition, the 
U of I libraiy system holds one of the largest col- 
lections of books printed before the year 1501. 
Akhough the U of I libraries house many old pub- 
lications, they are also keeping up with technolo- 
gy by having the Online Catalog, the first comput- 
erized catalog to sei've as the primaiy access to a 
large academic library. 

ccso 



Extensive computer facilities and 
services are available to all students 
at the U of I. The Computing and 
Communications Services Office 
(CCSO) includes ten computer sites 
across campus that offer more than 
580 machines to U of I students. 
These computer sites are dedicated 
to research in the social sciences. 
CCSO sites also offer free computer 
training to undergraduates. More 
than 20 classes are available to 
teach skills associated with the 
Internet, spreadsheets and word 
processing. 





Nobel Prize Winners 

Many U of I graduates and professors 
have won Nobel Prizes. In 1943, 
Edward Doisy, who received a bach- 
elor's degree from U of I in 1914, 
won a prize for physiology and med- 
icine. In 1955, Vincent du Vigneaud 
won a Nobel Prize in chemistry for 
his work on hormones. He graduated 
from U of I in 1923. John Bardeen, 
who was a U of I professor of 
physics and electrical engineering 
from 1951 to 1975, won two Nobel 
Prizes for physics in 1956 and 1972. 
In 1977, Rosalyn Yalow won a Nobel 
Prize fc^r medicine and physiology. 
She graduated from U of I in 1942. 




Big Ten 



149 



I 



James Brady 

John Hinckley made an assassination attempt on 
Ronald Reagan in March of 1981. James Brady, White 
TToiise Press Secretaiy during this time, was the vic- 

ra in this unfortunate incident. This shooting inci- 
( ,L!pIed with the shooting of James and Sarah 

1 ..J\ s son, Scott, in 1985, caused the two to 
. ccome advocates of gun control. The Brady Bill of 
1987 called for a seven day waiting period to permit 
background checks on individuals wishing to pur- 
chase handguns. James Brady graduated from U of I 
in 1962, and his actions in the fight to stop handgun 
violence earned him an Alumni Achievement Award 
in 1991. 




John Strohm 



A graduate of the U of I in 1935, John Strohm went on 
to become a renowned author and editor. Strohm is 
best remembered as a founding editor of National 
Wildlife magazine as well as an editor of Ford 
Almanac. He wrote many travel articles recording his 
experiences as he journeyed throughout Latin America, 
China and the Soviet Union. For these writings, he 
received an Overseas Press Club award in 1959, the 
President's award in 1978 and two Pulitzer Prize nomi- 
nations. Strohm's accomplishments also included him 
seiving as a speech writer and agricultural advisor to 
D wight D. Eisenhower. Strohm received the Alumni 
Achievement Award in 1983. 

Krannert 



Krannert Center for the Performing Aits is a cultural 
center for the Midwest as well as for the U of I. As a 
$21 million gift from 1912 U of I graduate Herman C. 
Krannert, this center first opened in April 1969. 
Designed by Max Abramovitz, a U of I alumnus, 
Krannert Center for the Performing Arts includes a 
Greek style amphitheater that seats 560 and a Great 
Hall that can accommodate a full symphony orchestra 
and chorus on the stage. Herman C. Krannert. an 
Indiana industrialist, said that his contributions to the 
school are in "recognition of what the University of 
Illinois did for me." 





ISO 



Academics 







Foellinger 

Helene Foellinger graduated from U of I in 1932, with 
a degree in mathematics. While attending the U of I, 
Foellinger worked for the Daily Illini for four years and 
became the Woman's Editor her senior year. After grad- 
uation, Foellinger went to work for the Fort Wayne 
News Sentinel. Through her accomplishments, she 
became a prominent business and civic leader, presi- 
dent of the News Publishing Company and publisher 
of the News Sentinel. In 1974, Foellinger became the 
first woman to be named to the Indiana Journalism 
Hall of Fame. Throughout her life, Foellinger was very 
philanthropic. She donated $3 million to the U of I to 
remodel its auditorium. Her donation allowed renova- 
tions to take place on the auditorium's dome, gallery 
and interior. 



Beckman 



There are many opportunities for research at the U of I. The Beckman 
Institute for Advanced Science and Technology is one facility where U of 
I researchers from 12 academic departments address fundamental ques- 
tions in the areas of engineering, physical, biological and behavioral sci- 
ences. Alumnus, Arnold O. Beckman, who graduated in 1922, donated 
$40 million for this building, the largest gift ever given to a public univer- 
sity. Funding for this building also came from the state, federal govern- 
ment anci corporations. The highly sophisticated offices and laboratories 
in Beckman are used to make advances in the understanding of human 
and artificial intelligence. Beckman houses the most extensive and power- 
ful computer network on campus. 





Big Ten 



151 



W^U^T 




1sii^smBasas6i^issms^* 



'i#^ 





S ports 



Dan Ryan, Editor 

When you look at a mosaic, the individual tiles are often lost in the 
whole picture, especially when an infinite number of images can be 
formed when thinking of Illinois' 100-year association with the Big Ten. 
An awe-inspiring number of legendary sports icons, from those that 
pioneered their sport to those that carried the torch for others, have 
walked this campus in the last century. Yet each season, new pieces are 
added to this mosaic that has come to represent Illinois sports. 

This year was certainly no exception as several programs continued 
to climb the ladder ending in national prominence. And Orange and Blue 
backers can thank some legendary coaches for the continuing 
resurgence. 

For starters, Mike Hebert guided an unknown volleyball team and 
super sophomore Erin Borske all the way to the Sweet Sixteen of the 
NCAA Tournament. Not bad for a youthful team that was faced with an 
alleged reloading year before the fall semester even began. 

One of the winningest active coaches around, Lou Henson, signed his 
smallish players to fast-breaking contracts that enabled the team to 
rise to twelfth in the national polls. 

Respected coach Theresa Grentz's arrival in Champaign translated 
into instant respectability for a women's basketball program that had 
previously been unable to escape the lower division of the Big Ten. 

Perhaps the brightest star on the Illinois coaching horizon, wrestling 
coach Mark Johnson injected a belief enthusiasm into the wrestling 
program that enabled his grapplers to reach new heights. He 
accomplished the unthinkable in no time at all by taking a conference 
doormat and molding it into a Top Ten team that is on the doorstep of 
perennial national title contention. 

Track's two Garys, Wieneke and Winckler, once again used their 
innovative training techniques to develop numerous All-Americans and 
talent-laden teams. Winckler's women's squad, spearheaded by national 
titlist Tonya Williams and fellow All-American Carmel Corbett, finished 
fourth in the nation, almost unheard of for a Midwestern university. 

And so this year's tiles will be carefully pieced into the history of Illinois' 
participation in the Big Ten, just as the previous 99 seasons and their 
successes have been placed down. Which is precisely why they deserve a 
closer look in the following pages-so that they may be preserved as tlie 
latest contributions to tlie mosaic's final image. 




By the Numbers 


Ul 




Opp 


14 


Michigan 


38 


31 


Oregon 


34 


9 


Arizona 


7 


7 


East Carolina 





17 


Indiana 


10 


21 


Michigan State 


27 


14 


Northwestern 


17 


26 


Iowa 


7 


3 


Ohio State 


41 


48 


Minnesota 


14 


3 


Wisconsin 


3 


5 Wins 5 Losses ^ 


ITie 




LOOKING 
FOR MORE 

FOOTBALL TEAM SEARCHES FOR ANSWERS AFTER 
FALLING SHORT OF A BOWL OPPORTUNITY 

Story by Dan Ryon • Layout by Amara Rozgus 



For only the second time in 
the last eight years, Illinois' 
football team spent the holi- 
days at home after a frustrating 5-5- 
1 campaign that saw coach Lou 
Tepper's Illini come within a yard 
of possibly going bowling. 
Handcuffed offensively by an inex- 
perienced offensive line for the first 



two-thirds of the season, Illinois 
was forced to a conservative 
approach featuring sophomore run- 
ning back Robert Holcombe. 

A season-long revolving door at 
quarterback between incumbent 
Johnny Johnson and Scott Weaver 
appeared to ground the Illini offense 
as well. The end result was too few 



points for the typically strong 
Illinois defense that featured senior 
Ail-American outside linebackers 
Kevin Hardy and Simeon Rice. 
Illinois wound up 3-4-1 in the Big 
Ten and in a tie for seventh v\ith 
Wisconsin. Once again, the Illini 
lined up against one of the toughest 
schedules in the country. 




I B/f rer-Siveef Sioux 

Noithwcstcni's shir niiinin;^ hcick Darnell Aiifrx cuf.s into flic end zone past fallen Illini 

defenders Kevin Hardy, James \M I limns and Dennis Sfidliniis. Aiilry's I -yard lanehdown nil. 

came on fonrtli down laic in (he fomfli t/iKnicr (Uid i^ave flic Wildcafs a 17-14 vicfory oi 

Illinois' Honu'comin}: 




% Not quite "^"'^ 

Michigan nose tackle William Carr grabs air as Johnny Johnson rolls out in search of an Illini receiver 
Johnson connected on 18 of 31 passes for 191 yards, hut it was not enough as the Wolverines rolled in the 
second half to a 38-14 romp over Illinois. 

MICHIGAN 38 ILLINOIS 14 



A fter a summer of prolonged 
/ \ buildup and hype for this game 
L. JLand Rice's improbable race for 
he Heisman Trophy, only one lived up to 
xpectations. Rice, the rush linebacker 
|vho passed on millions in the NFL to 
'.etum for his senior season, had 1.5 sacks 
lind spent almost as much time in the 
|Volverines' backfield as U-M quarterback 
icott Dreisbach. 

I But Michigan left the Illini in the dust 
jn the second half, bolting to a 38-0 lead 



before waltzing out of Memorial Stadium 
with a 38-14 blowout win. 

■'We got whupped, but I think we can 
play with them any day," quarterback 
Johnny Johnson said. "I feel like Coach 
Tepper- we'd play them tomorrow, we'd 
play them right now-it doesn't matter." 

Trailing only 10-0 at halftime, Illinois 
found itself down 24-0 thanks to two Tim 
Biakabutuka touchdowns before the Illini 
could even catch their breath. And when 
Biakabutuka busted a 35-yard run into the 



end zone with 10:32 still on the clock in the 
third quarter, the Illini were left to play for 
pride, a task made difficult by a green 
offensive line playing in the season opener. 
"It's going to be interesting to find out 
how we respond this week, and usually it's 
not as bad as it seems," Tepper said. "If this 
team has the character I think it has. it's 
going to look at this and each young man 
will look at himself and see how he per- 
fonned. Usually the most improvement is 
between the first and second games." 



Football 



155 



Clear the runway 

Mikki Johnson goes air- 
borne to force Arizona 
receiver Rodney Williams 
out of bounds. The 
defense came up big 
against the Wildcats, scor- 
ing the winning touch- 
down in a hard-fought 
victory. 



OREGON 34 ILLINOIS 31 
ILLINOIS 9 ARIZONA 7 



This was the first of several games that slipped 
out of Illinois" grasp while the victory was 
well within reach. The Illini had travelled to 
Oregon in the Ducks' first home game since their 
Rose Bowl appearance and were poised to escape 
Eugene with a crucial road win. Oregon's workhorse 
tailback. Ricky Whittle, staked the Ducks to an early 
7-0 lead with a 24-yard scamper to paydirt, the first 
of three Whittle touchdowns on the night. 

But the visitors stormed back with 19 unanswered 
points, a run capped by a Bret Scheuplein field goal 
that beat the halftime gun. Whittle and Illini fullback 
Ty Douthard exchanged TD runs in the third quarter 
before things got interesting. When linebacker 
Dennis Stallings returned an interception deep into 
Oregon territory to set up an Illinois touchdown, the 
Illini were staring a road win in the eyes. 

"I saw the ball up in the air and I was thinking to 
myself. 'Man, I hope I don't drop it,'" Stallings said. 
"We don't want to be known as the weak link. That's 
what motivates us-thc great (linebacking) tradition." 

Later in the second half, Holcombe gave Illinois 
an imposing 31-20 lead on Oregon, but the Ducks 
fought through five turnovers to force one of their 
own to decide the game. Johnson was sacked and 
luniblcd into llie end /one. and Oregon pounceil on 
Ihc ball lo go ahead .^4-.^ I wilh jusl o\er six minutes 
let I. 

AllhoUL'h Illinois piil ^ I points up on liie hoani, it 
siill liad In oN'crcome an ottensixe line ihal was siilj 
sulteiing growing pains and an ankle injury dial hin- 
deied Doiuiiaril. .Some timely help from the unit's 
veteiaiis did iioi hint. 

"Ken Ulaeknian and ('luis Koerwil/ iia\e been 



solid, and you would expect that," Tepper said. "Th 
others are not performing the way they or we wan 
them to. We've got to be patient because they couli 
really lose their confidence based upon the stiff com 
petition we've faced." 

In what would become a familiar theme for thi 
year's Illini, the team lacked the offensive firepowe 
to bury an opponent. In this non-conference matchup 
against one of the nation's premiere defenses, ihi 
Illini found a simple way around that-just score oi 
defense. 

Scheuplein drew first blood for Illinois with a 47 
yard field goal at the beginning of the fourth quartei 
After an Arizona score put Illinois in a 7-3 hole 
sophomore linebacker David James scooped up ; 
Wildcat fumble caused by hard-hitting safety Tyroni 
Washington and rumbled 53 yards for the winninj 
score with five minutes left. 

"I thought the ball was down." James confessed 
"Tyrone hit him hard and it didn't look like he hat 
possession, ll bounced into ni\ hands and .\ntwoin( 
(Patton) was yelling. 'Gol' So I started running am 
the crowd was cheering, and I thought 1 might get ; 
touchdown here." 

riie lUini piesMiicd Wildc.u quarterback Dat 
While all afternoon long. Rice and Hardy combinei 
for 3 and 2 sacks respecti\ely. The three for Rice pu 
him over the top as the Big Ten's all-time sackin.istci 

"riuMc's .111 .isMiinpiion out there lh.it on' 
phase won this game, and that's not true, 
lepper said. "Ihe offense was very smart an> 
deliberate in attacking .Xri/ona's defense \N 
alst) needed lo res|>oiui delensnolx with son\ 
iioo<.\ pi, IN oxeiall .iiul lli.il h.ip|H"ned." 



ILLINOIS 7 EAST CAROLINA 
ILLINOIS 17 INDIANA 10 



In an intriguing rematch of the 1994 Liberty Bowl in which 
Ilhnois romped 30-0, the Illini held the Pirates scoreless for 
the eighth straight quarter, although they received a bit of a 
jcare in pulling the plug on the ECU offense this time. After 
riolcombe had punched the ball in from the 1-yard line to put his 
earn up by seven with 9:55 left in the half, it appeared that the 
;ilini might run away and hide in their final tuneup for the Big Ten 
;late. 

But they enjoyed no such luck. In fact, after ECU quarterback 
Vlarcus Crandell found Larry Shannon streaking down the side- 
ine late in the fourth quarter, the Pirates were only 33 yards from 
ying the contest. On second and goal from the Illinois 7, though, 
Duane Lyle saved the day for the Illini by intercepting Crandell in 
he end zone for his third pick on the afternoon. 

"Someone had to step up," Lyle explained. "Usually it's 
Simeon or Kevin who steps up, but we were thinking to ourselves. 
We're players too. Why can't we make the big play?' It was just 
in instinctive play." 

Holcombe's number was called an Illinois-record 49 times and 
le totalled 130 hard-earned yards on the afternoon. The conserv- 
Uive attack drew the ire of an impatient Memorial Stadium gath- 
ering, but not Tepper 

! "You can't get me down, I'm excited," Tepper said. "When 
vou're handicapped and you're working with one hand behind 
/our back, it doesn't help to do a multitude of things and create 



more problems. You can't do all the things that people would like 
you to do." 

The Illini evened their Big Ten record at 1-1 with the road vic- 
tory over the conference doormat Hoosiers. After trading field 
goals in the first quarter, George McDonald reeled in a 25-yard 
TD pass from new starting quarterback Scott Weaver. Weaver 
completed 1 6 for 28 for 2 1 3 yards and two TD tosses. The game- 
winner to Ty Douthard came with over eight minutes left in the 
third quarter to finish the scoring. 

"We put more points on the board than the last couple weeks, 
but 1 made some crucial errors," Weaver acknowledged. "I made 
some plays, I made some bonehead ones. I'm just chalking it up 
as a learning experience." 

Illinois' airtight defense met little resistance in protecting the 
touchdown lead and was able to keep the Hoosiers from crossing 
the 50-yard line the rest of the way. Hardy registered three sacks 
of Indiana quarterbacks in the win. 

And a rejuvenated ground attack saw freshman running back 
Steve Havard burst onto the scene with a handful of impressive 
rushes in his collegiate debut. Havard finished with a team-high 
56 yards on 13 carries. 

"We're very pleased with the quarterbacks we have," Tepper 
said of the alleged quarterback controversy. "They have been 
under tremendous pressure, and it's unfortunate that some of our 
fans are placing the blame on our signal-callers." 




-Daily Illini File Photo 



I Iron man 

{•(obert Holcombe is pulled to the turf by a host of East Carolina defenders. Holconibc carried 
\he ball an lllini-record 49 times and racked up 150 yards in the 7-0 defeat of the Pirates. 
\)uane Lyle had three interceptions, including the game-saver in the Illinois end zone late in 
he game. 



r 



Football 157 



MICHIGAN STATE 27 ILLINOIS 21 



Few gave the Spartans a 
chance considering they 
invaded Memorial Stadium 
without the services of starting 
quarterback and emotional leader 
Tony Banks. But MSU's Scott 
Greene picked up the slack and then 
some, bulling his way for 82 of the 
Spartans' 251 rushing yards. In fact, 
the bruising fullback accounted for 
all but one of MSU's points, rush- 
ing for four touchdowns and a two- 
point conversion to single-handedly 
send Illinois to defeat. Greene's 
partner in the backfield Marc 
Renaud contributed 131 yards as 
the visitors repeatedly exploited 



Illinois' uncharacteristically soft 
middle. 

"They weren't doing anything 
tricky, they were coming right at us 
and at the heart of our defense," 
Rice said. "There's no sugarcoating 
the issue-we're down and our backs 
are to the wall now. I don't think 
guys realized how important a vic- 
tory was today. They got compla- 
cent and forgot how much effort 
that was involved in the previous 
wins. They thought it was just 
going to happen." 

Illinois' only lead of the contest 
came with 6:38 left in the third 
quarter when a 25-yard run by 



Holcombe put them up, 14-13. The 
Spartans responded with two con- 
secutive scoring marches to put the 
game out of reach. Holcombe 
racked up 146 yards on 21 carries, 
but Johnson and Weaver were only 
a combined 13 for 34 and could 
only muster 288 total yards in the 
blustery conditions. 

"Sure, we would love to have 
one guy who is very effective," 
Tepper said of the quarterback 
dilemma. "Right now, we don't 
have that. Yet I would say that the 
defense put a great deal of pressure 
on the offense. They just knocked 
us off the ball." 




1 58 8PO 



I Spartan effo 

Michigan State special tcamcr Marvin Wri}iht tries to corral Ryan Moore as Moo 
turns flic corner on a puiu retnrn. Spcntan fullhack Scott (ireen's four toiiclnhnw 

paced MSL!'s 27-21 upset at Memorial StaJnii 







■% w 



M 



^^^^nJi% 




-Joel Rennich 



NORTHWESTERN 17 ILLINOIS 14 



■ ^he mini welcomed the 
I Wildcats for Homecoming 
-A~ hoping to close the book on 
allege football's most endearing 
inderella story. Instead, the lUini 
iecame the latest chapter in NU's 
nprobable march toward Pasadena 
id a Rose Bowl clash with USC. 
linois used a fortuitous bounce to 
ice to a 14-0 edge on the Cats early 
1 the second quarter. The first 
;ore was set up when a Weaver 
iss bounced off of Jason Dulick 
id fell into the hands of a streaking 
ob Majoy, who took the deflection 
I the Northwestern eight-yard line, 
our plays later. Weaver waltzed 
iito the end zone on a bootleg to put 
le mini up 7-0. Then, pinned at 
leir own three to start the second 



quarter, Illinois moved the remain- 
ing 97 yards in 16 plays, capped by 
Holcombe's seven-yard sweep. 

The mini were still clinging to a 
14-10 lead with 7:00 left in the bat- 
tle for the Sweet Sioux Tomahawk. 
But NU's standout running back, 
Darnell Autry, who would finish 
with 159 yards rushing on the day, 
broke free to the Illinois three-yard 
line, the Cats had four opportunities 
to punch across the winning score. 
Despite inspired goal-line stands on 
the next three plays, Autry took a 
pitch and cut into the end zone. 

"I wanted the ball, obviously," 
Autry said. "There was no way I 
wasn't going to get in. I was 
scratching and clawing as much as I 
could to get in." 



The mini picked themselves off 
the canvas and were poised to pull 
the upset victory out of the fire after 
Weaver lofted a 37-yard bomb to 
Dulick to convert a fourth down. 
From there, Illinois shot itself in the 
foot with sacks and penalties. 
Weaver was forced to heave a Hail 
Mary attempt into the end zone that 
was intercepted by Northwestern to 
end the game. 

"It was a chess game on the side- 
lines as to what Illinois' defense 
was doing and what we had to do to 
solve it," Wildcat coach Gary 
Bamett said. "We didn't quite ever 
get it solved. But let me tell you, 
that was a great, hard-fought foot- 
ball game from a coach's stand- 
point." 



I Right place, right time 

Receiver Rob Majoy takes ojf 
down the sideline past 
Northwestern' s Rodney Ray 
and Pat Fitzgciald after 
catching a hi;^li deflection of a 
Scott Weaver pass. Majoy s 
play set up Illinois' first touch- 
down, hut the Wildcats rallied 
for a 17-14 win on the way to 
a storybook season that ended 
in the Rose Bowl. 



Football 



159 



ypm 



Picking his way 

Freshman tailback Steve 
Havard splits the Iowa 
defense in Illinois' 26-7 win 
at Kinnick Stadium. Despite 
being forced to miss the 
beginning of the season due 
to an NCAA misunderstand- 
ing, Havard turned heads 
with solid peiformances at 
Indiana and Iowa. 




The mini cemented their rep- 
utation as road warriors by 
surprising the Hawkeyes 
with their best overall effort of the 
season. Illinois took its frustrations 
out on its biggest rival and silenced 
a sold-out Kinnick Stadium crowd 
by ripping off 23 unanswered points 
to close out the game. 

Trailing 7-3 and sputtering late in 
the first half, Holcombe sparked the 
mini by busting a 56-yard run up the 
middle before being dragged down 
from behind at the Iowa 28. The 
play turned out to be Illinois" 
longest from scrimmage all season. 
From (here. .Johnson connected with 
tight end Mall Cushing for a score 
and ihc lllini never looked back. A 
bahinccil ami relentless rusiiing 
attack accounted lor a season-higii 
244 yards on the ground as lx)lh 



ILLINOIS 26 IOWA 7 

Douthard and Havard tacked on sec- 
ond-half scores that buried the 
Hawks. 

"They have continued to believe 
in what we're trying to get accom- 
plished here," Tepper said. "It"s a 
boost for them because they have 
continued to work hard. But it was- 
n't easy, though. In the last three 
years, Hayden Fry (Iowa's coach) 
has caused me more trouble and 
sleepless nights than ansone in the 
Big Ten." 

But a suffocating defense was 
once again the stor> of the game. 
Iowa's standi>ut running back. 
Sedrick .Shaw, needed S3 \ards to 
become the school's all-time lead 
ing rusher. Illinois' ilclcnse limiteil 
the cntnv ll.i\\kc\c oltcnsc to 20 
yarils rusiimg. 

Forced to the air. Iowa quarter- 



back Matt Sherman completed 2 
of 42 passes, but five of thos 
completions were to white-jei 
seyed lllini defenders, ironicall 
as many as the lllini recei\ei 
reeled in on the afternoon. Wit 
the Hawks trying to stage a coim 
back. Sherman killed four straigl 
Iowa drives in the second ha 
w ith interceptions. 

"This demonstrates ho^ 
focused this team is once we leav 
Memorial Stadium." safet 
Antwoine Patton said. "It's strictl 
business-iheres no tun. no jokiir 
around, no laughing, ^■ou ju! 
ttviis on loolball. We got pressui 
on their iiuarierback. and he thrc 
some b.ills tlial probabh shouldn 
h.i\c been ihiown. That ga\e us a 
opjioitunitv. and the secondar 
made llie pla\s."" 



OHIO STATE 41 ILLINOIS 3 



The weather was not the only factor 
around Ohio Stadium that took a 
turn for the worse. Buckeye run- 
liny back Eddie George ran through and 
iround a stagnant Illini defense in roUing 
ip 314 yards on 36 attempts in OSU's rout 
)f Illinois. The loss, the worst in nine 
/ears for the Illini, snapped a string of six 
vins against the powerful Bucks in the 
ast seven years. 

"He was a nightmare," Tepper said. "I 



don't believe I've ever had anybody rush 
like that against us in my career. That's 
about as awesome a display as I've ever 
seen. " 

Holding out Ohio State's game-break- 
ing wideout Terry Glenn did not seem to 
restrict quarterback Bobby Hoying and 
the rest of the home team's offensive jug- 
gernaut. The Illini were fortunate to come 
out of the half down only 17-0. And after 
Illinois' only scoring drive resulted in a 



Scheuplein field goal from 42 yards early 
in the third quarter, it appeared that the 
Illini could make a run at Ohio State. But 
one play and 64 yards later, George was in 
the end zone to push the deficit to an 
insurmountable 24-3. 

"No matter what the plan is, if we don't 
wrap up and tackle, whatever plan is made 
is going to be wrong," Washington said. 
"Ohio State just pounds you to death. 
They try to run it down your throat." 




I Too mucffCeorge 

Johnny Johnson is 
flushed from the pocket 
by Ohio State's Jeff 
Wilson. Johnk)n and 
Illinois were Mid in 
check and Biiwkeye 
running hackmddie 
George ran f^ 314 
yards as OSU won big, 
41-3, to end a four- 
game hex at Ohio 
Stadium against the 
visiting Illini. 



Football 161 



ILLINOIS 48 MINNESOTA 14 



Finding themselves in a must- 
win situation, Illinois' 
seniors called a players-only 
meeting earlier in the week to pre- 
pare for Minnesota. Whatever was 
passed along inside closed doors 
certainly worked in the rout of the 
undermanned Gophers, a victory 
that could not have been scripted 
any better. 

With just over 10:00 left in the 
game. Hardy nailed Minnesota 
quarterback Cory Sauter from 
behind. The blindside hit jarred the 
ball loose and bounced into the 
hands of Rice, who rumble 27 yards 
for his only collegiate touchdown, 
an appropriate cap to the game and 
the duo's brilliant career. 



"I've dreamt about that before, " 
Hardy admitted. "But in the dream, 
it's the other way around. Simeon 
causes the fumble and I pick it up 
and get to score. We'll take it, 
though." 

"That just solidifies my career 
here," Rice said. "It was appropriate 
that it came in my last game at 
Memorial Stadium and Kevin 
caused it. Once I saw the green in 
front of me, no one was going to 
stop me. I wasn't about to be 
denied." 

As was the case all afternoon, the 
lUini took advantage of great field 
position to jump to a 17-0 lead. Four 
of their first six drives began in 
Minnesota territory, three of which 



ended in scores. Holcombe had his 
best game as an lUini, running 
through a porous Gopher defense 
for 206 yards and one touchdown. 
Johnny Johnson celebrated his last 
game at Memorial Stadium by 
throwing for 174 yards and two 
touchdowns while running for 
another to put his lUini up 24-7 just 
before halftime. Sauter finished 21- 
34 for 242 yards and two touch- 
downs in a losing effort. 

"I was proud of the whole team 
and the way in which they tried to 
make the seniors' last day here at; 
Zuppke Field a special one," Tepper 
said. "We talked about how they 
would all be in that situation at one . 
time. We'll miss them." 







I Only appropriati 

I he liliihliiilii of Illinois' scason-Sinwon Rice nucs jhisf Minm'S(>iii luckli' Mikt 
(iiovinctti on his way to a 27 -yard touchdown return of a fumble forced hy fellow Al 
American Kevin Ihndx. Illinois' seniors sjunkdl ii 4S-14 roiti of the Gophers in 

last Menwriid Siiidium ((>///< v, 



3M rt fattflMi . iiww B8g ctri^^ 




Fit to be tied 

van Moore cuts out of the grasp of Wisconsin's Dave Anderson as he returns a Badger punt. The Illini could 
9t cash in on their offensive opportunities and settled for a 3-3 tie that took them out of the bowl 
icture in the season finale at Camp Randall Stadium. 

ILLINOIS 3 WISCONSIN 3 



Needing a victory to become bowl 
eligible, the Illini fell just short of 
the six-win minimum. Missed 
ipportunities included Holcombe's fum- 
|le near the goal line that the Badgers 
^covered in the end zone for a touchback. 
md with less than a minute left in the 
ame, Scheuplein also missed a 54-yard 
ick by less than a yard. But both had out- 
tanding games otherwise. Holcombe 
ecame only the sixth running back in 
llinois history to eclipse the century mark 
1 rushing yardage, finishing the season 
l/ith 1,051. Meanwhile, earlier in the 
Ourth quarter, Scheuplein salvaged the tie 



with a 51 -yard boot. 

"i hate to lose, but I'd rather lose than 
tie," Johnson said after the game. "To us, 
there was no tomorrow. We were looking 
to win the game first. We don't look ahead, 
so I don't think we looked for a bowl 
game." 

Wisconsin's John Hall pushed a 29- 
yard field goal attempt wide right in the 
second quarter as both teams seemed fit to 
be tied. Badger quarterback Darrel Bevell 
was knocked out of his final game before 
adoring Camp Randall Stadium fans with 
a bruised kidney, but not before complet- 
ing 19 of 31 passes for 184 yards. 101 of 



those yards were to Bevell 's favorite tar- 
get, wideout Donald Hayes. Carl 
McCullough carried 35 times for 132 
yards, putting him over 1,000 for the sea- 
son as well. Despite their success both on 
the ground and through the air, the 
Badgers couldn't break a bending Illini 
defensive front. But that didn't erase the 
sting of Illinois' late-game execution. 

"To have as many possessions as we 
had in the last four minutes was an oppor- 
tunity lost, but it was definitely an exciting 
game," Tepper said. "It's a silent locker 
room up there, but I am proud of the intensi- 
ty with which we played and hung together." 



Football 



163 



VOLLEYBALL 



I By the iMumoers 



Ul 

3 


Providence 


Opp 




3 


Delaware 





3 


Jacksonville 





3 


Mississippi 





3 


Eastern Illinois 





3 


Georgia Tech 





3 


Texas A&M 


2 


3 


Missouri 





3 


Louisville 


1 


1 


Ohio State 


3 


2 


Penn State 


3 


2 


Purdue 


3 


3 


Northwestern 








Michigan State 


5 


3 


Michigan 





4 


Indiana 


1 


3 


Iowa 





3 


Wisconsin 


1 


3 


Minnesota 





3 


Northwestern 


1 


3 


Purdue 





2 


Michigan 


3 


2 


Michigan State 


3 


2 


Indiana 


3 


3 


Iowa 





3 


Western Illinois 





3 


Eastern Illinois 





3 


Minnesota 


2 


1 


Wisconsin 


3 


3 


Penn State 


2 


3 


Ohio State 


1 


3 




Georgia 
Texas 


1 
3 



24 Wins I 9 Losses 



rivia 



Did yon know.. .since they moved 
lo Huff Gym in 1990, the llliiti 
have ypt to finish out ol the top 

six in NCAA attendance, includ- 

inn titles in 1992 and 199.1 

Illinois has won more than 7S 



SILENCING 
CRITICS 



YOUNG VOLLEYBALL TEAM ERASES QUESTIONS AND 
THEN SOME ON WAY TO SWEET 16 APPEARANCE 

Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Sara Cahill 



Seventh place. That's where 
the Big Ten volleyball 
coaches predicted a relative- 
ly green and unknown Illinois 
squad would end up in their presea- 
son poll. 

For such a proud program with 
unparalleled tradition in the Big 
Ten and the Midwest, this was 
definite bulletin board material. 
Critics pointed to the potentially 
fatal combination of seven new- 
comers and only two returning 
starters for the lUini. 

These facts apparently fell on 
deaf ears because it was coach 
Mike Hebert and his youthful but 
close-knit Illini that enjoyed the 
last laugh. Illinois turned heads on 
the national scene all the way to 
the Sweet Sixteen in the NCAA 
tournament. 

"This year was definitely the 
most fun for me," senior co-cap- 
tain Megan Stettin said. "I'm not 
taking anything away from the 
team that I played with freshman 
year (that won the Big Ten), but 
this team was terrific." 

The Illini opened the season by 
ripping off nine straight wins, the 
second-best start in program his- 
tory. Included in the streak was a 
dramatic five-game rally against 
Texas A&M to win the Mi/uno 
USA Cup in Chicago. 

"Thai characterizes our team." 
freshman hitter Mary Coleman 
said. "From behind, we just tricii 
to stay focused and regather. You 
know wha( they say. defense wins 
championships. We depended a 
lot on our dercnsc." 

I.vcn though il won its scxcnih 
llliiu Classic championship. 
Illinois proved il was the real 



deal, ironically, with two losses in 
one fateful weekend. The Illini 
dropped two nailbiters to Top Ten 
rivals Ohio State and Penn State, 
but gained confidence by taking 
the Big Ten's best to the wire. Ail- 
American Erin Borske registered 
32 kills against the Buckeyes, one 
short of the Illinois record. She 
shattered that 24 hours later, set- 
ting Big Ten records by pounding 
a staggering 44 kills in 92 swings 
against the Lady Lions. 

"We gave a great effort and the 
games could have gone either 
way," Borske, who battled shoul- 
der tendinitis all season, said. 
"But sometimes they just got the 
breaks. We were playing with the 
best of the best and hanging in 
there." 

After a slump, a seven-match 
tear allowed Illinois to claw its 
way back into the conference race 
only to drop three straight five- 
game matches on the road in frus- 
trating fashion. Michigan, 
Michigan State and Indiana all 
claimed the rally game to drop the 
Illini to 17-7 overall. 8-7 in the 
Big Ten. 

The Illini had won only one of 
its six five-game marathons 
against Big Ten opposition before 
enjoying arguably the most suc- 
cessful weekend in Illinois histo- 
ry. In danger of not making the 
4S-team NCAA field and finish^ 
ing in the upper division o\ ihc 
Big Ten tor (ho first time in over a 
decade, the Illini were faced with 
the tougiiest o\' roads-getting a 
u in at Pent) Stale or ()hiii Stale. 
Illinois dill one beltei. i">oci>Miing 
only the sccoiui team mi IiisIoia to 
pull oil the s\M\'|v Ihc w ins 



earned the players the right to dye 
Hebert's hair blue when they 
returned to Champaign. 

"Like a fool, I said, 'Sure, I'll 
do that. That'll be a very small 
price to pay for two victories,'" 
Hebert said at the NCAA pairings 
press conference the next day. 
"Yeah, I feel pretty stupid, but it 
was genuinely worth it." 

The NCAA selection commit- 
tee acknowledged the feat by 
awarding the Illini a No. 3 seed in 
the East regional and a first-round 
bye. Illinois dismantled Georgia 
3-1 in the Huff finale and earned 
a trip to Gainesville. Fla. for the 
regional semifinal against power- 
ful Texas. The Illini were on the 
doorstep of winning each of the 
first two games, but let both slip 
away with late-game errors. 

"I am more proud of this team 
than any other that I've coached 
here at Illinois," Hebert said. 
"This has been the most competi- 
tive group of players I've ever 
coached at Illinois, bar none, in 
terms of taking on an opponent, 
hanging in there and not \\on\ing 
about being behind. Those are 
qualities that you just don't find 
e\ery year in a team." 
E\en more painful than the sea- 
son-ending setback to Texas was 
Hebert's stunning announcement 
in lale December that he was 
lca\ ing to lake over the 
Minnesota program after a leg- 
oiular\ 1 3-> ear career. .Mlcr 
bringing the Illinois program from 
campus ob.scurity to national 
limeligin. Illinois' dynamic leader 
was saving goodinc I'ornicr 
Illinois assislaiil Hon ll.iidm was 
n. lined his successor in January. 



ji i iJyiiitti BaftaBai^^ 




Daily mini File Photo 




I Back at you 

As she rises above the net, middle blocker 
Megan Stettin roofs an Indiana hitter in a 
televised home win. Illinois' lone senior and 
a co-captain, a healthy Stettin blossomed into 
the Big Ten 's second-ranked hitter 

I Rearing back 

Focusing on Carolien Dikhojf's set, middle 
Kelly Scherr prepares to slam the ball 
through the Eastern Illinois defense. 
Scherr 's smooth transition from the outside 
was a major reason Illinois surpassed 
preseason expectations. 



-Lance Johnson 



Women's Volleyball 



165 






mm 

1 



:■•-•:?■' 



■'*m---. 



I Focusing in 

With his eyes on a Ken 
Kiihrt set, senior outside 
hitter Andy Nedzel 
prepares to hammer the 
ball through the Northern 
Illinois defense. Nedzel, 
who was named MVP of 
the Wolverine Classic, co- 
captained this year's club. 



P^F 



I ( 



> I 



I Getting up 

Avoiding the wall of 

Northern Illinois blockers, 

hitter Terry Fallen rises 

for a kill in a home victory 

at Kenney Gym. Fallen, a 

four-year, first-team 

performer, was also a 

co-captain and club 

president for Illinois this 

season . 



166 




RTS 







WALKING 
THE WALK 



MEN'S VOLLEYBALL CLUB RELIES ON CONFIDENT 
ATTITUDE, TEAMWORK FOR SUCCESSFUL CAMPAIGN 

Story by E m i I i o Cervantes • Layout by A m a ra Rozgus 



In a year when Illinois sports 
fans had little to cheer about 
with the revenue teams, the 
Illinois men's volleyball club gave 
Illinois fans both a confident and 
experienced team that did not bow 
down to many of its opponents. 

With five starters returning from 
a team that finished fifth in the Big 
Ten a year ago, Illinois set its goals 
very high at the start of the season. 
One of the main goals of the 1995- 
96 season was for Illinois to win the 
! Big Ten conference championship, 
which would mark the team's sec- 
ond title in three years. 

Illinois did what few other teams 
on campus could do this year, and 
that was to win on a consistent 
basis. One of the main reasons for 
this was the steady and balanced 
play of the whole team, a quality 
that was key for Illinois' success 
this season. Outside hitters Terry 
Fallen and Lawrence Lee, setter 
Ken Kuhrt and middle Andy Nedzel 
meshed together to form a formida- 
ble starting lineup. 

Coach Claudio Paiva made no 
bones about it-Illinois did not have 
any star players. Paiva said, "Our 
team depends heavily on the con- 
cept of team play." 

The club began the year on the 
right foot by posting a 16-2 record 
in the fall, including triumphs at the 
Illinois State Tournament and the 
elite "Back to the Hardwood" 



Classic hosted by Big Ten rival 
Michigan State. 

Illinois continued its winning 
ways into the spring, pushing its 
overall mark to 25-3 by disposing 
of Wisconsin and Purdue before 
claiming the 54-team Indiana 
Invitational with seven straight vic- 
tories. The club cruised to the title, 
dropping only a single game en 
route to the championship. 

Illinois then ripped off eight 
more wins in a row at the Wolverine 
Classic in Ann Arbor. The club beat 
out 28 other teams in the field for 
the top prize. 

The club then improved its 
record to 34-3 with easy wins over 
Northwestern and Northern Illinois. 

Illinois then travelled to 
Lexington for the Kentucky North- 
South Tournament hosted by the 
Wildcats. The club returned with a 
second-place trophy in tow. 

After breezing through its five- 
team pool to earn in a berth in the 
quarterfinals, Illinois disposed of 
Georgia and Wisconsin to set up a 
title match against highly-ranked 
Florida. 

Illinois ran out to a 14-11 advan- 
tage in the first game and 11-6 in 
the second, but the Gators rallied in 
both instances to claim the champi- 
onship. Illinois placed Nedzel and 
Lee on the all-tournament roster. 

At presstime, Illinois had posted 
a sparkling record of 40-4 heading 



into the last stretch of regular sea- 
son play. 

Illinois' confidence was also a 
clear positive for the team. Going 
into most matches fearless of a neg- 
ative outcome, the Illinois spikers 
became the team all others in the 
Big Ten were shooting for. 

"If we can play as good as we 
can, then I think there is no team in 
the Big Ten that can beat us," 
Illinois hitter Nedzel said. 

Although some matches this sea- 
son were merely walks in the park 
for the Illinois volleyball team, the 
club did not fear overconfidence or 
letdowns. 

"If we're playing against a team 
that we know is going to give us a 
good match, then we're going to 
raise our level of play a whole 
notch," Nedzel said. 

Illinois' winning ways this season 
were not only limited to dominating 
the Big Ten. As for the bigger picture, 
several Illinois players had more than 
just the Big Ten title in mind. 

"This is the best team that we've 
had at the university in my four 
years here," Fallen said. 

"I'd like to see us go to the Final 
Four, if not win the whole thing," 
Nedzel said, going one step further. 

Evidently, the 1995-96 Illinois 
volleyball club was one team that 
expected to win and did not let 
themselves or the Illinois fans 
down. 

Men! 




1 By the Numbers 1 1 


Ul Opp 1 


1st Illinois St. Tourney 




1st Michigan St. Tourney 




2 Loyola 


1 


Chicago USVBA 


2 


2 Teikyo Marycrest 





Michigan State 


3 


3 Wisconsin 


1 


3 Purdue 





1st Indiana Invitational 




1st Wolverine Classic 




3 Northwestern 





3 Northern Illinois 


1 


2nd Kentucky Tourney 




40 Wins 1 4 Losses 1 



nvia 



Did you know. ..the men's 
volleyball club won its first Big 

Ten championship in 1994. 
Behind conference MVP Eric 

Kirstein, Illinois defeated 
Michigan in the title match. 



'S VOLLEYBALL 167 



^'MMf^ 



NIKE 
PRESENCE 



CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP BECOMING A WIN-WIN 

RELATIONSHIP 



Story by Ben Hoyle • Layout by Jill Kogon 



The crowds were stunned by 
the announcement of the 
Fighting Illini's new play- 
ers: Nike, Pepsi, Ameritech, etc. 
During the summer, the athletic 
department had recruited these very 
lucrative new players and finally 
they were being revealed. Their 
images were plastered under the 
scoreboard, on the back of the tick- 
ets and on the cups that the conces- 
sion stand drinks were sold in. 
These new team members were not 
ordinary players though they were 
corporate partners. 

This was no big change from 
before. Teams have always had busi- 
nesses who donated money or equip- 
ment to them, and the teams have 
always made it known which busi- 
nesses chose to sponsor them. 
However, the name corporate part- 
ners, conjured up images like the 
Fighting Swooshes, the Fighting Pop 
Cans or maybe the Fighting Phone 



Bills. The university has had enough 
problems with its school symbolism 
it surely did not need any more. 

After the initial shock of the new 
set up for team sponsorship, almost 
everybody accepted this arrange- 
ment as a sound economical deci- 
sion for everyone involved. 

Eric Hammill, freshman in 
Engineering, said, "This is 
America, and that is what we do. 
We capitalize on good opportuni- 
ties, and this is a good one for both 
sides." 

With the added financial support 
of a large business, the athletic 
department was able to increase the 
opportunities for its athletes. 

Still, some students were 
ambivalent about the new situation 
and they could find no fault with it. 

"If it works for the greater good 
of the athletic department, then I 
don't think there's anything to com- 
plain about," said Kerry O'Connor, 



sophomore in Engineering. 

O'Connor's opinion was shared 
by a large portion of the student 
body. As long as the students were 
not asked to pay for anything, they 
did not get too interested in the new 
Corporate Partners. 

The overall feeling on campus 
was a positive one for the coiporate 
partners program. With the 
increased revenues from these part- 
ners, the teams were supplied with 
top-notch equipment. However, at 
the same time that students had 
optimism, they also had a little bit 
of concern that this new partnership 
would be handled correctly. 

"I don't see anything wrong 
with the university using advertis- 
er's money to give the athletes a 
better opportunity, but I'd be pretty 
upset if the athletic teams turned 
into a showcase for advertisers," 
said Rich Schram, sophomore in 
LAS. 



Sports 




I Scoreboard 

The Memorial Stadium 
scoreboard displays the Nike 
Swoosh symbol. The athletic 
department recruited other 
corporate sponsorships such 
as Ameritech and Pepsi. 



Nike Swo< 



169 



tiae oy sii 

Pacing each other, fellow juniors 

Robert Winfield and Joe Alexander 

distance themselves from the pack 

at a home race. Winfield received 

the squad's most improved runner 

award at season 's end. 



I 







•""^6: 



mm. 




1^ 










-Lance Johnson 



-Lance Johnson 



I Making the cut 

As he turns the corner, 

senior Eric Henson heads 

for the finish line in a home 

invite at Illinois' golf course 

in Savoy. The team 's MVP 

as a junior Henson also 

excelled in the classroom, 

earning Academic 

Ail-American honors . 

I Making strides 

Bearing down on two Iowa 

runners, sophomore Pat 

Marshall plots how to 

overtake his Hawkeye 

opponents. Illinois was 

stunned by underdog Iowa 

as the visitors w<m by four 

points. 



»RTS 




FALLING 
SHORT 



HARRIERS END HOPEFUL CAMPAIGN ON 
DISAPPOINTING NOTE AT NCAA DISTRICT MEET 

Story by Michael Grubb • Layout by Jill Kogan 



The Illinois men's cross 
country team turned in 
another fine season in 1995, 
but for the second year in a row fell 
just short of its goal of making it to 
the NCAA Championships. 

"This season was definitely 
below our expectations." Illinois 
head coach Gary Wieneke said. 
"But we did have some growth as a 
team. Our major problem was get- 
ting our five best runners to run 
their best races at the same time. 

"Our major goal was to go to 
nationals. We have been on the bub- 
ble for two years in a row now." 

Illinois began its season by win- 
ning all 17 dual meets at the 
Bradley Open in Peoria. The harri- 
ers were paced by super sophomore 
Jason Zieren, who notched fifth 
place. It was a total team effort for 
Illinois, which put five runners in 
the top 20 finishers at the meet. 

The win propelled Illinois to an 
18th-place ranking in the nation and 
gave them the chance to establish 
themselves as one of the top teams 
in the country. 

Later came a heartbreaking loss 
to underdog Iowa at the Illinois 
Invitational in Savoy. The 
Hawkeyes came to town and practi- 
cally stole the victory away. Zieren 
continued his outstanding season by 
placing third with a time of 24:41. 
Koers finished the race seconds 



behind Zieren in fourth. Junior 
Mike Smadris came through in the 
1 OK race with a time of 32: 1 3, good 
for seventh. The harriers had five 
runners place in the top 20 of the 
meet, but that somehow was not 
enough to knock off a charmed 
Iowa squad as Illinois fell to the 
Hawkeyes by a mere four points. 

Illinois prepared to face off 
against its regular conference foes 
in the Big Ten Championships in 
Minneapolis. 

Not surprisingly, the Illini were 
led by the one-two punch of Zieren 
and Koers. Koers came in ninth 
overall, two spots in front of Zieren, 
with a time of 25:14.2. That ended 
Zieren's four-race streak as the top 
Illini finisher. 

"I felt I did a better job of spread- 
ing out my energy," Koers said. "I 
was very pleased with being in the 
top 10 of the Big Ten Conference." 

As a team, the harriers finished 
fourth in the meet. Despite this 
respectable finish, most of the harri- 
ers were not pleased with their per- 
formances. 

"We gave up too many points 
between second and third place." 
Zieren said. "We can't have two 
guys finish ninth and 1 1th. and then 
have our next three runners come in 
the 30s. Our main strength is our 
close team spread." 

The season came to an premature 



end for the harriers at the NCAA 
District IV Cross Country 
Championships in West Lafayette, 
Ind. Illinois could muster only a 
fifth-place team finish, which was 
not good enough to advance to the 
NCAA Championships. Only the 
top three teams in the meet move 
on. 

Illinois was not completely shut 
out as Marco Koers ran a brilliant 
race that helped him finish seventh 
with a time of 3 1 :27. That great per- 
formance qualified the native of the 
Netherlands to move on to the 
NCAA Championship race as an 
individual. 

"I was really pleased to be sev- 
enth overall," Koers said. "That 
exceeded even my own expecta- 
tions." 

Koers was the first Illini to com- 
pete at the NCAA finals since Len 
Sitko accomplished the feat in 
1990. He finished the lOK race 
116th out of the nation's 177 best 
runners with a time of 33:09. 

For his efforts, Koers was named 
as the team's most valuable runner, 
as well as Academic All-Big Ten 
and All-District. Also named 
Academic All-Big Ten were Zieren 
and senior Eric Henson. Other 
awards went to Robert Winfield, 
named the squad's most improved, 
and to freshman Courtney Lamb, 
who was awarded best newcomer. 




1 By the Numbers 1 1 


Ul 


Opp 


1st 


Bradley Open 


2nd 


Illinois Tri-Meet 


2nd 


Illinois X-Country Inv. 


9th 


Iowa St. Memorial Classic 


4th 


Big Ten X-Country Champ. 


5th 


NCAA District IV Champ. 


Season Schedule 1 



nvia 

Did you know.. .from 1973 to 

1976, Illinois legend Craig Virgin\ 

captured all four Big Ten titles 

and added the 1975 NCAA 

Championship to his resume 

before becoming an Olympian 

and world champion in cross 

country. 



Men's Cr 




X-COUNTRY 



1 By the Numbers 1 


Ul 


Opp 


2nd 


Purdue Invitational 


3rd 


Illinois Invitational 


16th 


Nike Invitational 


4th 


Chili Pepper Festival 


10th 


Big Ten Championship 


17th 


NCAA Dsitrict IV 


Season Schedule 



rivta 



Did you know...the banner sea- 
son for women's cross country 
\came in 19H4, when the lllini fin- 
ished second to Wisconsin at the 

Big Ten meet. Led by All- 

Americun Kelly McNee, Illinois 

\ placed four runners in the top 17 

for its best shuwitisever. 



Sports 



LOOKING 
AHEAD 

CROSS COUNTRY SQUAD HOPES TO ADD DEPTH 
NEEDED TO CLIMB BIG TEN LADDER 

Story by Michael Grubb • Layout by Jill Kogan 



Overall, it was a rather 
tough season for this 
year's edition of the 
Illinois women's cross country 
team. When looking back on the 
1995 campaign, it is difficult to find 
a lot of bright spots. Thanks in large 
part to injuries and inexperience, 
the lady harriers struggled to climb 
out of the bottom half throughout 
most of their meets. Illinois had 
only a 12-20 record in its regular 
season dual meets. 

However as the season pro- 
gressed, the lady harriers showed 
steady improvement, culminating 
in a fourth-place finish in the Chili 
Pepper Festival at the University of 
Arkansas. But Illinois could not 
keep its momentum going when it 
ran into Top Ten teams like 
Michigan, Wisconsin and Penn 
State at the Big Ten Conference 
Championships. The lady harriers 
only finished ahead of Ohio State. 

The lady harriers wrapped up 
their season in West Lafayette, Ind., 
at the NCAA District IV 
Championships. Illinois made a 
very respectable showing by placing 
1 7th out of a field of 3 ! teams. 

One silver lining in an otherwise 
cloudy .season was .senior runner 
Becky Garrett. Garrett was easily 



the lady harriers' most consistent 
runner all season. She finished as 
the top lllini three times and came 
in second among her teammates in 
the other three meets this season. 
The three-time letter winner also 
scored a team-best individual time 
of 17:46 at the Chili Pepper 
Festival. Garrett also finished an 
impressive 21st overall against the 
best the Big Ten had to offer at the 
conference championships. 

Also pitching in with a solid sea- 
son was sophomore Jenny Marine. 
Marine started off the season with a 
bang by finishing as Illinois' top 
runner in the first two meets of the 
season. She came in third overall in 
Illinois' season opener at the Purdue 
Invitational with a time of 18:42. 
Marine followed that stellar perfor- 
mance up with an 1 1th place overall 
finish at the Illinois Invitational. 
Like her counterpart Garrett, Marine 
finished as the top lllini runner three 
times, and in the other meets she fin- 
ished second. With another full sea- 
son under her belt. Marine looks to 
be even better next year. 

"I didn't have a good freshman 
year, but 1 felt stronger and more 
consistent this year," Marine said. 
"1 don't think I'm quite where I 
want to be, but I am improving." 



The team's letter winners includ- 
ed Garrett and Renae Paul. Both are 
three-time letter winners in their 
collegiate careers. Marine and 
Katherine Kraiss claimed their sec- 
ond letters, while Brooke 
Scigousky and Lorena Villagrana 
won letters for the first time. 

For their efforts, both Garrett 
and Marine were deservedly named 
the squad's most valuable runners. 

"Garrett and Marine are the co- 
captains and were our leaders 
throughout the season," Illinois 
head coach Gary Winckler said. 
"They provided that leadership that 
we needed as a team every day. 
They were the most consistent run- 
ners we had all season." i 

Scigousky had the honor of' 
being named by her teammates as > 
the squad's most improved runner. 
The junior from Naperville finished 
in the top 25 overall in meets twice ■ 
this season. 

If the lady harriers hope to 
improve in 1996, they need to find 
five consistently productive runners - 
that any team has to have in order to 
compete with nationally ranked 
teams. 

"What we do need is a fourth! 
and fifth runner to step up and close i 
the gap," Winckler said. 





I All alone 

In a home race this fall, 
sophomore Katheruie Kraiss 
paces herself as she heads 
for home. Like most of the 
team 's runners, Kraiss also 
doubled as a distance runner 
for the track team that 

finished fourth in the nation 
last spring. 



-Sports Information 

I Hearing footsteps 

With an opponent right behind her, 

sophomore standout Jenny Marine kicks into a higher gear in a home race 
this fall. Marine, along with senior Becky Garrett, won three races and fin- 
ished second to the other and was awarded co-MVP honors. 



Women's Cross Country 



173 





''.•■:•'"-•-•"■• 


■' . -■ ■■''• 




I Breaking away 

Distancing herself from her 

St. Louis opponent, senior 

midfielder Paula Minor 

dribbles the ball upfield. For 

the third straight year, 

Minor increased her scoring 

totals, ending this year as 

the second-leading scorer 

with 15 goals and eight 

assists. 

I Cutting the comer 

At a home match at the 

Complex Fields, junior 

forward Jeanine Winistorfer 

advances the ball. 

Winistorfer in her first year 

at Illinois, emerged as a 

reliable offensive weapon. 




oi'l Renoich 



1 74 SPORTS 



CLIMBING 
CLOSER 



ILLINOIS SOCCER CONTINUES WINNING WAYS ALL THE 
WAY TO ANOTHER PAIR OF NATIONAL APPEARANCES 

Story by Ismail Turay, Jr. • Layout by Sara Cahill 



FfcDr the past several years, the 
Illinois men and women's soc- 
cer teams have been a domi- 
nant force in their conferences. Each 
year they make a trip to the national 
tournament before being turned away 
empty-handed each time. 

This past season the ladies post- 
ed a 16-5-6 record after opening 
the season with one win and five 
consecutive ties. 

"I think this was probably our 
best season overall," senior Darcy 
Burger said. "We had nine seniors, 
so we had a lot of experience and 
the new people who came in were 
very good and fit in well with the 
team." 

The women also broke a few 
records both individually and as a 
;team. They scored a total of 83 
goals-the most since the team 
formed-and allowed only 19. 
individual records were set by 
'senior forward Fenna Bonsignore, 
jwho had 14 assists. For the second 
iconsecutive season, sophomore for- 
iward Pam Lachcik was the scoring 
Header with 18 goals and 13 assists. 
1 Freshman midfielder Sarah 
Mitchell quickly adjusted early in 
the season and became a starter. 
She was one of four freshmen who 
made the trip with the team to 
[Austin, Texas, for the nationals. 
Another standout on the team was 
sophomore goalie Erica Loechl, 
who played in every game during 
':he season and received All- 



Tournament honors at nationals. 

At nationals, Illinois blew out 
its first victim, Miami (Fla.) 6-1, 
and defeated Ohio University in a 
close match, 1-0. In its third game, 
Illinois tied with Baylor, but ended 
up losing the game because of a 
penalty kick. Finally, Illinois' sea- 
son came to an end when it faced 
Miami of Ohio. The club lost again 
because of a penalty kick follow- 
ing a 2-2 tie in overtime. 

"We played (Miami of Ohio) 
earlier in the season and lost 4-0, 
so we played them much, much 
better that time," Burger stated. 
"And a lot of us probably had our 
best game ever." 

This marked the fifth consecu- 
tive year that the third-ranked 
Illinois women's soccer club quali- 
fied for the nationals, made the 
final four and lost in the semifinals. 

"At least we are consistent if 
not perfect," head coach Scott 
Wilson said. "But I think we actu- 
ally played better at nationals this 
year than we ever had." 

"Of all the teams I've played on, 
this is my favorite," Oberle said. 
"We played well, we worked really 
hard and it was pretty enjoyable." 

The university has agreed to 
add women's soccer to its list of 
varsity teams by 1997. 

With a record of 16-3-3 this 
past season, one might think that 
the same players and coaches on 
the women's soccer team played 



on the Illinois men's team since 
both their records are somewhat 
identical. There were no records 
broken or set during 1995, but it 
was one of the team's best seasons, 
especially since they had a lot of 
new players. 

"That was a great season for 
us," senior Patrick Martin said. 
"We had a lot of young guys to 
start off with, so we weren't sure at 
the beginning of the season how it 
was going to end up." 

Freshman starters Paul 
Ruscheinski, Doug Layne and 
Ryan Paveza all stood out. 
Ruscheinski was one of the top 
scorers during the season. Senior 
Bora Esenler was the Michael 
Jordan of the team. They turned to 
him for that last second miracle 
shot and he always delivered. 

"Esenler plays the game very 
skillfully and he's very technical 
with his game," junior Craig 
Wunderleich said. 

For the ninth consecutive year 
since its inaugural season in 1 986 
and its only national championship 
that season, the men's soccer team 
qualified for nationals in 1995 and 
placed third for the first time since 
1992. 

"Every year we have always 
had a pretty good team, so I think 
we always expect to go to nation- 
als, but I don't know if we were 
expecting to finish as high as we 
did," Martin said. 




SOCCER 



1 By the Numbers 1 


Ul 


Opp 




Men's postseason 


2 


Indiana 


4 


Purdue 3 


1 


Michigan 1 


1 


Texas A&M 2 


1 


Tennessee 1 


6 


ND State 


4 


Mankato State 2 


1 


Brigham Young 2 




Women's postseason 


7 


Western Illinois 


7 


Illinois State 


2 


Iowa 3 


6 


Miami (Fla.) 1 


1 


Ohio 


2 


Baylor 2 


2 


Tulane 1 


2 


Miami (Ohio) 2 


16 Wins 1 3 Losses 



rivia 



Did you know. ..both the men's 

and women 's soccer squads 

advanced to nationals for the 

fifth consecutive year. The 

Urbana-Champaign Senate 

rewarded the women by giving 

them varsity status, making them \ 

eligiNe for Big Ten play in 1997. 




BRITISH 
TRADITION 



RUGBY'S POPULARITY GROWING AS ILLINOIS CLUB 
POSTS WINNING CAMPAIGN 

Story by Tim Shea • Layout by Lisa Wliitenacl< 



In 1 832, during a drizzling after- 
noon football (soccer) match at 
the Rugby School in the 
English Midlands, William Web- 
Ellis picked up the ball, ran down 
field and placed it gingerly upon the 
muddy grass. Before a startled audi- 
ence, the sport rugby union was 
born. 

Since early days, rugby culture 
was established as an upper-class 
sport for wealthy, university-bound 
boys. It now has wide appeal in 
Europe and select southern hemi- 
sphere nations, of course taking a 
modest rank beneath football (soccer). 

America has taken to rugby. As it 
was developed and nurtured as a 
true British "gentleman's" pursuit, 
American rugby is slowly evolving 
into a unique version of that stan- 
dard. 

The international reputation the 
U of 1 holds as a research institution 
drew many students from Great 
Britain. Arriving here to find a dis- 
turbing lack of rugby activity, these 
inspired lads founded the 
University of Illinois' Men's Rugby 
Club. The Club will start its 65th 
.season in 1996. 

Last season, the Club, earning a 
7-5-1 record, did well relative to its 



Midwestern peers. Much like the 
Oxford-Cambridge rivalry, at an 
away match against Northwestern 
University, with 28-degree condi- 
tions, sleet and a stiff Chicago wind 
blowing across the lakefront pitch, 
the Illinois side came up with a bril- 
liant performance. As a highlight, 
the team also received one of 16 
invitations to the Midwest 
Collegiate Cup. 

Coach Ben Montez had his rook- 
ie year as a player at Illinois in 1977. 
"Invitation to the Cup tourna- 
ment was quite an honor," Montez 
said. "Our side did quite well, even 
though membership isn't really 
where I would like it to be. I'm 
happy to have coached these guys 
this season. We welcome anyone 
who is willing to have a go at the 
sport." 

Corey Cullinan, senior in LAS 
and president of the Club, felt that 
there are several aspects to the 
game that many people do not 
understand. 

"The most common misconcep- 
tion is that union has no rules," 
Cullinan said. "The reality is that 
the game is extremely technical. 
Another assumption is that the 
game is for savage beasts. The real- 



ity is that the original culture of the 
gentleman's game remains. We play 
hard for victory, and in defeat we 
keep our heads high and shake the 
opponent's hand." 

Ed Kaspar, a senior in LAS, said, 
"The sport will catch on big if, by 
some long shot, it becomes avails 
able at the high school level. I don't 
think Americans will forget their 
football because of a sport less pop-i 
ular than soccer." 

Junior in FAA Seth Davidow 
said, "Many at the U of I may noi 
understand that if you want to play 
rugby, but have never played 
before, you can come along to train 
ing any time. There is room on tho 
team for anyone who is willing to 
try. I never played before, and nov* 
I've learned enough skill to play a, 
scrum-half," said Davidow. 

Whether or not rugby becomei 
popular in America, the extensioi 
of the British tradition will contim 
ue. U of I players this season hav« 
proven that the skill and commit 
ment needed to play the old boy' 
game is here in the Club members 
And perhaps more importantly, thii 
Club is the kind that would, a 
Cullinan said, shake the opponent' 
hand. 



?s?s;i: 



s:..vs 





I The need for speed 

The Illinois rugby club 
works fast to wrestle for 
control of the ball. Last sea- 
son, the club, earning a 7-5- 
1 record, did well relative to 
its Midwestern peers. 

I Holding on 

A rather rough sport, rugby 
requires skill and determina- 
tion. The game originated in 
Great Britain and has 
gained popularity^ in the 
United States. 



-Ryan Donovan 



Men's Rut 



177 



mkt 



k}^. 




^AGROSSE 



1 By the Numbers 1 


Ul 


Opp 


12 


Purdue 


7 


8 


West Virginia 


4 


11 


East Strousberg 





8 


Maryland 


9 


11 


Johns Hopkins 


2 


14 


Bowling Green 


6 


12 


Great Lakes 


4 


5 


Purdue 


4 


11 


Lincoln Park 


7 


7 


Pittsburgh 


5 


5 


West Virginia 


3 


9 


Buffalo 


3 


5 


West Virginia 


3 


14 


Kellog Men's Club 


7 


14 


Northwestern 


8 


12 


Alumni 


3 


12 


Baylor 


4 


5 


Austin Men's Club 


13 


1 Southern Methodist 





4 


Texas 


6 


7 


Texas Tech 


6 


18 Wins 1 3 Losses 



Did you know,. .Illinois' lacrosse 
dub is the only Big Ten repre- 
sentative in the National 
Collegiate LacroKse league. The 
prestigious 80-leam association 

grants membership to top 
lacrosse clubs from across the 




GAINING 
RESPECT 



LAXMEN POST EXCELLENT FALL RECORD THAT HAS 
THEM THINKING BIG TEN TITLE IN THE SPRING 

Story by Andrew Sachs • Layout by Steve Li ao 



Two tournament victories 
and an 18-3 record in the 
fall have the Illinois 
lacrosse team thinking Big Ten 
championship and possibly more. 

The team, coached by Brian 
Mosher, featured a high-powered 
offensive attack and a solid defense, 
combining for one of the most well- 
rounded teams Illinois has ever put 
on the field. 

"It's rare to see this much talent 
on one team," Mosher said. 
"However, it's our conditioning and 
hard work that's been winning ball 
games and setting us apart." 

After an early-season loss to 
Maryland, the team reeled off 
twelve victories in a row to run its 
record to 15-1 before two devastat- 
ing injuries ruined the team's 
chances at yet another tournament 
victory. The injuries were to starting 
midfielders Dave Neff and Rick 
Himsel. While playing a tourna- 
ment in Texas that Mosher called an 
end-of-the-season reward for the 
players, Neff and Himsel both came 
home with broken collarbones. 

"To have two of the same 
injuries one after another is really a 
freak thing," Mosher said. "It defi- 
nitely effected our play the rest of 
the tournament." 

Illinois came home with a .3-2 
record in the tournament and a 
sixth-place finish in a field of 32. 
Nothing to be ashamed of, for sure. 



but not nearly the level of success 
enjoyed by a healthy Illinois 
lacrosse team earlier in the season. 

After opening the season with a 
4-1 record, the team travelled to 
Ohio for the Dayton Wingvitational. 
The tournament featured a strong 
gathering of 16 teams from around 
the Midwest. Illinois came into the 
tournament as the defending cham- 
pions and left with its second cham- 
pionship trophy. 

The fmal game of the tournament 
was a rematch of last year's champi- 
onship game against Chicago's 
Lincoln Park team. Himsel's five 
goals sparked the offense and helped 
the team pull away from a 3-3 tie at 
the half, winning 1 1-7. 

The following weekend, October 
15th and 16th, Illinois travelled to 
West Virginia for the Mountaineer 
Invitational. In running its record to 
12-1, the team faced some tough 
competition. The tournament slate 
included the National Collegiate 
Lacrosse League's (NCLL) top fin- 
isher from two years ago and run- 
ner-up from last year. 

The quarterfinal game pitted the 
club against the host Mountaineers, 
who eliminated Illinois in the 1995 
NCLL tournament en route to their 
second-place finish. West Virginia 
lost to Illinois for the second time in 
as many tries this fall, this time by a 
7-5 score. Illinois met West Virginia 
once again, this lime for the cham- 



pionship. 

The Mountaineers looked as 
though they might avenge their two 
earlier losses to Illinois, taking a 3- 
2 lead into the final two minutes of) 
the game. Down, but not out,l 
Illinois found a way to win.) 
Midfielder Paul Parasugo scored the 
tying goal, giving him a hat trick for 
the contest. Himsel scored the final 
two goals to close out the victory 
for Illinois. 

Riding a nine-game winning 
streak, Illinois took on 
Northwestern and Kellog's men's 
club, a team of NU's MBA students, 
in Chicago. Illinois easily defeated 
both, with attack man Mike Maeder 
pulling off a double hat trick with 
six goals in a 14-7 rout over Kellog. 
And against Northwestern, senior 
attack captain John McKinley had a 
career game with eight goals in a 
14-8 laugher. 

The fall success has Illinois hun- 
gry for more. A unanimous goal 
among the team members is to win 
the Big Ten championship in the 
spring. To do so, Illinois will have 
to end the seven-year reign of cui 
rent champion Michigan. 

"We're probably the runner-up 
favorites to win this year," Neff 
said. "Wisconsin may be belter 
than us because thc\ have more 
experience. This is the first \oai 
that Michigan won't be ihc 
favorite." 




■Courtesy Daily lllini 




I Looking to pass 

With a defender converging on 
him, defenseman Andy Perella pre- 
pares to pass the ball to fellow 
defensemen Dave Dorsay in a 
home match at the Complex 
Fields. Illinois' defense keyed a 
successful fall season that saw the 
cluh post an 18-3 record. 

I Ahead of the pack 

Moving without the hall, midfield- 
er Paul Pauasugo weaves his way 
through traffic. Parasugo scored a 
critical hat trick in a comeback 
victory against West Virginia this 
fall. 



Courtesy Daily I 



Lacrosse 



179 



OJ 



m^ 





j^ 



'st 



^ 



i Born leaders 

The mini cheerleaders 

lead the crowd at the 

Homecoming game. Their 

training is necessary for 

endurance. 




I Perfect form 

The Illinettes perform a cheer on the 

sidelines to pump up the crowd. Most 

of the members have had previous 

performance experience . 

I Strength and balance 

Two mini cheerleaders perform a 

dangerous-looking stunt. These arc 

usually crowd favorites. 




180 



Sports 



SIDELINE 
SPORTS 



I 



■LUNETTES, CHEERLEADERS SEE BEHIND-THE-SCENES 

WORK PAY OFF 

Story by S h eowt i n g Lu • Layout by Stacie S u n d e m 



Although they are sometimes 
overshadowed by the 
events of the game, the 
lUini cheerleading team and the 
Illinettes generate excitement among 
the crowd as they execute crisp 
movements in their routines. During 
the game, both teams perfomi along 
the sidelines in an effort to rally the 
fans. They dazzle the crowds with 
innovative moves and perform 
impressive stunts. 

From the stands, they seem to 
carry out the routines effortlessly, but 
in reality, they have put in as much 
hard work and dedication as any 
other team. Self-motivation and 
practice have been the key to the 
success of both teams. 

According to Illini cheerleading 
co-captain Christian Bryant, senior 
in LAS, preparation before home 
games includes practice four times a 
week and weightlifting three times a 
week to build endurance. 

"We work and train as a team. We 



also have to overcome problems 
together Everyone gives input into 
making the team work," said Bryant. 
"Another factor is motivation. 
Motivation really makes the team. 
We have to be internally motivated 
all the time. Our job is to work the 
crowds. That's where the hard stuff 
comes into play." 

Dedication is another element 
making Illini cheerleading a good 
team. 

"In order to do your job well, you 
have to have dedication to the sport 
and really want to do it," said Bryant. 

Performing the same sideline 
cheers as the cheerleaders while 
leaving out the stunts, the Illinettes 
pride themselves on their sportsman- 
ship and performance style. 

"Most of us have danced or done 
something on the performance level 
in the past," said co-captain Andrea 
Koenig, senior in LAS. "We all 
enjoy performing for a crowd and 
being a part of the Big Ten." 



This year, more than half of the 
28-member team is made up of new 
members. According to co-captain 
Stacy OIkiewicz, senior in CBA. the 
new girls add excitement to the team. 

"They're really focused, dedicat- 
ed and willing to put in the extra time 
and effort to get something right," 
said OIkiewicz. 

Central to the success of the 
Illinettes is the confidence of the 
dancers before each peifomiance. 

"Being an Illinette lets you really 
take part in the outcome of the game. 
We do our best to entertain the 
crowds," said Koenig. 

Although members of both 
teams take their work seriously, 
they also enjoy themselves during 
the games. 

"It's really great performing in 
front of the crowds," said Bryant. 
"We really pride ourselves in the 
style of cheerleading. The most 
exciting thing is being part of the 
tradition." 




I Extreme class 

The Illinettes perform a rou- 
tine during halftime. They 
pride themselves on their 
performance style. 



I 



Si 






By the Numbers 


\, ■■ 


Ul 


Opp 


■"^ 


83 


Texas-San Antonio 


80 




89 


Eastern Illinois 


57 




75 


Duke 


65 




82 


Kansas State 


56 


K| 89 


SE Missouri State 


70 


1 97 


Ball State 


53 


Hsi 


Illinois-Chicago 


73 


H 96 


Missouri 


85 


W 83 


California 


69 


■j 64 


Syracuse 


75 


B| 82 


Hawaii 


81 


' 


85 


NC State 


76 


^ 64 


Minnesota 


69 


H 58 


Michigan State 


68 


■ 68 


Michigan 


83 


H 71 


Indiana 


85 


M 79 


Iowa 


82 


■D 71 


Purdue 


67 


1 ^^ 


Ohio State 


46 


Wm ^^ 


Northwestern 


62 


56 


Wisconsin 


57 


58 


Penn State 


61 


93 


Northwestern 


62 


78 


Ohio State 


67 


71 


Purdue 


74 


91 


Iowa 


86 


64 


Indiana 


76 


73 


Michigan 


62 


67 


Michigan State 


77 


66 


Minnesota 


67 




69 


Alabama 


72 




18 Wins J 13 Losses 



w^^ 




Did you know...coach Doug 

Mills' famous fivesome of Whiz 

Kids won back-lo'back Big Ten 

titles in J 942 and 1943. Using an 

offense that kept overflow crowds 

at Huff Gym on the edge of their 

seats, the Kids compiled a near 

fJohlcss Big fen mark nf 2^-2. 



ROLLER 
COASTER 



HENSON'S MEN BURST OUT OF GATES BEFORE SHOOTING, 
AND REBOUNDING SHORTCOMINGS COOL TEAM OFF 

Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Angara Rozgus 



For the past six years, Illinois 
basketball teams have been 
burdened with the scrutiny 
and comparisons to the famed 
Flying Illini that soared all the way 
to the 1989 Final Four. While this 
year's team did not approach those 
accomplishments, it was the closest 
facsimile to that centerless squad. 

After losing front line starters 
Shelly Clark and Robert Bennett, 
coach Lou Henson had his players 
sign a contract pledging to run and 
fast-break until they were removed 
from the game. Although the Illini 's 
lack of size necessitated the move, it 
worked wonders in the non-confer- 
ence portion of their schedule. 

After two ho-hum wins to open 
the season, the Illini pulled off the 
ultimate non-conference victory 
when they went into Cameron 
Indoor Stadium and shocked 
twelfth-ranked Duke, 75-65. The 
upset brought the Blue Devil's 95- 
game winning streak against non- 
conference visitors in cozy 
Cameron to a streaking halt. Illinois 
pulled off the shocker thanks to 
some clutch play down the stretch 
from point guard Kiwane Ganis. 

The junior led the way with 18 
points. Illinois overcame a horrid 10 
for 25 performance from the line 
and also rebounded from a blown 
16-point lead that evaporated early 
in the second half. Richard Keene 
and .Icrry Gee. both heavily recruit- 
ed by Duke, helped put the Devils 
away by combining lor 27 points 
and 20 rebounds. 

"I'ln not going lo tlo like some 



football coaches," Henson said after 
the stunning road win. "They go get 
a victory over some outstanding 
program and then they will say, T 
knew we were going to do it before 
the game.' I'm not about to say that 
because I didn't know that." 

The team rode that momentum 
and Keene's MVP play to its 17th 
Illini Classic tide in its 17-year his- 
tory. Illinois' lone senior continued a 
superb all-around start by totalling 
40 points and 10 assists in directing 
the offense to two blowout wins. 
Jerry Hester and freshman Ryan 
Blackwell joined Keene on the all- 
tournament team. 

"Keene had a tremendous tour- 
nament," Henson said. "He does a 
lot of things for us even when he's 
not scoring." 

Illinois ended a four-year string 
of frustration by edging Missouri in 
a thrilling, double-overtime edition 
of their annual border war. Garris 
burned Mizzou for 23 second-half 
points after the Tigers had held him 
to one field goal in the first 20 min- 
utes. Illinois lost Keene, who had 
another excellent floor game, to 
fouls late in regulation, but perse- 
vered 96-85 in two overtimes thanks 
to .lerry Hester's clutch shooting. 

Illinois climbed lo No. 12 in the 
polls and moved to ^)-0 in disposing 
of a talented California squad, 8.^- 
69, before a delighted holiday 
crowd at Chicago's United Center. 
Illinois opened up a .\5-l5 advan- 
tage, but would need Garris' 2.^ 
points to weather a nine-minute 
droutiht liom liie liekl that cut tlie 



lead to three. 

"I don't think we're ever going to 
be overconfident," emerging for- 
ward Bryant Notree said of letting : 
up after building the early 20-point i 
lead only to see it evaporate. 
"Nobody expected us to do anything . 
anyway." 

Illinois' run ended at the hands of 
highly-ranked Syracuse in a first- 
round matchup in Hawaii's ^ 
Rainbow Classic. The Orangemen's ! 
zone defense dared the Illini to win i 
from the perimeter, but they ' 
responded by shooting a meager 38 ' 
percent. Syracuse also used a size- 
able edge in free throws and an i 
untimely five-minute scoreless rut 
for Illinois to pull away after the 
break, 75-64. 

The Illini used two second-half 
rallies to overcome Hawaii and 
North Carolina State to close the ' 
non-conference season 11-1 and 
ranked 1 3th in the nation before div- 
ing into the rugged Big Ten slate. 

Illinois' lack of size and poor' 
shooting finally caught up to them. 
At Minnesota, the Gophers were 
able to grab 20 offensive rebounds 
and held Illini starters to two points 
in the first half. Hester broke out of 
a mini-slump with 20 points, but the 
Gophers won ugly, 69-64. 

Illinois slipped to 0-3 in Big Ten 
play after dropping decisions to 
Michigan State and Michigan. Once 
again, the Illini were roughed up by 
more imposing front lines and could 
not hit trom the perimeter. The 
Sjiartans pulled oil the damaging 
roati win thanks lo a 4S-3() rebound- 



ims!«s» 



/ 



\ N 




I That's a three ^ 

An Indiana defender W^t in time 
to stop Richard Keen ma -om. 
launching a three-pointer from 
beyond the arc. Illindj^^u^ 
senior, Keene finis heW^Kmlini 
career as one of the Big Ten's top 
five long-range shoo\ 
time. 




at 




Men's Basketb^ 



183 



Ever higher 

Using his left arm to 

clear out Michigan 

State forward Jon 

Garawiglia, Bryant 

Notree lays the ball 

A-,;,.. ... .Motree's 

■fits and 8 

nds were not 

enough as the 

Spartans stole away 

with a 68-58 road 

win. 



'-Ta * . ' 



IW 




iwlH^- 






> « 



\r^ 



184 SPORTS 



! ' 



iMMC Johnson 



^ssamtoi^ 




I Happy homecoming 

In the annual United Center home 
game in Chicago, Jeriy Gee rises 
for a jumper in the lane against 
Claifornia. Illinois used an early 
burst to clip the ranked Bears 83- 
69 and upped its record to 9-0. 



ing advantage and increasingly cold 
shooting from the Illini. 

Without Garris, the Wolverines 
weathered Illinois' best shot in the 
first 20 minutes before it responded 
with a strong dose of 300-pound 
manchild Robert "Tractor" Traylor. 
Traylor muscled through Illinois' 
interior for 18 points and 1 1 boards. 
Fellow Wolverine starters Maurice 
Taylor and Maceo Baston combined 
to chip in 30 more points down low. 

Assembly Hall was not any 
kinder to the Illini as they welcomed 
archrival Indiana that weekend. The 
Hoosiers distanced themselves from 
the Illini in the last five minutes 
thanks to 39 points from forwards 
Brian Evans and Andrae Patterson 
as well as a huge advantage from the 
free throw line. 

"When you get a kid hurt like 
Garris, who's so responsible for 
what they do and makes them very 
good, it knocks the hell out of you in 
a variety of ways," Hoosiers coach 
Bob Knight said. "It's a shame from 
their standpoint, because they had a 



great start to the season and really 
had things going their way." 

Still surging on without Garris, 
Illinois travelled to Iowa and turned 
in a valiant effort only to be turned 
away at the end, 82-79. Henson's 
club had the Hawkeyes right where 
they wanted them, down one with 
less than two minutes left, but 
Hester's emergence (21 points off 
the bench) went for naught as the 
Illini dropped their fifth straight to 
open the Big Ten season. 

A sixth loss loomed at imposing 
Mackey Arena, home of the two-time 
defending Big Ten champion Purdue 
Boilemiakers. But Ganis came back 
just in the nick of time to steal the 
victory for Illinois. He only scored 
nine points, but Ganis also owned 
the game's biggest four-a driving 
layup oft" a timeout with less than a 
minute left and the clinching free 
throws with five seconds remaining 
that sealed the Boilers' fate. 

"Kiwane was the main factor in 
the game tonight," Henson said. 
"Our players played with a lot more 



confidence tonight, and Garris was 
one reason for that. If he's not out 
there, we don't win the ballgame." 

Illinois transfened the momen- 
tum it had gained in West Lafayette 
back home in the first half against 
hapless Ohio State. The Illini put the 
Buckeyes out of their misery early, 
building leads of 13-0. 23-3 and 41- 
16 at halftime. Blackwell lead the 
team eftort with 14 points, while 
Gairis and Hester both added 12 in a 
77-46 laugher. 

The Illini kept taking advantage 
of a soft middle portion of their Big 
Ten slate with a 74-62 victory at 
Northwestern. Gams was the head- 
line scorer with 20 points, but Gee's 
12 second half points and 11 
rebounds enabled his team to pull 
away from the pesky Wildcats, who 
trailed only 59-54 at one point. 

With a three-game winning 
streak and Garris rapidly approach- 
ing 100 percent, confidence was 
returning to Champaign. Illinois had 
a full week to prepare for visiting 

CONTINUED ON PAGE 1 86 



MEN 



KETBALL 185 



CONTINUED ON PAGE 1 86 

Wisconsin, whicii limped into the 
contest a decided underdog. 

Illinois let UW hang around the 
whole game until the Badgers 
jumped up and bit the Illini by scor- 
ing the game's last 10 points to pull 
off a 57-56 stunner. Illinois got litde 
else from anyone except Hester, 
who carried the Illini with 22 points. 

■'In the 22 years I've been here, 
this may have been the worst game 
we've played," Henson lamented. 
"We were very pathetic offensively. 
We wouldn't have scored with 
nobody on us." 

Illinois' NCAA chances slipped 
even further after a loss at confer- 
ence upstart Penn State. Once again, 
the Illini shot under 40 percent from 
the field, failing to capitalize on an 
inspired defensive effort. 

Northwestern and Ohio State 
proved to be just what the doctor 
ordered once again as the Illini 
began the second half of the Big Ten 
loop. Illinois pounded the under- 



manned Wildcats from the opening 
tip, cruising to a 31 -point win made 
possible by some rare form from the 
perimeter. Illinois torched NU's 
zone defense for eight trey's in the 
rout, including five from Garris. 

The Illini didn't gain any fashion 
points in a gutty road win over the 
Buckeyes, overcoming injuries to 
Hester and Keene as well as an 
early 11 -point deficit. 

The mini's chances took another 
hit with another home loss there for 
the taking, this time to three-time 
conference champion Purdue. The 
Boilers, specifically Roy Hairston 
(25 points), exacted revenge on the 
Illini for their earlier road win by 
holding off a late charge. 

But Illinois rebounded again 
with an emotional victory over 
Iowa. Keene burned the nets for a 
career-high 25 points and six of the 
mini's record 14 treys. Notree also 
registered a personal best 18 as 
Illinois defeated the Hawks, after 
which Henson announced his retire- 



ment at season's end. 

The roller coaster ride continued 
when Henson's men fell short at 
Indiana. Evans had 25 points, includ- 
ing eight in a decisive 17-0 run as the 
Hoosiers distanced themselves from 
Illinois and cruised to a 1 2-point win. 

An inspired team playing for its 
postseason life followed that up with a 
73-62 conquest of Michigan. Keene 
continued to pace the Illini, scoring 1 8 
key points. But Illinois dug an early 
hole at Michigan State, going into half- 
time down by 13. The Illini rallied to 
within three before they ran out of gas 
on both ends of the floor, bowing to the 
Spaitans. 

After a heartbreaking loss to 
Minnesota in the regular season finale, 
a contest in which the Illini blew a 10- 
point halftime lead, Illinois had no 
answers for Alabama's barrage from 
the perimeter. The Crimson Tide ended 
Illinois' season and Henson's career by 
pulling away in the second half of the 
NIT opener, a game that mirrored 
Illinois' season in many ways. 



I That's mine 

Despite being pushed by 
Indiana standout Brian 
Evans, lone freshman 
Ryan Blackwell fights to 
wrestle a rebound from 
teammate Chris Gandy. 
The Hoosiers' 85-71 victo- 
ry dropped the Illini to 0-4 
in the Big Ten before 
Kiwane Garris ' return. 




Tsssmsm 



\ 




Una crowd 

\As a trio of Ohio State defenders converges, Richard Keene rises for the shot. Illinois jumped all over 
\the Buckeyes for a 41-16 halftime lead before cruising to a 77-46 blowout win at Assembly Hall. 



Men's BASKETBi 



87 



i 




I Too little, too late 

Before they know it, Kiwaiie Garris streaks hy Nort/nvestern's defense for two of his 20 points 
in the lllini\s 74-62 victory. Illinois' conqnest of the Wildcats marked Garris' first start since he 

injured his shoulder against Michigan State. 



188 



Sports 



THE END OF AN ERA 



Even though Lou Henson 
paced the Ilhnois sidehne for 
the last time this March, his 
images, which became synonymous 
with the program and university 
over his 2 1 -year career, will burn on 
in the minds of Illini basketball fans 
for years to come. 

"It is with a deep sense of grati- 
tude, of great pride and nostalgia, 
that 1 wish to announce my intention 
to retire," Henson said after his 
squad's emotional 91-86 home win 
over archrival Iowa. But to the sur- 
prise of shaken Orange and Blue 
fans throughout the state, the emo- 
tional part had just begun. 

Henson 's record spoke for itself. 
The Okay, Okla., native finished the 
regular season with a 664-329 
record, including a remarkable 424- 
222 run in Champaign. He took an 
Illini program mired in the Big 
Ten's lower division and molded it 
into both a perennial NCAA 
Tournament qualifier and Top 25 
product. 

Henson, who earned both 



National and Big Ten Coach of the 
Year honors in his tenure in 
Champaign, averaged over 20 wins 
per season and helped numerous 
players on to successful careers in 
the NBA. 

His most successful season came 
in 1989, when he guided a group of 
centerless wonders known as the 
Flying Illini to 31 wins, the top of 
the polls and all the way to the Final 
Four before being edged in the 
semifinals. The trip to Seattle made 
Henson, who turned the trick at New 
Mexico State before coming to 
Illinois, one of only a handful of 
coaches to take two different 
schools to the Final Four. 

Even an NCAA investigation fol- 
lowing the storybook season which 
resulted in sanctions could not keep 
Henson down, and Illinois enjoyed a 
quick return to national prominence. 
Unfortunately, Henson 's retire- 
ment was accelerated by critics and 
rivals alike. They argued that Illinois 
had not won the Big Ten title out- 
right since 1952, that the college 



game and its star-oriented system 
had passed him up. Henson selfless- 
ly chose to step aside and sacrifice 
fulfilling the last year of his con- 
tract, passing on a golden opportuni- 
ty for a parting shot or going-out 
party, two things that were never a 
part of Henson's vocabulary. 

"I didn't want this to affect our 
recruiting adversely, and I think it 
would have," Henson said. "I would 
have liked to coach another year, but 
it would have hurt our recruiting." 

Henson's retirement triggered a 
wave of wild speculation concern- 
ing his successor, including talk of 
Duke's Mike Krzyzewski, Utah's 
Rick Majerus and longtime Henson 
assistant Jimmy Collins. The rumors 
were a fitting testament to how far 
Henson took the Illinois program. 

The signature rust orange sport- 
coats and Lou Do coiffe have faded 
into Illini history, leaving Illinois 
fans to cope with the fact that you 
really do not know what you have 
until it's gone. The answer, quite 
simply, was a living legend. 



i 

i 

i 

4 



I So long, Lou 

After calling it quits after a memo- 
rable 21 -year run at Illinois, coach 
Lou Henson 's retirement signals a 
new era for the Illini basketball pro- 
gram. Henson, the seventh-win- 
n ingest active coach at season 's 
end, used his trademark defensive 
style to transform Illinois from 
mediocrity to a perennial tourna- 
ment team, including his 1989 
Flying Illini that advanced to the 
Final Four 



< 



/' 




Men 



:iil,^:- 



BASKETBALL 



1 By the Numbers 1 


Ul 




Opp 


88 


UNC-Greensboro 


71 


60 


Georgia Tech 


70 


89 


Xavier 


98 


57 


Louisville 


69 


72 


Missouri 


54 


65 


Southern Illinois 


57 


76 


Illinois State 


74 


67 


Florida 


53 


73 


Northern Arizona 


85 


64 


Iowa 


73 


83 


Northwestern 


95 


47 


Purdue 


88 


88 


Arkansas 


64 


75 


Indiana 


63 


87 


Minnesota 


76 


92 


Michigan 


77 


67 


Wisconsin 


68 


79 


Penn State 


105 


72 


Ohio State 


88 


84 


Michigan 


73 


96 


Minnesota 


71 


78 


Indiana 


64 


61 


Michigan State 


67 


77 


Purdue 


82 


68 


Northwestern 


75 


55 


Iowa 


73 


84 


Indiana 


70 


55 


Iowa 


74 


13 Wins 1 75 Losses 1 



nvia 

Did you know...Jirst'yedrhead 
coach Theresa Grentz brought a 
\superb resume lo Champaign last 
year. The former fiiUgers coach 
has garnered Nat'iQrtal Coach of 
the Year honors, is a member of 

the Nike Hall of Fame and 

f^uided the J 992 Olympic s^uad 

t(i (I hronrip medut 



INSTANT 
EXCITEMENT 



GRENTZ'S ARRIVAL, DYNAMIC BACKCOURT DUO SPELL 
IMMEDIATE RESPECTABILITY FOR WOMEN'S PROGRAM 

Story by Steve Hanf • Layout by Jill Kogan 



All signs pointed to a com- 
mitment to winning when 
the University of Illinois 
signed Theresa Grentz to the 
women's basketball head coaching 
position on May 15, 1995. 

Grentz came to the Illini from 
Rutgers University, where she spent 
19 years amassing the eighth high- 
est winning percentage in women's 
hoops history. She came to an Illini 
team that looked like it would strug- 
gle before helping add to that total, 
and Grentz looked forward to the 
challenge of rebuilding a team that 
finished tied for last in the Big Ten 
the previous season with a 3-13 
conference mark. 

"I want this group to realize it 
can win," Grentz said. "We're not 
going to allow others to set stan- 
dards for ourselves. The players are 
the ones that have to get tired of the 
team's perception and want to 
change." 

At the Big Ten women's basket- 
ball media day, the Illini were 
pegged by opposing conference 
coaches to finish dead last in the 
1995-96 season. A lack of size, 
quickness, strength and firepower 
made Illinois look like an easy win 
lor conference powers like Purdue, 
Wisconsin and Penn State. 

Grentz did have her hands iull- 
lull of 14 women who she began 
to moid into a cohesive, competi- 
tive unit on the court. The Illini 
had five sophomores and lour 



upperclassmen returning from last 
year's squad as the foundation of 
the team, and the Illini took a lik- 
ing to Grentz's enthusiasm for the 
game. 

"Coming off last year, there's 
really nowhere to go but up," 
sophomore guard Kelly Bond said. 
"Coach Grentz has been a huge fac- 
tor. She brings so much energy, you 
just look to her to help you and talk 
you through things." 

Stepping up in the 1995-96 sea- 
son for the Illini was the backcourt 
duo of sophomores Krista Reinking 
and Ashley Berggren. Reinking led 
the Illini attack as the point guard 
and 3-point threat, while Berggren 
drove to the basket and crashed the 
boards for Illinois. 

Berggren led the Big Ten in scor- 
ing with a 25 points per game aver- 
age. The 5-foot-9 guard was also 
second in the conference in 
rebounding (9.4), third in free 
throw percentage (.814), seventh in 
steals (2) and tenth in field goal per- 
centage (.492). 

"Ashley just works hard," 
Grentz said. "There are no secrets 
to her game. Every day is a new 
learning experience for her." 

Berggren was helped out in the 
backcourt by Reinking at the point. 
Reinking led the Big Ten in 3-point- 
ers per game with three and was 
sixth in scoring at 16 points per 
game. Reinking was also eighth in 
the league in assists, setting up her 



teammates an average of 4 times 
per game. 

"At the beginning of the season, 
I was playing the two-guard and 
was forcing a lot of shots," 
Reinking said. "Now, at the point, I 
realize my points are going to 
come, and the shots I've been hit- 
ting have been because of good ball 
movement." 

Grentz's infusion of enthusiasm 
helped spark the team to early sea- 
son wins over No. 23 Florida and 
No. 14 Arkansas. Illinois stayed 
confident despite a three-game skid 
and pulled off a four-game winning 
streak, starting with the stunning 
88-64 home win over Arkansas. 
The Illini were a confident bunch as 
they began their second loop 
around the Big Ten. 

Although Illinois finished 13-15 ' 
overall and 6-10 in the Big Ten, 
including a quarterfinal loss to 
powerful and top-seeded Iowa at 
the tournament in Indianapolis, it 
landed one of the top five recruiting . 
classes in the nation. And despite 
this being just her first year in the 
conference, Grentz was prepared to 
fight and ready for her squad to 
win. The team is coming together 
and the fans are starting to fill Huff. 

"Probably the only nutty person 
that thinks we can win is myself," 
Grent/ said. "But the future is com- 
ing. 1 don't think people are going 
lo like bringing their teams into 
Huff too much anymore." 




I Getting by 

In a 73-63 triumph over 
Indiana, center Cindi Hamm 
whirls and drives past Hoosier 
standout Lisa Furlin. Hanna, a 
senior, brought down six\ 
rebounds in the home win 



I Head up 

Looking for a teammate to 
pass to, sophomore point 
guard Krista Reinking 
penetrates against^L 
Michigan. Reinkii^P^ 
poured in 25 points 
against the Wolverines to 
help the Illini to a^^-77 
victory. 



I Two shots 

Splitting the Ohio State defense, sophomore 
guard Ashley Berggren is fouled by 
Buckeye Tiffany Glosson. Berggren, the Big 
Ten's leading scorer, burned OSU for 26 
points and 15 rebounds in Illinois' 88-72 
loss. 



Women's basketb 




191 




WRESTLING 



1 By the Numbers I 


Ul 




Opp 


38 


SlU-Edwardsville 


6 


19 


Purdue 


13 


2nd 


Virginia Duals 




19 


Northwestern 


14 


18 


Minnesota 


19 


17 


Micliigan 


19 


43 


Northern Illinois 


3 


35 


Eastern Illinois 


6 


11 


Michigan State 


26 


15 


Indiana 


16 


15 


Nebraska 


19 


30 


Eastern Michigan 


6 


22 


Ohio State 


9 


35 


Northern Iowa 


6 


7 7 M^/ns 1 6 Losses 



rffiS 



/)/</ VOH know...the Big Teh is the 

I premier conference fur wrestling 

by a landslide. In fact, Illinois' 

explosion into the Top Ten 

becomes even more impressive 

considering that all II Big Ten 

I squads were nationally ranked in 



poll this |}' 



REVERSAL 
OF FORTUNE 



JOHNSON AND HIS WRESTLERS SHAKE BIG TEN 
DOORMAT LABEL IN PURSUIT OF NATIONAL TITLE 

Story by Patrick Windhorst • Layout by Lisa Wli ite n acl< 






Coming off a season which 
featured two individual 
NCAA champions and a 
ninth-place team finish in the 
NCAA Championships, hopes 
were high for the Illinois wrestling 
team. The Illini finished last sea- 
son with a 13-2 overall record and 
a 6-1 Big Ten record, and entered 
this campaign with many of its top 
young performers returning to the 
squad. 

Illinois began the season ranked 
11th in the nation and opened its 
competition in the St. Louis Open 
in November. Junior Ernest Benion, 
who won an NCAA Championship 
last year, claimed the 158-pound 
crown at St. Louis. 

"This is the best we've wrestled 
at the St. Louis Open since we've 
been going to the tournament," 
coach Mark Johnson said. 

The Illini next journeyed to 
Madison, Wis., to compete in the 
Northern Open. Eric Siebert took 
the 150-pound title and went 5-0 in 
claiming his first Northern Open 
title, pushing record to 8-1 . 

On December 29 and 30, Illinois 
participated in the Midlands 
Championships, one of the most 
prestigious collegiate wrestling 
tournaments in the country. The 
Illini boasted three placers in the 
annual event that tlrcw more ihan 
40 schools. 

Illinois opcncti its Big Ten 
schedule witha 19-13 victory over 
.!' I si ranked I'ukIuc on .Ian. 7 at 



Huff Gym. The Illini prevailed in 
six of 10 matches, including 
Benion's victory at 158. his first 
since returning from the knee 
injury. Lindsey Durlacher also post- 
ed a key victory against a highly- 
ranked Boilermaker. 

The Illini then travelled to the 
Virginia Duals, which featured 
seven other ranked squads. In the 
second round, Illinois defeated No. 
13 Michigan. 

The next day, Illinois started by 
upsetting No. 5 Oklahoma in the 
semifinals. The Illini won seven of 
10 matches from the Sooners. In the 
finals, Illinois could only muster 
four wins against seventh-ranked 
Minnesota, forcing the Illini to set- 
tle for a second-place finish. 

"Naturally we were disappointed 
that we weren't coming home with 
the championship trophy, but over- 
all. I'm happy with the way we per- 
formed over the last two days," 
Johnson said. "We beat two ranked 
teams and finished higher than we 
did last year. (Oklahoma) was a 
good win for the whole program." 

Freshman Karl Roesler, who 
clinched the Michigan victory with 
his win at 190 pounds and went 2-0 
in the tournament, compared his 
individual success to the team's. 

"You never want to seuic for loss 
ihan your best, bul I think wo tiiti 
well as a team." Roesler said o\ 
Illinois' ruiHierup status. 

After ihc impressive show ing in 
Virginia. Illinois lra\e!led \o 



Evanston to seek revenge against. 
Minnesota and battle No. 201 
Northwestern in a triangular meet.i 
The Illini fell to the Gophers 19-18J 
for the second time in one week, 
but they defeated the Wildcats to 
manage a split for the day. 

"We don't like wrestling a Big 
Ten team more than once, but 
Minnesota is our nemesis right 
now," Jon Vaughn said. "Losing tO' 
Minnesota by one point is frustrat-i 
ing for all of us." 

At 6-2 (2-1 in the Big Ten), 
Illinois jumped to eighth in the pollsl' 
before a rematch with Michigan ati 
Huff Gym. The Wolverines sur-ii 
prised the Illini by winning the meeli 
19-17 and pinning Benion at 158; 
The meet featured upsets by both 
teams, and was eventually decided 
by the heavyweights. 

After two laughers againsi 
intrastate rivals, the Illini fell to 
ranked foes Michigan State. Indians 
and Nebraska, taking the No. 2 
Cornhuskers to the final match 
before the meet was decided. 

Illinois got off the canvas anc 
solidified its No. 10 ranking at tlu 
expense of Eastern Michigan. Ohic 
State and Northern Iowa bcfort 
competing in the Big Ten anc 
NCA.'X Championships. A 
presslinic, Ihc Illini wore coiniliiu 
on making an c\cn bigger splasi 
than last year in the postseason. 

"We're a M)ung team." Benioi 
sail!. ".Aiul we're on Ihc brink o 
boni!: a roalK eieal Icam." 




-Joel Rennich 




I Make a wish 

Getting a leg up on his Northern Illinois 
counterpart, national champion Ernest 
Benion takes control in a 158-pound match 
at Huff Gym. Benion also can be seen 
singing the national anthem at various 
sporting events on campus. 

I Whatever it takes 

Resorting to illegal methods, a Northern 
Illinois heavyweight tugs on Seth Brady 's 
uniform. Brady, a senior, was one of the 
major reasons for Illinois ' resurgence as he 
became one of the top 10 heavyweights in 
the nation. 



Wrestling 



193 




GYMNASTICS 



I By the Numbers I 



Windy City 

Michigan State 

Penn State 

Iowa 

Oklahoma 

New Mexico 

Illinois-Chicago 

Stanford 

California 

Santa Barbara 

Michigan 

Big Tens 

Regionals 

NCAAs 



Season Schedule 



rivia 



know.. .the men 's 
gymnastics program has won a 
record nine NCAA crowns and 
22 Bifi Ten titles. In fact, in the 
lust 35 years, the Illini own the 
only two national titles won at 



TUNNEL 
VISION 



STEEPED IN TRADITION, MEN'S GYMNASTICS PROGRAM 
FOCUSES ON RETURNING TO NATION'S ELITE 

Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Jill Kogan 



Although it may not be 
common knowledge, there 
is no disputing the fact 
that no other athletic program at 
Illinois has dominated its sport as 
much as the men's gymnastics pro- 
gram. Since the team's inception 
almost 90 years ago, the Illini have 
won more NCAA and Big Ten 
Championships than any school. 

So when coach Don Osborn's 
squad failed to advance to the 
NCAA Regional meet last year, the 
gymnastics community took notice. 
Illinois did, however, use the home- 
gym advantage to improve to a 
fifth-place finish in the Big Ten 
meet at Huff Gym. 

"Last season, injuries were the 
main thing that didn't enable us to 
make it to regionals," newcomer 
Yuval Ayalon pointed out. "This 
year, we have brought in some good 
freshmen and we're healthy at this 
point, so we're stronger as a team 
and we should do better." 

In its climb back to the top of the 
conference, Illinois has been led by 
a solid, albeit young, nucleus. 
According to Osborn, the experi- 
enced trio of 1995 Big Ten 
Freshman of the Year Ayalon, junior 
Greg McGlaun and lone senior 
Goncala Macedo have been the 
mini's high scorers for the past two 
seasons. Halfway through this sea- 
son, they have helped the team 
overcome some key losses from 
graduation. 

"I.asi year we had quile a few 



seniors that helped us out in indi- 
vidual events that are hard to 
replace," Osborn noted. "We are 
more balanced this year, though. 
We're relying much more on the 
all-around performers, and they're 
doing quite a good job." 

A clean bill of health has trans- 
lated into a huge head start for this 
year's Illini, evidence that a year 
can make a big difference. 

"This year, we're starting out a 
lot better," junior captain Matt 
Redman noticed. "We were basical- 
ly trying to catch up the entire sea- 
son last year. Once you've been 
here more, you learn what you have 
to do. We're doing the right things 
to get us where we want to be." 

Ayalon and his teammates will 
have their work cut out for them if 
they are to continue their ascent in 
the conference standings. The Big 
Ten is a perennially strong confer- 
ence that makes its presence felt at 
the NCAA meet every year. 

"The Big Ten is extremely com- 
petitive," Osborn said. "On any 
given day. teams will flip-flop posi- 
tions. We're looking to have our 
best meet at the Big Ten 
Championships this year, and we're 
hoping to do a lot better." 

"Right now. the top learn in llic 
Big Ten is Ohio State," Osborn 
said. "Minnesota (the defending 
champions) will be close. After that, 
any team couki make a run al those 
two, and we expect lo be one of 
them." 



With a relatively young team, 
the regular season will take on even ' 
more importance as the Illini pre- 
pare for the one-day, do-or-die i 
atmosphere that has cracked many a . 
gymnast at the Big Ten and nation- 
al competitions. Osborn accounted t 
for this when mapping a course fori 
this season. 

"By the end of the season, we'll I 
be used to it," Osborn predicted, i 
"We're in a lot of different invita-i 
tional meets this year that will have 
the same format as the regional 
competition, where you're going up 
against six teams at the same time. 
That should give us an edge." 

"We have a team that can be in 
the top three," Ayalon said. "Ifl 
we are consistent and hit our sets, 
we are among the best in the con- 
ference. It all depends on how we 
develop and build our confidence 
throughout the season. We know 
we have the right stuff and are 
capable to make it to nationals." 

Though the Illini were still 
competing in regular season dual 
meets at presstime, their strength 
in the horizontal bar has served 
them well. Osborn and compain 
are generally pleased with whoi\ 
they have positioned themsehos 

"We always want to do betii-'i 
but we're sicatlily progressiiiL' 
meet after meet."' Osborn said.' 
"And that's what we're really 
looking for. If we can keep thai 
pace, we'll bo right llicre in the 
ciul." 



I Textbqok form 

i! 

On his wciy to earn- 
ing a high mark, 
standout Goncalo 
Macedo f^rforms 
his floor qxercise 
routine at Huff Gym. 
Macedo, who hails 
from Portugal, fin- 
ished 19 til in the 
nation as an all- 
around performer 
last year t 




§ Perfect 10 

The only senior on Illinois' team, Goncalo Macedo 
performs on the pommel horse at the Big Ten meet. 
Macedo is one of the NCAA's best in the event, as 
'evidenced by his 1 6th-place finish in the nation two 
years ago. 



I Free falling 

Soaring above the bar, junior 
Greg McGlaun performs at the 
Big Ten Championships last 
spring. McGlaun, recipient of 
Illinois' Most Outstanding 
Award in 1995, was the nation's 
best high bar peformer the year 
before as a freshman. 



Men's Gymnastics 



195 




I Coming down 

Sonwrsaiilfini^ throiii^h the air, Kristin Montcro iiab 

herself in hopes of a flawless dismount of her heath 

routine. Montero. a sophomore, scored a career- 

iiii^h 'A5 on the hccnn at Penn State last year 






AIMING 
HIGHER 



GYMNASTS CELEBRATE THIRD YEAR OF BRUECKMAN 
ERA WITH SUCCESSFUL RESULTS 

Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Jill Kogan 



It has not taken coach Lynn 
Crane Brueckman long to make 
her mark on IlHnois' women's 
gymnastics team. 

I Before coming to Champaign 
three short years ago, Brueckman 
saw success on the national level as 
3oth a gymnast at Penn State and a 
:oach at Florida. And she has 
^hown no signs of expecting any 
ess for the Illini, especially after 
ast year, the most successful season 
in Illinois history. 

"We broke every school record, 
;eam record and individual record 
n the book," Brueckman noted. 
'As far as our win-loss record and 
Inish in the Big Ten meet, it may 
lot look like a great season, but it 
ivas. 

"We've upped our goals and 
jtandards, so we're looking for 
;ome great improvement this year. 
kVe're very excited and the girls 
vant to win as badly as I do." 

Illinois returns three individuals 
-vho qualified for the NCAA 
Regional meet last season: sopho- 
nores Stacy Redmond and Kelli 
^arrar joined senior-turned-assis- 
ant coach Nicole Ward at regionals. 
Redmond, the Illini's top all- 
irounder, successfully recovered 
[Tom off-season ankle and wrist 
tiurgery. 

"We made a lot of progress last 



year that carried on to this year," 
Farrar said. "It motivated us 
because we knew we could do even 
better this year. We're coming 
together as a team really well. 

"We busted our butts in the pre- 
season, and it's showing now. 
Everybody working hard together 
brought us close. We have even 
more potential than we've shown." 

That is a source of optimism in 
the Illinois camp, especially after a 
pivotal upset of Minnesota early in 
the season. The formidable Gophers 
are one of the teams blocking the 
Illini from their dream of a Big Ten 
Championship, a banner they would 
like to hang from Kenney Gym's 
rafters next year. 

Although the Illini will not have 
the luxury of hosting the Big Ten 
meet this year, they expect to con- 
tend for the title. According to 
Brueckman, Michigan, Penn State 
and Michigan State will be Illinois' 
main obstacles. 

"This year is the strongest the 
Big Ten has been," Brueckman 
said. "The accumulation of a whole 
season all comes down to one day, 
so it's going to be ultra-competitive. 
We're going for the No. 1 spot, and 
it's open for us." 

One reason that Illinois is in 
position to challenge for the top spot 
and qualify for regionals for the first 



time this decade is that Brueckman 
has assembled three consecutive 
stellar recruiting classes. 

"We're constantly looking for great 
athletes, and the Midwest provides us 
with a really good base of good gym- 
nasts," Brueckman said. "But we have 
expanded our range and we are now 
going out further to get athletes." 

There is no greater example of 
Brueckman's emphasis on recruiting 
than this year's freshmen and their 
contribution to the team. 
Becky Ashton and Kim Berres have 
stepped right in as Illinois' top two all- 
around scorers in their first season of 
intercollegiate competition. 

"They're all very different, yet. 
when they come in the gym, they all 
are going after a common goal." 
Brueckman said. "They know they 
have to work extremely hard, so they 
push each other" 

"Last year was a huge turnaround 
in that the whole attitude of the team 
was completely different," Natalie 
Forsthoefel, Illinois' top performer on 
the bars, said. "The record may not 
have shown it, but everyone improved 
vastly skillwise. We're a year older 
now. We've had success, so we know 
what it feels like, and we don't want to 
give that up." 

If Brueckman and her driven team 
continue this amazing resurgence, 
they should not have to. 



WOMENf 




GYMNASTICS 



I By the Numbers I 



Illinois-Chicago 

Bahamas Invite 

Michgan State 

Minnesota 

Ohio State 

Northern Illinois 

Iowa 

Illinois State 

Ball State 

Illinois State 

SE Missouri State 

Florida 

Illinois Classic 

Big Tens 

NCAA Regionals 

NCAAs 



Season Schedule 



Did von know..Jhe w^iim's 

gymnastics team claimed the first 

Big Ten women's title oj any kind 

in 1975. The Illini, who repeated 

as champions in 1976, were led 

by Olympian Nancy Thies, who 

won two Big Ten titles herself. 



LL^'^^u'-' 




SWIMMING 



1 By the Numbers 1 


Ul 




Opp 


4th 


NU Relays 




89 


Penn State 


257 


103 


California 


238 


111 


Southern Illinois 


74 


74 


Cincinnati 


68 


99 


Northern Illinois 


66 


64 


Missouri 


49 


24 


Kansas 


69 


1st 


Miami Invite 




39 


Miami 


56 


55 


Notre Dame 


38 


55 


Broward College 


27 


130 


Indiana 


157 


94 


Northwestern 


185 


1st 


mini Classic 




124 


Ohio 


170 


59 


Ohio State 


51 


162 


Illinois State 


123 


8 wins 1 7 losses 



rfWt 



\Did you know...diver Robin Duffy 

represented the swimming and 

diving program on Illinois' 

All-Decade Team selected in 

1991 to commemorate the lOth 

anniversary of women 's athletics 



I 




III 



UShM 



TOEING 
THE LINE 



TEAM COMPETES AGAINST NATION'S BEST AS IT 
PREPARES TO MAKE A RUN AT RANKING 

Story by Ismail Turoy, Jr. • Layout by Jill Kogan 



Though it finished the regular 
season a mere 1-3 in the Big 
Ten and 8-7 overall, the 
Illinois swim team had a great sea- 
son. The mini accomplished a lot 
and moved up another level in their 
quest for a national title. 

"What we tried to do this year is 
step up the caliber of competition that 
we faced by scheduling tougher 
meets," coach Jim Lutz said. "And that 
is why our record didn't look so great." 

Since his arrival at Illinois three 
years ago, Illinois' record has constant- 
ly improved. This also marks the sec- 
ond time since 1986 that the Illini have 
had back-to-back winning seasons. 

Despite Illinois' 9-3 record last 
season, Lutz felt that this year's team 
was better overall. The team's weak- 
nesses decreased because Lutz and his 
staff filled those areas with recruits. 

"This past season has been 
excellent," freshman Jeannine 
Povey said. "The team was so 
pumped up about everything. It's 
kind of like a snowball effect where 
everything seemed to be adding on 
lo everything else and there were 
liigh hopes everywhere. Overall, 
I've never been on a team that has 
such unity and acceptance from 
everybody." 

The team's confidence was also 
;i factor during the season. The Illini 
were especially confident and 
stingy at home, where it lost to only 
ilircc of nine teams. 

"They refuse to let anybody come 
ill here and beat Ihem in iheir own 



pool," assistant Mona Nyheim said. 

Illinois had various problems 
during the season. After winter 
break, several of its big guns had to 
sit out a couple of weeks because of 
injury or illness. Five Illini were 
sidelined with various ailments. 
Plus, all of Illinois' divers left the 
team in the middle of the season. 

"When they came as freshmen, 
they didn't know what to expect, so 
it was a learning experience for 
them," diving coach Rhonda Kaletz 
said. "By their sophomore year, they 
decided that's not what they wanted 
to do and decided they enjoyed 
other things more than diving." 

Kaletz added that next year's 
recruits are experienced divers, so 
she will run a tighter ship because 
she knows that they will stay on 
board. 

After a fourth-place finish at the 
Northwestern Relays to open the 
season, the Illini fell prey to Penn 
State and California, two of the 
highest-ranked teams in the coun- 
try. 

"They both had good teams, but 
it got us off racing pretty fast, which 
is always good," Lutz stated. "I'm 
not disappointed that it was a tough 
defeat or anything like that. It was 
definitely jumping into the fire with 
both feet." 

Kansas was also one of the 
loughesi opponents for Illinois. The 
Jayhawks snapped a four-meet win- 
ning sireak by a 69-24 score. 

Despite facing aulonialie point 



deficits going into their last five 
meets because they brought no 
divers, the Illini prevailed in four of 
them. Included in this streak was 
their first Big Ten victory at Ohio 
State on Jan. 27, 1996. Illinois also 
cruised past intrastate rival Illinois 
State in a home meet to close out 
the regular season at peak perfor- 
mance. 

Lutz wanted his swimmers to 
compete for evaluation purposes 
since the Big Ten Championships 
were near. 

At the Big Ten meet hosted by 
Minnesota, Illinois finished eight 
for the second year in a row. The 
Illini did, however, set a school 
record by scoring in every event. 
Illinois also eclipsed the 200-point 
barrier for the first time in a decade. 

Once again. Sands challenged 
for a spot at the national finals and 
finished the season ranked 23rd in 
the country. 

Looking ahead, Lutz and his staff 
will be working to land some of the 
top recruits in the country that will 
add that extra boost Illinois needs to 
move into the Top 25 rankings. 

To crack the polls, the Illini must 
improve in some areas. Lutz targeted 
the breast stroke and medley relays 
as events in which recruits could 
step into and contribute right away. 

'We could have the best team 
that's ever been at Illinois and end 
up with a losing record because we 
arc going to swim eight oi the top 
I.S teams in (he emuitrv," Lul/ said. 




I Speed demon 

Knifing 
the wate\ 
Illinois' 
in IMP 
more Lit 
compete, 
home m 
freshma 
was the 
mini in 
and 165 
freestyle 




-Sports Information 

I Up for air 

Swimming in her best 
event, the freestyle, 
sophomore Jennifer 
Sands distances her- 
self from her oppo- 
nents. Sands became 
the first Ilini ever to 
score at the NCAA 
Championships when 
she finished 13th in 
the 200-yard freestyle 
last year. 




-Sports Information 

I Coming In 

Showing textbook form, 
sophomore Renee 
Gamboa dives into a 
breaststroke race at 
IMPE. In only her first 
year of collegiate com- 
petition, Gamboa broke 
six Illinois records in 
individual and relay cat- 
egories. 



-Sports Information 



Swimming and Divi 



199 




HOCKEY 



1 By the Numbers 1 


Ul 


Opp 1 


3 
3 
3 

1 


Springfield Blues 

Springfield Blues 

Iowa State 

Iowa State 




5 
5 
4 
3 


7 
2 


Marquette 
Delaware 




2 

2 


3 


Towson State 




7 


2 
6 

5 
2 


Illinois-Chicago 

Wis-Whitewater 

Wis-Whitewater 

Ohio 




9 
1 
2 
9 


1 


Ohio 




10 


7 
7 


Michigan State 
Michigan State 




9 

4 


2 


Penn State 




6 


2 
4 


Penn State 
Iowa State 




9 

4 


5 


Iowa State 




6 


1 
2 
4 
3 


West Virginia 

Iowa State 

Mich-Dearborn 

Mich-Dearborn 




7 
4 
4 
1 


3 

2 
4 
9 
5 


Eastern Michigan 

Eastern Michigan 

Mich-Dearborn 

Kent State 

Kent State 




1 
5 
4 
1 
2 


1 


Arizona 




6 


1 


Arizona 




4 


3 
9 


Wis-Whitewater 
Wis-Whitewater 




3 

4 


3 


Penn State 




5 


3 


Penn State 




2 


10 Wins ^ 17 Losses 



!/* 



t- 



M 




Did you know...the Illiri 

Hubert Tumgren, owns the 
program's second-highest winning 

percentage (if .627 at 64-36-2. 

Turngren, who practices medicine 

and is a chairman of the Carle 

I Clinic Board, was a dejensenianj'or \ 

the llUnifrnin 1974-78, earning 

Rookie of the Year honors. 



WRONG 
DIRECTION 



ICEMEN UNABLE TO RISE ABOVE INCONSISTENCY THAT 
ELIMINATED THEM FROM POSTSEASON CONTENTION 

Story by Gar en Vortanian • Layout by Jill Kogan 



PORTS 



The 1995-96 season proved 
to be a difficult one for the 
mini hockey club. 

The mini lost five of their first 
seven games of the season and 
could never recover. Season-long 
inconsistency contributed to the 
team's downfall and failure to make 
a fourth consecutive trip to the 
National Tournament. 

Head coach Robert Turagren's 
squad was looking to get into the 
win column against bitter rival 
Iowa State. 

But the Cyclones swept the 
mini, 4-3 in overtime and 3-1, drop- 
ping their record to 0-4 on the sea- 
son. A victory against Marquette the 
following day became the Illini's 
first victory on the young season. 

"Though we lost both games to 
Iowa State, they were both very 
close," Turngren said. "Last year, 
we won a lot of games early, then 
floundered at the end. So we 
weren't shook by losing twice to 
Iowa State." 

Standing at 1-4-1, the Illini were 
in desperate need of two victories at 
home against Wisconsin- 

Whitewater. And they got just that. 
The illini whipped the Warhawks 
(wicc. 

"Wc definitely were scoring 
more this weekend," illini goalie 
Dcvin liuber said. "Things were 
going our way as opposed to nol 
going our way. The puck was jusl 
finding the net." 

The illini's monK'iiliini was 



short-lived, however, as the next 
weekend they travelled to the home 
of defending national champion 
Ohio. The Bobcats beat the Illini 9- 
2 and 10-1, dropping their record to 
3-6-1. 

"They won the national title last 
year and are undefeated this year," 
Turngren said. "They can send three 
or four lines at you, and they have 
even scoring." 

Michigan State was up next for 
Turngren's squad, and the Illini split 
a weekend series against the 
Spartans. They lost the first night 
before bouncing back with a 7-4 tri- 
umph the following evening. A trip 
to highly-rated Penn State awaited 
the Illini the next weekend. 

Tumgren said the Nittany Lions 
were similar to Ohio, and it showed. 
Penn State thumped the Illini twice, 
giving them five losses in six 
games. The Illini had little time to 
ponder the defeats with Iowa State 
invading the U of I Ice Arena six 
days later. The teams skated to a 4-4 
tie in the first game before Iowa 
State made it three out of four ver- 
sus the Illini. But the Cyclones' 
three wins were by a mere four 
goals. 

"We played good for 45 minutes 
of the game." team captain Emmett 
McCarthy said. "And we came back 
and almost tied il up al llic end." 

"ihc learn is struggling to find 
ils iilcntily lo a degree," Turngren 
said. "We Just tion'l ha\o ihe win- 
nini; allilude rit:hl now." 



The Illini started the new semes- 
ter with a fresh attitude. With that in 
mind, the Illini were looking to make 
a charge for postseason play, starting 
with a three-game stretch in 
Michigan. However Turngren's 
team dropped all three on the road- 
trip. 

Forced into a must-win situation, 
the mini responded with two deci- 
sive victories over Kent State, their 
first two-game sweep since 
October. And after a week off, the 
Arizona Icecats strolled into town 
for a weekend confrontation with 
the Illini. And the Icecats strolled 
right out of Champaign with two 
victories, all but eliminating the 
Illini from any postseason con- 
tention. 

The Illini tied and defeated 
Wisconsin- Whitewater to earn three 
points, but they were still eliminat- 
ed from the CSCHL tournament. 

In the final weekend, the Illini 
played for pride and the seniors 
against No. 2 Penn State. Those 
players making their last appear- 
ance at the "Big Pond" were sent 
out on a high note with a 3-2 \ icto- 
ry in the final game of tlie season. 
The illini finished 9-17-4. with a 
conference mark of 7-8-3. 

Overall. Tumgiisn said tlic illini's 
inabilily lo play 60 minutes of consisteni 
liivkcy plagued the le;un all ye;u'. 

"riial's the problem we've Ivcii 
having all year." Turngren said. 
"Wo Ikinc a i.ipse lung cnougli lo 
lose ihc iuK'kcN uanie. " 




I Breaking away 

Sporting the special 
orange throwback 
jersey, right wing Bill 
Liisson eludes a 
Michigan-Dearborn 
defender in a 3-1 
mini victory. 
Michigan -Dearborn 
ended up eliminating 
the mini from partic- 
ipating in the confer- 
ence tournament. 






~^^ 



I He shoots, he scores 

With Kent State's goalie 
sprawling, center Tom Radja 
flips a backhand shot over the 
outstretched stick and into the 
net. Meanwhile, winger Matt 
Digate fights off a defenseman 
in the crease. 

I Stick speed 

After the referee drops the 
puck for a faceoff in the Illini 
zone, left wing Mike Large 
claims the puck. Large was 
one of 17 freshmen playing on 
a young Illini squad. 



Men's Hockey 



20 1 






The] 

sent 
IMPE. 
receiver 
from 



Intercollegiate Athletics. 




I Aim high 

's wheelchair 
isketball team 
\ges weekly at 
\eam hopes to 
msed funding 

department of 



I Directing the offense 

The transition game is fast-paced os 

the women 's basketball team 

scrimmages at IMPE. The women 's 

baskelbali teatn provides a great deal 

of support for its athletes who arc 

disabled 



202 



i° 



RTS 



UNSUNG 
HEROES 



WHEELCHAIR ATHLETICS HAVE BECOME AN ILLINOIS 
STAPLE BEHIND THE SCENES 

Story by Stephen Wu n derl ich • Layout by Amara Rozgus 



Ask somebody about U of I 
sports, and they will 
quickly let you know 
about the trials and tribulations of 
the men's football and basketball 
teams' recent seasons. If you are 
lucky, they might even comment on 
swimming, wrestling or track and 
field. If you are really lucky, that 
same person might mention one of 
the women's teams. But only an act 
of divine intervention would make 
them mention one of the wheelchair 
athletic teams. 

The mini wheelchair programs 
recruit the finest academic and athlet- 
ic students from all across the United 
States. And most importantly, these 
programs bring a level of honor, 
prestige and class to the athletic 
department that cannot be measured 
in terms of financial success. 

The Fighting Illini men's wheel- 
chair basketball team first started in 
1948 on the Galesburg campus of 
the U of I. It was the first collegiate 
team in the U.S. From 1986 (when 
their name changed from the "Gizz 
'Kids" to the Fighfing Illini), through 
1 1 990, the team won both the Central 
Intercollegiate Conference 

Championship and the National 
Intercollegiate Championships. 

Josh Fabian, a scoring leader and 
co-captain of the team, is proud of 
:the men's basketball team's achieve- 



ments, but feels wheelchair sports 
are neglected by the university. 

"They're underfunded big time," 
Fabian said. "They're too big of a 
hassle for the university and they'd 
phase them out, but they're afraid to 
be sued." 

Fabian also thinks that the 
coaches are responsible for the 
teams' success since they push them 
even harder than the "able-bodied 
teams." While his time commitment 
to the team may have hurt him aca- 
demically, Fabian feels socially the 
program has been a big advantage. 

Jamie Sharpies, another member 
of the Fighfing Illini. also thinks the 
U of I has a great program for 
wheelchair athletics, yet more could 
be done. Since disabled students 
account for 1 to 2 percent of the 
population. Sharpies said, "If you 
took 2 percent of the Division of 
Intercollegiate Athletics budget 
($400,000) we would have more 
than sufficient money to operate. 
We get none of the budget." 

Despite this. Sharpies said it has 
been an incredible experience for 
him. In his native Pennsylvania, the 
opportunity would not have been 
there to play wheelchair sports. 

Another member of the team, 
Derek Brown, also thinks that the U 
of I has one of the best programs for 
disabled athletes in the country. He 



thinks it has helped him both acad- 
emically and socially. 

"You have a group of people 
you're automatically accepted into," 
Brown said. "Sports give you a cer- 
tain amount of confidence in your- 
self that transfers into academics." 

Brad Hedrick was the head 
coach of the Fighting Illini Men's 
and Women's Basketball Teams 
from 1981 to 1994. On coaching 
sabbatical, Hedrick is now interim 
director of rehabilitafion services. 
Like his former athletes, Hedrick 
also thinks that Illinois' disabled 
athletics programs is one of the best 
in the country, but gets by on only 
nominal support from the DIA. He 
says the problem stems from the 
NCAA. 

"Athletics for students with dis- 
abilities is not seen as desirable or 
operationally feasible in those 
structures that feed to collegiate 
levels," Hedrick explained. "The 
NCAA should not only underwrite 
disabled programs, but they should 
nurture them as well." 

Hopefully, the support for 
wheelchair athletics will improve as 
the university prepares to enter the 
21st Century. It would bring the 
same level of presfige that building 
a Hall of Fame for Illinois sports 
would bring — and at a much lower 
cost. 




1 By the Numbers 1 


Ul 




Opp 


69 


Southern Illinois 


24 


72 


Sangamon State 


17 


63 


Wisconsin-Whitewater 40 | 


51 


Southern Illinois 


22 


43 


Texas 


59 


57 


Nebraska 


10 


69 


NE Kansas 


25 


68 


Kansas City 


21 


68 


St. Louis 


54 


55 


St. Louis 


46 


51 


North Carolina 


53 


42 


Charlotte 


60 


55 


Richmond 


28 


64 


Roanoke 


38 


42 


NEP Virginia 


45 


71 


Northeast Kansas 


28 


81 


Kansas City 


15 


49 


Baylor 


50 


61 


Charlotte 


52 


58 


North Coast 


43 


62 


Baylor 


50 


38 


Dallas 


74 


56 


St. Louis 


45 


49 


Wisconsin-Whitewater 48 


47 


Texas 


45 


50 


Wisconsin 


56 


54 


North Coast 


61 


23 Wins 1 9 Losses 



rivia 



Did you know. ..Illinois hosted the\ 
first National Intercollegiate 

Wheelchair Basketball 
Tournament and the Fighting 
Illini were one of the charter 

members of the Central 
Intercollegiate Conference. 

-~ """ """ p^ii^i ill j 



WHEELCHi 




i I North view 

The constuction on the 

Bielfeldt athletic complex 

has been going on throught 

the 1994-1995 school year. 

I Future hall of fame 

Bielfeldt was built to support 

athletic programs. It should 

be a reality by early spring 

of 1996. 



-Caria Schoepfle 




Larii) Schoepfle 



204 Sports 



BIELFELDT 
A REALITY 



COMPLEX WILL HOUSE COACHING STAFFS AND 
U OF I ATHLETIC HALL 

Story by Stephen Wu nderl ich • Layout by Pam Riley 



An already prestigious 
University of Illinois just 
became even more presti- 
gious. The Bielfeldt Athletic 
Administration Building, a state-of- 
the-art facility to support and con- 
solidate mini athletic programs, 
was being constructed in the fall of 
1995 and on its way to becoming a 
reality by early spring 1996. The 
Division of Intercollegiate Athletics 
(DIA), the building's future tenant 
and benefactor, was overseeing the 
project, which promises to have a 
very positive impact on the univer- 
sity, athletically or otherwise. 

According to the DIA's Sports 
Information Director, Mike 
Pearson, "The objectives are to get 
people under the same roof and 
become more unified in our efforts. 
This facility will feature a Hall of 
Fame exhibit area, one of the jewels 
1)11 campus in terms of attracting 
tourists." 

The main objective of Bielfeldt 
was to consolidate the coaching 
staffs of the various sports under 
one roof in order to achieve better 
unity and communication. The sec- 
ondary objective was to attract 



more tourists, and to have more stu- 
dents enroll at the U of I. The U of 
I Athletic Hall of Fame, in addition 
to the "Park of Tradition," are 
intended to be "the jewel" that 
Pearson alluded to. Director of 
Athletics, Ron Guenther. has said 
the Hall of Fame "will celebrate the 
great moments in our history and 
honor the heroes of the past." 

Pearson thought the Hall of 
Fame and Park of Tradition (which 
will have walkways and items com- 
memorating past U of I athletic 
achievements) would create a lot of 
interest and traffic, providing a 
"grand entryway to the campus 
from the south side." 

Originally slated for completion 
by September 1995, delays in con- 
struction and the shipment of raw 
materials pushed the target date up 
to the spring of 1996. Ed Sheehan, 
supervisor for P.K. Demars, the 
construction company which 
worked on Bielfeldt, said the pro- 
ject started in November of 1994, 
but "earth work delays have 
occurred because of redesigning the 
structural steel." 

According to Sheehan, the pro- 



posed structure originally was 
designed with a flat roof, but that 
proved unacceptable by U of I stan- 
dards, and "the wet spring slowed 
down installation of the foundation." 

However, he felt confident that 
the delays were worth it. "It's 
important that people see the best at 
the U of I," Hendricks said. "It will 
be a special space on campus which 
will draw people to the university." 

Not only will Bielfeldt be a major 
draw in attracting visitors to celebrate 
U of I's storied athletic traditions, but 
also pave the way for appreciation of 
all university athletic programs 
(including tennis, gymnastics and 
rugby) as it will not just focus on the 
major money-making sports like 
men's football and basketball. 

Funding for the facility came 
solely from a very generous $6 mil- 
lion donation from Gary and 
Carlotta Bielfeldt of Peoria. For 
their generosity, the Bielfeldts will 
always be remembered in the 
future, as "Bielfeldt" will rightfully 
take its place along other well- 
known and well-respected names, 
such as Foellinger and Krannert, in 
U of I's 21st Century. 



E 



I 



• 






BASEBALL 



1 By the Numbers 1 


Ul 




Opp 


8 


Texas-San Antonio 


6 


7 


Texas-San Antonio 





4 


Texas-San Antonio 


6 


2 


Texas-Pan American 


4 


2 


Miami 


4 





Miami 


16 


7 


Miami 


4 





New Mexico 


6 


2 


Alabama 


6 


11 


Texas A&M 


3 


3 


Texas A&M 


10 


3 


Alabama 


10 


4 


New Mexico 


3 





SW Texas St. 


6 


3 


Texas-San Antonio 





6 


Texas-San Antonio 


8 


5 


Eastern Illinois 


6 


3 


Eastern Illinois 


6 


1 


Purdue 


3 


8 


Southern Illinois 





2 


Western Illinois 





3 


Michigan 


1 


6 


Bradley 


4 


1 


Minnesota 


3 


4 


Notre Dame 


15 


9 


Indiana State 


3 


2 


Iowa 


2 


6 


Illinois State 


13 


5 


Illinois State 


10 


2 


Northwestern 


2 


9 


Illinois-Chicago 


1 


2 


Ohio State 


2 





Southern Illinois 


11 


8 


Chicago State 


4 


2 


Michigan State 


2 


25i/l/ins| 31 Losses 



nvia 



DID YOU KNOW...the lllini 
baseball team debuted in I87U, 

the first varsity sport at the 

university. Illinois has gone on 

to win 26 Big Ten titles, 

the second most of any 

conference school. 




THE WAIT 
IS OVER 



BASEBALL TEAM DECIDES ENOUGH IS ENOUGH, READY 
TO CLIMB INTO BIG TEN'S UPPER ECHELON 

Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Jill Kogan 



Deja vu all over again. That 
captures the essence of the 
1995 season for the Illinois 
baseball program. For the second 
year in a row, the lllini suffered a 
disappointing Southern trip. And, 
for the second year in a row. Coach 
Itch Jones' ballclub dug itself an 
inescapable hole to start conference 
play. Finally, Illinois entered the 
final weekend right in the thick of 
the Big Ten playoff race before 
being stung by a Michigan school. 
Last year it was the Wolverines, this 
year it was the Spartans' turn. 

"We were disappointed," Jones 
admitted of his squad's 25-31 
record. "This year they all basically 
had subpar years from an offensive 
standpoint." 

That the lUini's bats went silent is 
a major warning sign in itself. 
Fielding largely the same lineup that 
in the spring of 1994 averaged in 
excess of eight runs per game, 
Illinois could only muster over four 
runs per contest. Someone pulled 
the plug on the lllini offense, which 
left the yard only 33 times compared 
to 76 the year before. 

The lllini started the season 2-4 
before upsetting liic lop-rankcd 
Miami Hurricanes behind freshman 
pitcher Cody Salter. A loss to Texas- 
San Antonio left Illinois at 6-10 fol- 
lowing its Southern swing, but the 
problems were Just starting. 

Illinois' play against instate rivals 
lell something to be desired. After 



being swept in a home-and-home 
series against Eastern Illinois early 
and Illinois State late, all the lllini 
could produce was a 3-6 mark 
against neighboring opponents. 

"We felt we had a good team 
going into last year," junior pitcher 
Jason Wollard explained. "We start- 
ed off in a hole again, and that got 
our spirits down. We just didn't go 
out and get the job done, and that 
upsets us." 

The Big Ten portion started inno- 
cently for Wollard and company. 
After every weekend four-game set 
within the conference, Illinois found 
itself at .500. If the snakebitten lllini 
did not have bad luck, they would 
have had no luck. 

At 1 2- 1 2 in the Big Ten postsea- 
son race entering the final weekend 
at Michigan State, the lllini still had 
a chance to qualify for the Big Ten's 
four-team tournament for the first 
time since 1989. Illinois dropped the 
middle two contests, rendering a 
wild 22-10 rout of the Spartans 
meaningless. 

"We were high-spirited going 
into that series," Wollard remem- 
bered. 

The lllini program was hit hard 
by the graduation of standout right 
fielder Tom Sinak. inficlder Brian 
Schullian and strong pitchers Sean 
Williams anti John Ooslrcich. 

"You will always miss a Sean 
Williams because when Sean went 
to the mound, you knew he was 



going to give you seven innings and 
a complete game," Jones said. 

Wollard will assume Williams' 
duties as the staff workhorse, a 
responsibility that he has anxiously 
tackled. 

"That's the title I want, and I 
won't accept anything less," Wollard 
explained. "Being here for four 
years, I've got more experience than 
anybody. I want to lead by exam- 
ple." 

Senior southpaw Jeff Martin and 
junior righty Brian Hecht are both 
penciled into the starting rotation 
that is aiming to take a chunk out of 
last season's 5.62 staff ERA. Senior 
Matt McCully will be the stopper 
out of the bullpen. 

Once again, Jones will field one 
of the strongest double-play combi- 
nations in the Midwest in second 
baseman Brian McClure and short- 
stop Klimek. Klimek left no doubts 
concerning his return from a broken 
leg by batting a team-high .361. 
McClure. meanwhile, hopes to put 
1995 behind him despite the fact 
that he still batted a respectable .278. 
The Big Ten looks to be fairly 
w idc open this year as parity com- 
pletes its slow takeiner of the con- 
ference. 

"This year's team has the poten- 
tial lo be stronger." Jones predicted. I 
"We're not going to ha\e a lol of 
power. But teams that know how to 
win. find \\a\s to win. I'm a big 
believer in that." 






I Winning catch 

In a close play, catcher Andy 
Kortkamp applies the tag. 
The Illini will have a big 
hole to fill because of 
Kortkamp 's graduation . 

I Bird's eye view 

The batter awaits freshman 
Cody Salter's pitch. Salter 
defeated highly-ranked 
Miami earlx in the season. 



I Home run 

KeepinWtis 
head down. 
Brett Laurvick 
drives a pitch 
into the out- 
field. The des- 
ignated hitter 
will be counted 
on in a^ss 
powerful Illini 
lineup. 



Men's Baseball 



207 



-iJlt.3LJiu^^..x....am^^ X -.' - i ^ . s l) 




I Putting it in play 

Preparing to catch the pitch, 

sophomore catcher Erin 

Huber watches an opposing 

batter drive a ground ball 

toward second base. Illinois ' 

young club won its last four 

games and has reason to be 

excited entering this season. 




!ll 



20B 



Sports 



I A winning swing 

Failing to check her swing in 

time, sophomore catcher Erin 

Hiihcr (Iocs not make contuci 

with the hall. Hiihcr is one cj 

Illinois ' promising prospci ts 

that helped the team win its 

last four contests. 



W^^gS^iii(i^si^ii!i9«^j^ 



^i:>:- >••;;; 



A LITTLE OF 
EVERYTHING 



SOFTBALL CLUB EMERGES FROM WILD SEASON 
OPTIMISTIC ABOUT THE FUTURE 

Story by Andrew We i ss m a n • Layout by Amara Rozgus 



The 1995 season was an up 
and down one for the 
lUinois Softball club. Things 
tvere down after a tough-to-digest 
oss to Illinois Central College 
ICC) and a tough Parkland tourna- 
Tient, but up after sweeping the last 
"our games of the season. The team 
'inished with a 10-15 mark, but 
nissed ten games due to bad weath- 
r in the spring. 

The season started on March 21 
It Parkland where Illinois lost a 
ioubleheader. The club came right 
)ack to win two against Lake Land 
n its home opener. Illinois repeated 
tself in its next four games, getting 
wept by Lincoln Land in a two- 
;ame set and then taking two away 
rom Millikin's junior varsity. 

The erratic start for Illinois was 
;aused by the infusion of many 
/oung players into the lineup and a 
ack of experience. 

"A lot of it was pitching," coach 
lonnie Johnson said. "We didn't 
lave Carey Estell, and we were 
^oing with freshmen that were not 
ised to club ball." 

Illinois missed a total of eight 
:ames in April because of cancella- 
ions, making the team sluggish 
-vhen it could get on the field. It 
;plit the series against Springfield, 
ncluding a tough 2-1 loss that was 
lecided on a questionable call. 



On April 19, Illinois hit bottom 
as it was demolished in the debacle 
against ICC. The club then slid into 
the Parkland Tournament, where it 
struggled to go 1-4. Illinois was to 
reach a high point right after the 
low, sweeping Parkland and 
Millikin to end out the year. 

"The season went well overall," 
junior Kristin Zage said. "We had 
our ups and downs. It was nice to 
finish on a high note." 

Consistency was a problem for 
the team all year. "We struggled 
putting a complete game together 
sometimes," Zage said. 

Coach Johnson was impressed 
with the way the team came togeth- 
er and played at the end of the year. 

"It was a good finish. This was a 
good group. I liked the mix of 
freshmen with the returning play- 
ers," Johnson said. 

Team leader and club president 
Kirsten Olson was not satisfied 
with the year, but she still saw many 
bright spots. She returned to an 
mini squad this year that is rich in 
talent and experience. 

"We weren't as successful as we 
could have been," Olson said. "We 
have a lot of talent, but we lost a lot 
of close games." 

Illinois returned all of its impact 
players except Estell and infielder 
Dina Elijah. The nucleus of the 



team is strong, including upper- 
classmen infielders Deane Spike, 
Sandy Soejarto and Zage. The out- 
field is led by Olson, who ended the 
year with a .337 batting average and 
three home runs. 

"I was disappointed this year, 
first of all because there were a lot 
of close games we should have 
won," Spike said. "But now that 
we've had a whole season to play 
together, we will be more used to 
playing with each other." 

It is the freshmen from last 
year's team that could be the key 
factor in the team's success this 
year. In fact, it was the freshmen 
who were the biggest surprise addi- 
tions to the team last year, leading 
the way in pitching and hitting. Two 
freshmen led the team in hitting last 
year: Julie Huskey led the team 
with a .417 average and freshman 
Jamie Bartoli was second with a 
.386 average. In all, five freshmen 
batted above .300, including infield 
standout Janis Bolton. 

Also, freshman ace pitcher Nikki 
Czech led the staff with four wins 
and proved to be the most consis- 
tent pitcher on the staff by the end 
of the year. 

Johnson was excited about the 
prospects of the team next year. She 
believes the team will improve on 
its 10-15 mark. 




1 By the Numbers 1 


Ul 




Parkland 


Opp 

5 


9 


Parkland 


13 


7 


Lake Land 


6 


n 


Lake Land 


5 


2 


Lincoln Land 


4 


6 


Lincoln Land 


9 


12 


Millikin 


7 


12 


Millikin 


2 


6 


Lincoln Trail 


7 


3 


Lincoln Trail 


12 


2 


COD 


3 


8 


COD 


12 


1 
6 



Springfield 

Springfield 

ICC 


2 
3 
9 





ICC 


22 


5 


Parkland 


3 


7 


Belville 


12 


1 


Lincoln Trail 


2 


2 


Belville 


6 


4 


Parkland 


9 


9 


Parkland 


2 


5 


Parkland 





15 


Millikin 





6 


Millikin 


15 



10 Wins i 15 Losses 




sojtball club is trying to become 

an official member 

of the Big Ten Conference 

and gain affiliotion as 

a Division I-A sport. 



Makllig the turn 

With I / determined 
>n his face, 
irhoe pulls 
>f the pack. 
)>• distance 
(7 model of 
■ I icy for this 
year's Illini. 




I Side by side 

Making it look easy with 

his eyes closed, senior 

Matt Beary overtakes an 

Eastern Illinois opponent. 

Beary also specialized in 

the high jump. 

I In the pacli 

Trapped in traffic , junior 

Marko Koers prepares to 

holt ahead on the Armory 

track. The All-American 

hails from the 

Netherlands. 




m 


T^ 


-Carlos Miranda 




Mr] 


m 



-Carlos Miranda 



2tO 



>RTS 






BACK FOR 
MORE 



MEN'S TRACK TEAM DETERMINED TO IMPROVE ON 
EXCELLENT NATIONAL SHOWING LAST SPRING 

Story by Al i Gerokaris • Layout by Jill Kog a n 



The Illinois men's track team 
competes in two seasons- 
indoor and outdoor. And not 
only did Illinois hold its own in the 
Big Ten for both of these seasons, 
the team also added new depth as it 
showed contenders that Illinois is 
ready to compete on a national level. 

At the Big Ten Indoor 
Championships, the host Illini 
placed second in the Armory, only 
two points behind Wisconsin, 101- 
99. Illinois' first-place perfor- 
mances included Dorian Green's 
400-meter dash time of 46.52 sec- 
onds, Marko Koers 800-meter run 
time of 1:50.41, shot putter Jeff 
Teach's toss of 62 feet, I inch and 
the 4x1 00-meter relay team of 
Green, Tyrone Williams, Matt 
Klima and Ben Beyers' winning 
time of 3:13.22. 

Illinois placed fourth nationally 
with strong contributing perfor- 
mances from Green in the 400- 
meter dash (46.47), Koers in the 800 
(1:50.29), Danen McDonough in 
the pole vault (18' 1/2"), Teach in 
the shot (59' 3/4") and the distance 
medley of Eric Henson, Green, 
Chris Saunders and Koers (9:36.33). 

Every Illini who competed in the 
NCAA Indoor Championships was 
awarded All-American honors. 

'i think everything basically 
went well," head coach Gary 
Wieneke said. "We challenged for 



the indoor title, and we were fourth 
in the nation. That's not a vote." 

Sophomore distance runner 
BaiTy Pearman agreed that the Illini 
stayed to their task last spring. 

"Overall, last year went really 
well," Pearman said. "We did great 
in the small meets, had great times 
and had guys qualify early for the 
nationals so they could concentrate 
on winning meets and racing fast." 

The same team that claimed 
fourth in the indoor championships 
is returning minus shot putter Teach, 
who graduated. For the 1996 out- 
door season, Koers, Saunders, Eric 
Henson and Karl Meyers will be 
returning to contribute to the team. 

"That's quite a load right there," 
Wieneke said. "That makes our 
outdoor team significantly more 
difficult than our indoor team will 
be. We're really optimistic about 
outdoor Big Tens and nationals." 

Returning to this year's squad is 
senior discus thrower Kyle Taylor. 
Taylor threw tough in the spring, 
earning a first-place finish at a 
home meet included in Illinois' 
Spring Sports Festival among other 
accomplishments. 

"My goals were to place in the 
top three at the Big Tens, to go to 
nationals and to become an AU- 
American," Taylor said. "I had a 
really rough day at the Big Tens, but 
I did go to nationals and become an 



All-American as a junior. So I was 
pretty excited about that. It was a 
really big year for me." 

Taylor looked to improve his 
tosses this year. With a little reeval- 
uation, Taylor knew it was his focus 
that needed conditioning. 

"I just need to start working on 
the mental side of my game," 
Taylor said. "You have to be very 
focused, and I'm getting better each 
year. I look for another big year this 
year. I hope to be consistent and 
have some big throws." 

Taylor said that without the guidance 
of field events coach John Baumann and 
Wieneke, he could not have accom- 
plished what he set out to do. 

"John has been great," Taylor 
said. "Since coming on three years 
ago, I've learned a lot and become a 
better thrower. Coach Wieneke is 
always an inspiration. He's a great 
coach and motivator." 

Peaiman agrees that, similar to 
sprint coach Willie Williams and 
Baumann, Wieneke's coaching offers 
more than just advice on running. 

"Coach Wieneke is as influential 
as ever," Pearman said. "He's a big 
part of our training. We look to him 
for training schedules as well as for 
what to do during the races. I'd say 
that for everything I did personally 
and everything the team did as a 
whole. Coach Wieneke is 95% 
responsible." 




I By the Numbers I 



ui 

1st 

1st 

1st 

2nd 

1st 

2nd 



Illinois Invitational 

Southern Illinois 

Purdue Triangular 

Illinois Quadrangular 

Illinois Triangular 

Big Ten Indoor 

Championships 

4th NCAA Indoor 

Championships 

6th Alabama Relays 

1st Illinois Quadrangular 

3rd Gatorade Track Classic 

3rd Big Ten Outdoor 

Championships 

41st NCAA"Outdoor 

Championships 



Season Schedule 




rivia 



DID YOU KNOW...niinois 
coachWillie Williams broke Jesse 
Owens ' world record in the 100- 
meter dash with a time of 10.1 
seconds, a mark that stood 
untouched for years. 





Ml 



1 By the Numbers 1 


Ul 




1st 


Illinois Quadrangular 


2nd 


Rocky Mountain Cup 


4th 


Purdue Invitational 


1st 


Illinois Quadrangular 


1st 


Illinois Triangular 


1st 


Big Ten Indoor 




Championships 


24th 


NCAA Indoor 




Channpionships 


■2nd 


Western Illinois Invite 


1st 


Rice Quadrangular 


3rd 


BYU Invitational 


1st 


Big Ten Outdoor 




Championships 


4th 


NCAA Outdoor 




Championships 


Season Schedule 



nvia 



IDJD YOU KNOW... former 

legend and current 

\U.S. Olympian Tonja Bur/ord reg-\ 

istered the world's fastest time in 

the 400'meter iiurdles 

last ye^ 



111!! 



MAL 



DREAM 
SEASON 



WOMEN'S TRACK ACCOMPLISHES GOALS, CLAIMS TWO 
BIG TEN CROWNS AND FOURTH PLACE NATIONALLY 

Story by Dan Ryan • Layout by Amara Rozgus 



'niL&mr-sl'i 



The women's track program 
is home to some of the most 
dedicated and disciplined 
athletes on campus. To compete at a 
nationally elite level. Coach Gary 
Winckler's program stresses the 
complete package, encompassing 
everything from nutrition to train- 
ing to mental attitude. 

This would explain why Illinois 
used last season as an opportunity to 
cement its standing as the premier 
women's track outfit in the 
Midwest. The Illini ran away with 
both the indoor and outdoor Big Ten 
Championships before recording the 
highest finish nationally in Illinois' 
history - fourth at the NCAA 
Outdoor Championships. 

The Illini began the indoor sea- 
son with a deceptively unimpres- 
sive start — deceptive because their 
lower standings in meets were due 
to Winckler's strategy of fielding 
split squads. This maximized 
Illinois' NCAA qualifiers and 
exposed them to some of the more 
pre,stigious events in the nation. 

Illinois hosted one of its own 
when it welcomed traditional pow- 
ers Arkansas, Clemson, Nebraska 
and Wisconsin to the Armory in 
January. Led by AU-American 
Tonya Williams, the illini provided 
an early hint ot things to come by 
dominating the meet. 

Illinois regained Ihc Big Ten 
indoor title in surprisingly easy 



fashion. The Illini routed host and 
defending champion Michigan 
thanks to an impressive effort from 
the meet's MVP, multidimensional 
senior Carmel Corbett. 

"I had no idea we would win by 
that margin," Winckler said. "But 
we knew that if we came in, things 
went our way and we did what we 
were capable of, we could win the 
meet." 

For Williams, the victory was 
especially sweet considering the 
circumstances. 

"I feel great because we kicked 
Michigan's butt on their home 
track," Williams said at Ann Arbor. 
"The revenge is just a feeling you 
can't explain." 

Among Illinois' impressive out- 
door triumphs in the regular season 
was at the Rice Quadrangular with 
stiff competition in the form of 
Rice, Arkansas and Miami. The 
Illini also travelled to the presti- 
gious Penn Relays and returned 
with two titles. 

The Illini won the Big Ten 
Outdoor Championships in an 
equally impressive fashion. 
Winckler's squad breezed to a 51- 
point victory over Wisconsin on the 
strength of eight titles. 

"As a senior, this is the best thing 
that you could ask for," the All- 
American Williams said. "To win 
the Big Ten championship in my last 
outdoor mcci is unbelievable." 



Illinois really made this a year to 
remember when the squad travelled 
to Tennessee for the NCAA meet. 
Williams' national title in the 400- 
meter hurdles sparked the Illini to a 
fourth-place showing behind LSU, 
UCLA and only 1 .5 points short of 
Georgia. 

All-American honors were 
bestowed upon Aspen Burkett, 
Corbett, Collinus Newsome, Dawn 
Riley, Hope Sanders, Tama 
Tochihara, high jumper Nora Weber, 
Williams and the 4x1 00- meter relay 
team. Corbett also earned the exclu- 
sive Big Ten Medal of Honor and 
second-team Academic All- 
American honors for her accom- 
plishments in the classroom. 

So the question remains: what 
can this year's Illini possibly do for 
an encore? 

"A lot of people are really more 
focused," Williams said. "Everyone 
has the same mindset and knows 
what we have to do to get what we 
want out of the .season." 

"I don't put anyone ahead of us. 
The national championship is defi- 
nitely on our minds, believe me. I 
won an individual title last year, but 
I would really love a team title," 
said Willaims. 

Coming from the emotional 
leader of a team with determination 
and tunnel vision, that translates 
into bad news for the rest of the 
nation. 




I Up and over 

Warming up for a rac\ 

home meet last sprin 

Carmel Corbett clear^KMast 

hurdle. The All-Amer. 

from New Zealand caWked an 

outstanding Illinois corner. 



I Tunnel vision 

Bearing down on the finii 
distance specialist Brooke 
Sicougsky heads into the 
stretch. Sicougsky also col 
trihuted to the cross-counWs team 
in the fall. 



-Andrew Ryback 



Women's TRi 



213 



i'^A 



'k' 



-Sy^j 



:5--V 



^ 



l>-^ 



^' 






I Si/i^eet spot 

//i a home mutch at Atkins 

Tennis Center^ junior Chris 

Devore returns a volley with 

a two-hafided backhand. 

Devore has b^n a force for 

Illinois sin^f transferring 

from Sd^uth Carolina. 



I Cooling down 

After a hard-fought point, 

junior Chris Devore catches 

his breath. 



N 




2 1 1 



SPORTS 



D.iilylllinililcl'holo 

Power ball 

Following through on his 

serve, Jerry Turek prepares 

to attack the net. Turek is a 

product of Ciuuula. 



-Daily lllini File Photo 




Pjily lllMlihU'Pli,-!. 



BIGGER AND 
BETTER 



MEN'S TENNIS TEAM DRIVING TOWARDS BIG TEN 
TITLE, NATIONAL RECOGNITION 

Story by Garen Va rta n i a n • Layout by Jill Kogan 



On the heels of one of the 
most successful seasons in 
the history of the Illinois 
men's tennis program, expectations 
were high for bigger and better 
things in 1995-96. 

The mini compiled an 18-10 
mark last season, including a 6-4 
record in the Big Ten, good for 
fourth place. Both victory totals 
were the highest for the Illini in nine 
years. The squad also finished 6-6 
against ranked opponents and 
Illinois' final national ranking of No. 
43 was the highest in 1 1 seasons. 

"We had a very good spring," 
Illinois head coach Tiley said. "It was 
definitely a very successful season." 

Tiley, who began his third year 
of coaching at Illinois, added that 
the team actually could have fin- 
ished higher in the conference. 

"We really had an opportunity to 
finish third in the conference," 
Tiley explained. "We lost a tough 
match to Northwestern and then 
{finished behind them in the league." 

At the Big Ten Championships, 
ithe team finished 1-2, placing 
I Illinois seventh overall. Because the 
I Illini remained largely intact with 
several returnees, however, the 
players fully expected to climb the 
iBig Ten ladder. 

"This year, more than in any of 
imy years on the team, we really feel 

I we can win the Big Ten," redshirt 

i. 

Ijunior David Manpearl said before 

Ithe season. "We have all the pieces 



and everyone wants it. We have the 
team to win the Big Ten." 

Illinois returned the core of its 
lineup, including the top three play- 
ers from last year. Senior Jeremy 
Sutter, who played No. 1 for the Illini 
last spring, was back. He earned All- 
Big Ten honors in finishing as one of 
the top five players in the conference. 

Tiley also singled out Manpearl, 
who set an Illinois men's tennis record 
last season for singles wins with 30. 
Manpearl also went undefeated in 
March en route to garnering the Big 
Ten Player of the Month award. 

Another player who Tiley cited 
was No. 2 singles player Jerry Turek, 
who reached the semifinals at the 
Big Ten Championships before bow- 
ing out. Brady Blain, who finished 
.strong by going 13-4 over the last 
two months of the season, also 
shouldered a load for the Illini. 

"Each of these players-and 
everyone on the team-improved 
their games over the summer," 
Tiley noted. "And we should be 
twice as strong as we were last 
year." 

In addition to Illinois' veterans, 
Tiley managed to land three touted 
recruits. Gavin Sontag was the No. 1 
player out of Ohio and finished in the 
top 50 of the United States. Jakub 
Teply, a product of Monroesville, Pa., 
finished 30th nationally and pmlic- 
ipated in the U.S. Olympic Festival. 
The final recruit, Oliver Freelove, was 
the No. 3 player in England last year. 



"The freshmen should have a big 
impact on the team," Sutter predict- 
ed. "All of the freshmen can play in 
the lineup and will challenge and 
push the people already in the lineup. 
Also, they will provide us with depth. 
If people start getting sick or hurt, 
they will be able to step right in." 

According to Tiley, last season 
was no different than years past in 
that Michigan, Minnesota and 
Northwestern were once again 
Illinois" toughest competition in the 
Big Ten. He added, however, that 
the Illini are strong enough to beat 
any team in the conference. 

That is good because things do 
not get any easier for Tiley's troops. 
They are slated to collide with more 
than their share of ranked opponents. 
After facing 12 nationally-ranked 
non-conference foes last season, this 
year's schedule includes 17 ranked 
opponents, including dates with 
Notre Dame. Pepperdine and 
Southern California. 

Illinois was also fortunate 
enough to be invited to the elite 
Corpus Christi Classic in Texas. 
The Classic field annually features 
the top 16 teams in the nation. 

Tiley went so far as to say that this 
was the toughest schedule for Illinois 
ever. At the same time, all of the ele- 
ments are in place for a landmark season. 
"First, we must have the ability to exe- 
cute and work hard," Tiley said. "And 
we must also continue to have a winning 
attitude on a daily basis 




TENNIS 



1 By the Numbers 1 


Ul 

5 


Opp 

Florida IntI 2 


1 


Minnesota 


6 


5 
6 


Miami(OH) 
Cincinnati 


2 

1 


7 


Illinois State 





2 


Arizona State 


5 


4 


Arizona 


3 





Notre Dame 


7 


6 
2 
4 


Pennsylvania 

Pacific 
Wichita State 


1 

4 
3 


6 


Hav\/aii 


1 


6 

4 


Chaminade 
Texas-El Paso 


1 
3 


7 


Weber State 





3 


Ball State 


4 


4 


Iowa 


3 


5 


Michigan State 


2 


1 
4 


Michigan 
Ohio State 


6 
3 


2 


Indiana 


5 


4 
3 


Wisconsin 
Northwestern 


3 
4 


6 


Purdue 


1 


4 


Penn State 


3 



3 


Michigan State 
Penn State 


4 
4 


4 


Ohio State 


2 


18 Wins M 10 Losses 




rivia 



DID YOU KNOW...Mark Long 

holds the Illinois career records 

for both singles victories(103) and\ 

doubles wins(86). Long has also 

a two-time All-Big Ten selection 

his Illini career. 




llini careen I 



■WiiiilHiMM 



mm 










I Eyes on the ball 

Eyes intent on the ball, 

senior Sara Marshack winds 

up for a backhand return. 

Marshack went from walking 

on to a valuable contributor 

for Illinois. 

I Perfect form 

Unleashing a forehand 

return, senior Kristen Jones 

balances on one foot. Jones 

teamed with C ami lie 

Baldrich to form one of the 

most lethal doubles teams in 

the nation. 




-Joel Hrnnich 



»RTS 



GETTING 
BACK UP 



WOMEN'S TENNIS SQUAD HOPES TO RECOVER FROM 
BRIEF DIP IN CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT 

Story by Steve Hanf • Layout by Jill Kogan 



Coach Jennifer Roberts 
headed into the 1995 
women's tennis season 
with a squad full of promise. She 
had a savvy group of veterans 
infused with a core of young talent, 
a nationally-ranked doubles team 
and her squad was hosting the 1995 
Big Ten Championships in May. All 
signs pointed to a breakthrough 
year for Illinois women's tennis. 

But the fourth-seeded tourna- 
ment host had a tough weekend, 
losing its first match to Purdue to 
fall into the loser's bracket. Illinois 
managed to win only one match 
over the championship weekend — 
against No. 8 Minnesota — before 
falling to Michigan to take sixth 
place for the season. 

"Looking at the finish last year, 
you could say that we took steps 
backward," said Roberts. 

Roberts inherited a .500 program 
when she took over the head coach- 
ing position in 1987. There was 
only one thing Roberts could hope 
to do. 

"When I first came to Illinois, 
the plan was to establish our pro- 
gram as a Big Ten power and 
advance on the national level," 
Roberts said. "We moved in that 
direction every year and we're con- 
fident that we can be contenders 
every year." 

As Illinois improved every year, 
so did the rest of the teams in the 



conference. The lllini were able to 
break through and establish them- 
selves as an upper-division team 
this decade, finishing as high as 
third in the conference in 1993. 
Illinois' 14-10 record in 1995 was 
good, but not good enough. The 
lllini could not secure their first 
conference championship. 

"We had a really good season, 
but one bad match (first round vs. 
Purdue) and that affects the results 
of the whole year," Roberts said. 
"Unfortunately, we didn't get it 
done in the championship. It was 
disappointing, but we just have to 
move on, move forward." 

Moving on could prove difficult 
with the seniors Illinois lost. 
Kristen Jones and Camille Baldrich 
were All-Big Ten selections last 
season and were the co-MVPs for 
the lllini. Baldrich and Jones, who 
were also All-Big Ten in 1 994, both 
played well at the top singles spots, 
but the twosome excelled as the No. 
1 doubles team for the lllini. 

Coach Roberts calls upon an 
experienced group of juniors and a 
young group of recruits to pick up 
where Illinois left off and take the 
program to the next level. 

"We have a new group of fresh- 
men here, a group that will help get 
the job done," Roberts said. "I think 
they can win the championship 
instead of just being competitive." 

Leading this new group of lllini 



will be juniors Jessica Klapper and 
Susanne Land. Klapper won the 
Most Improved Player award for the 
lllini in 1995. going 19-15 overall. 

Land felt she struggled a bit at 
No. 3 singles in a "sophomore 
slump" last season, but showed 
signs of coming out of it toward the 
end of the season. Both are ready 
for the challenge of the coming sea- 
son. 

"I'm excited about the new lead- 
ership role," said Klapper. "This is 
pretty much a new team and we're 
ready to step up now that the 
seniors are gone." 

"Jess and I got a lot of confi- 
dence when we were underclass- 
men from the seniors," said Land. 
"We looked up to them, and the 
freshmen now need to know that 
they're just as good as we are. We 
need to put that confidence in them 
to know that we can beat good 
teams." 

Klapper thinks this season will 
be all about challenges. With key 
players graduated, key players hurt 
and a whole new cast of characters, 
Klapper does not see many freebies 
out there. 

"We have a lot of depth this year, 
and we're going to have to use it to 
fight for every point, every inatch," 
Klapper said. "We don't have that 
one great player or that one great 
doubles team anymore to bail us 
out." 



TENNL 



1 By the Numbers 1 


Ul 




Opp 


3 


Oklahoma 


6 


1 


South Alabama 


8 


9 


Penn State 





9 


Drake 





9 


Chaminade 





6 


Boston College 





8 


Hawaii-Pacific 





8 


Hawaii 


1 


8 


Fresno State 


1 


1 


San Diego 


8 


4 


Pacific 


5 


2 


Indiana 


7 


6 


Ohio State 


3 


1 


Notre Dame 


8 


6 


Purdue 


3 


5 


Minnesota 


4 


6 


Iowa 


3 


3 


Michigan 


6 


7 


Michigan State 


2 


3 


Northwestern 


6 


8 


Wisconsin 


1 


1 


Purdue 


5 


5 


Minnesota 


1 





Michigan 


5 


14 Wins 1 24 Losses 



nvia 



DID YOU KNOW...assistant 

coach Lindsey Nimmo ended her 

career with a hang, winning 

AH-American, Academic 

All-American, Big Ten Player 

of the Year, Big Ten Medal 

of Honor, All-Big Ten, Academic 

All-Big Ten and Illinois MVP 

honors in 1993. 



OMEN'S TENNIS 217 




GOLF 



I By the Numbers I 



Falcon-Cross Creek 

Northern Intercollegiate 

Nike/Northwest Classic 

Florida Invitational 

mperial Lakes Classic 

Seminole Classic 

Tanglewood Invite 

Marshall Invitational 

Kepler Invitational 

Kent Invitational 

Big Ten Championships 




rivia 



DID YOU KNOW...Steve 
Strieker captured medalist 

honors at the lii)> Tin 

Championships an amazing 

three times. Strieker is now 

\a hot prospeet on the I'rofessional 



Sports 



PUTTING IT 
TOGETHER 



MEN'S GOLF WARMS UP WITH WEATHER BEFORE 
TAPERING OFF AT CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT 

Story by Lance Johnson • Layout by Amara Rozgus 



The 1994-1995 Illinois men's 
golf team was marred by 
inconsistency on the greens. 
Illinois participated in four tourna- 
ments in the fall portion of last 
year's schedule. 

The mini began at the Falcon- 
Cross Creek Championship, where 
Coach Ed Beard's squad took fifth 
in a 24-team field. Senior Dave 
Cable led the way with a three-day 
total of 223, good for ninth place 
individually. 

Illinois did not fare quite as well 
two weeks later at the prestigious 
Northern Intercollegiate hosted by 
Big Ten rival Michigan State. It was 
fellow senior Ryan Graff's turn to 
pace Illinois to a ninth-place finish 
by firing two rounds of 72-73 for an 
impressive 145 total, which earned 
Graff fourth place. 

After Beard's team performed 
respectably at the Nike/Northwest 
Classic hosted by Oregon State, the 
mini hit the road again for their fall 
finale at the PGA Florida Atlantic 
Invitational over Halloween. The 
team also ended the fall season on a 
high note, claiming fourth out of 15 
teams. 

Unfortunately for the llliiii. it 
look them a while to warm up once 
ihc spring season began. 

Illinois lelurned to the Sunshine 
Slale lor ihc Seminole Classic iiosl- 
cd by I'lorida Slale. Beard's team 
iinproveci with a sevenlh-place per- 
lormance with an KXX total. The 



improved total could be attributed 
to Atkinson, Cable and Scott all 
ending in the top 22. 

The mini followed their 
Seminole performance by taking 
seventh once again at the Dr. 
Pepper/Tanglewood Invitational in 
Texas. Illinois came in at the mid- 
dle of the field, finishing 10th. 

Illinois rebounded the next meet 
when it traveled to perennial con- 
ference power Ohio State. The 915 
final total was deceiving because 
the mini were maneuvering around 
a difficult Scarlet Course layout. 

In their final spring tuneup for 
the Big Ten Championships, Illinois 
took fifth in the Kent Invitational. 
Scott finished seventh individually 
as the mini prepared to head to 
Wisconsin for the conference tour- 
nament. 

Once in Madi,son, Illinois ended 
up taking fifth after two consecu- 
tive middle rounds of 309 took 
Beard's team out of contention. 
Ohio State claimed the Big Ten 
throne once again. Scott took eighth 
individually with a 298 total. 
Atkinson and Cable finished in a tie 
for 20th. 

"All of the kids played really 
well," Beard stated. "But the sec- 
ond round really killed us. It wasn't 
great, but it was our best." 

"Wc were conlident thai \\c 
would finish in tlic lo|i three." 
(iindler said. "We had bail rouiuls 
that we couldn't rebound from to 



come back." 

Illinois will be without the senior 
core of its team, with the exception 
of experienced returnees Atkinson, 
Graff and junior Matt Gindler. 

"We lost a lot of experience," 
Ryan Graff stated. "We had five 
good players who were productive 
last year." 

But with a new outlook for this 
season, the Illini golfers believe 
they will contend for regionals. 

"We had a lot of older guys with 
tourney experience," newcomer 
Atkinson said. "We just did not put 
together some consistent tourna- 
ments. I am putting pressure on 
myself to do well this year, too." 

The acquisition of Toronto 
native and freshman Matt 
Henderson will add much-needed 
depth to the Illini lineup this year. 
Henderson has already shown the 
potential to step in and contribute 
immediately at the collegiate 
level. 

"He is a real solid player with a 
great putting stroke," Graff said. 
"He is a player who is confident in 
himself." 

If Illinois can maintain a level of 
play throughout the 1995-96 sea- 
son, Beard expects to see improve- 
ment across the board. 

"We want to definitely work 
lianl and slay ci>nsistenl on a higher 
level." Beard said of the team's 
wish list. "We need to he mentally 
and physically ready to play belter," 



i*;¥SNs 




I Great follow through 

Sophomore Matt Gindler follows through on 
a difficult putt. Gindler will he expected to 
carry a heavier load this season. 




Putting from the fringe, senior c^^Bp- 
tain Jay Scott watches the hall. Scott fin- 
ished eighth at the Big Ten 
Championships. 



I Deep concentration 

In a round at the Orange Coursl^^^ior 
Dave Cable rolls a putt toward ^f\hole. 
Cable teamed with Jay Scott to form a 
solid senior core for the Illini. 




-Sports Information 



Men's G 




219 




ym 



ILifg 


ng it up 


Illini I 


cky Biehl 


sean 


esfor the 


line ai 


speed of 


an Ora 


e Course 


green. I 


'hi ended 


he 


'ollegiate 


career 


th a run- 


ner-up 


lowing at 




? Big Ten 


Chat 


ionships. 




I Draino 

Settled into a crouch, sopho- 
more Jacqueline Rubin gets 

the best vantage point of her 
next putt's break. Rubin will 

look to improve on her aver- 
age of 84 strokes per round 
last season. 

I Good roll 

Following the line of her 

putt, sophomore Jacqueline 

Rubin lags the hall to the 

hole. Rubin will be one of 

Illinois' veteran leaders this 

season. 




► RTS 



ONE LAST 
HURDLE 



WOMEN'S GOLF TEAM SETS SIGHTS ON BIG TEN TITLE, 
NCAA BERTH AFTER LAST SEASON'S SNUB 

Story by Dave B I u m be rg • Layout by Jill Kogan 



For most women's collegiate 
golf teams, placing in the top 
five in seven of the ten tour- 
naments you played in would be 
viewed as a successful season. Not 
if you're Illinois. 

Once again, Illinois was snubbed 
of an NCAA berth when the com- 
mittee chose Minnesota as the 
fourth and final team from the 
Midwest to advance to regional 
play and have an opportunity to 
play in the NCAA Championships. 

It marked the third year in a row 
that the Illini were the odd team out. 

"We were knocking at the door, 
but it just didn't open all the way 
for us," Illinois head coach Paula 
Smith said. 

What made the situation even 
fiarder to figure was that Illinois 
went on to beat Minnesota by 17 
ihots in the Big Ten 
[Championships. The Illini shot a 
'our-round total of 1,277 to finish 
bird in the conference. While it 
A'as a good showing. Smith was not 
hrilled with that outcome, either. 

"The last four years, I really felt 
ve had a chance to win the Big 
Pen," Smith said. "And this year 
specially, I really thought this was 
he year for that." 

Excluding the NCAA mi.shap, 
llinois had a stellar season. In the 
irst tournament of the season, the 
Mini found the star of the future in 
iCaren Karmazin. In her debut, the 
'reshman fired a three-round score 



of 224 to tie for first in the Illinois 
State Redbird Classic. 

Though she lost in the playoff, 
the Illinois team beat its nearest 
competitor in the field of 18 by 19 
strokes. Karmazin proved to be a 
valuable member of the Illini 
throughout the season, averaging 
79. 1 1 strokes per round. 

"I thought I did really well," 
Karmazin said. "My goal for the 
season was to finish in the top 10 at 
Big Ten's, and I finished ninth. So I 
think I had a pretty good year." 

Karmazin also had the second 
lowest round for an Illini when she 
shot a 73 in three different tourna- 
ments. The Illini with the best 
round of the year was incomparable 
co-MVP Becky Biehl. 

Four-time All-Big Ten selection 
Biehl averaged 77.26 shots for the 
season to lead the team. The team 
captain was also Illinois' leading 
scorer in seven of the 10 tourneys, 
including two first-place triumphs. 
Biehl also lead Illinois in the con- 
ference championships with a four- 
round total of 304, good for second 
place. 

The senior was also superior 
with her studies. Biehl joined team- 
mates Christine Garrett, Kourtney 
Mulcahy and Kristie Treseler as 
Academic All-Big Ten performers. 
For Biehl, it marked her fourth 
selection to the squad. And with the 
absence of three contributing 
seniors. Smith now must fill a big 



void in the lineup. But she feels it 
may not be as bad as it looks. 

"We have coming back three 
players who could potentially shoot 
in the low 70s-Karmazin, Jacqueline 
Rubin and Ashley Webb," Smith 
said. "I think the exciting thing is 
everybody has the opportunity to be 
a part of the team." 

Although Webb was playing in 
her first year, she was not particu- 
larly fond of her play. 

"I was disappointed with my 
game," Webb said. "But as a team 
we did all right. Our ultimate goal 
was to win the Big Ten. but we fin- 
ished third. We weren't disappointed 
because that's a pretty good finish." 

One reason why Illinois has 
placed so well recently at the Big 
Ten's may be due to their tough 
schedule throughout the season. But 
the Illini schedule has not gotten 
them that elusive Big Ten crown 
they've come so close to winning 
the last four years. 

"I would rate our schedule with 
anyone's in the country," Smith 
said. "With regionals, you try to 
play as much as you can in your 
region, but we have a very good 
mix of tournaments." 

Illinois will do everything they 
can to prevent themselves from 
plunging. With returnees from last 
year's team such as Karmazin, 
Rubin and Webb, they are talented 
and peeved at being passed up by 
the NCAA. 



1 By the Numbers 1 


Ul 




2ncl 


Snowbird Invitational 


6nd 


Wahine Invitational 


2nd 


Boilermaker 




Invitational 


7th 


Liz Murphey Classic 


1st 


Illini Classic 


3th 


Big Ten 




Championships 


Season Schedule 




(enee Heiken 



( '93) and Lia Biehl ( '91) both 
I forned their playing cards for the 

Ladies Professional Golf 

\Association (LPGA) Tour last fall \ 

at the qualifying school in 



t'm^'V-- 



sports 



Celebrating 100 Years of Big Ten Heritage 

Illinois' athletic tradition is second to none. Case in point: 
Memorial Stadium's staid columns can barely contain the history 
that has been played out since its dedication over 70 years ago. 

George Halas, Coach Bob Zuppke, Red Grange, Coach Ray 
Eliot, Alex Agase, Dike Eddleman, Johnny Karras, Al Brosky, Ed 
O'Bradovich, Bobby Mitchell, Ray Nitschke, J.C. Caroline, Dick 
Butkus, Jim Grabowski, Doug Dieken, Scott Studwell, Dave 
Wilson, Tony Eason, Mike Bass, Don Thorp, JackTrudeau, 
David Williams, Scott Davis, Darrick Brownlow, Moe Gardner, 
Jeff George, Dana Howard, Kevin Hardy and Simeon Rice - the 
list is seemingly infinite. One would be remiss to forget the tradi- 
tions of the cheerleaders, Chief lUiniwek, Dad's Day, 
Homecoming and the Marching Illini that were born right here 
in Champaign. 

Illinois' athletic program has had its share of famous coaches as 
well. In fact, many living legends stroll the campus today, guiding 
the Illini to powerhouse status in some cases. Lou Henson (men's 
basketball), Theresa Grentz (women's basketball), Gary Wieneke 
(men's cross country, track & field), Gary Winckler (women's 
cross country, track & field), Yoshi Hayasaki (gymnastics), Craig 
Tiley (men's tennis) and Mark Johnson (wrestling) can all boast 
of elite credentials and are respected as one of the top coaches in 
their profession. Perhaps most important though, the university is 
simply a special place because of them. 

The Orange and Blue undoubtedly represent the best that the 
Big Ten Conference has to offer. No other university has integrat- 
ed top-notch athletics and academics better than Illinois. That is 
precisely the reason why the following pages only manage to 
scratch the surface of a century of Illini excellence in the Big Ten. 




222 



Sports 



The Evolution of the Big Ten Conference 




The Big Ten has come a long way since that fateful 
afternoon on Jan. 11, 1895, when seven university 
presidents gathered at the Palmer House, a Chicago 
hotel. The seven decided to separate their respective 
institutions from the widespread cheating that had 
darkened collegiate athletics since their very incep- 
tion. Thus, the formation of the Intercollegiate 
Conference of Faculty Representatives, still the offi- 
cial name of the conference, was underway. 

The pioneer members of the Western Conference 
were Chicago, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Northwestern, Purdue and Wisconsin. Indiana and 
Iowa joined the ranks shortly thereafter in 1899, and 
Ohio State was welcomed in 1912, pushing the 
number of member institutions to ten. After enjoy- 
ing initial athletic success in the conference, high- 
lighted by legendary Chicago coach Amos Alonzo 
Stagg's football teams, the Maroons left the Western 
Conference in 1946, citing an inability to field com- 
petitive teams. Three years later, Michigan State 
replaced Chicago as the 10th university. 

And so the Big Ten remained until the conference's 
presidents voted to add Penn State. The Nittany 
Lions began competing in the Big Ten four years ago 
and successfully represented the Big Ten in the 1995 
Rose Bowl. 

1975 marked the first year that the Big Ten spon- 
sored conference championships for women's athlet- 
ics. In the illustrious 100-year existence of the coun- 
try's premier conference, Illinois has claimed more 
Big Ten championships than any other university 
with the exception of Michigan. 




Big Ten 



223 



II 



The 1920s 



No compilation of Illinois' athletic history 
is complete without documenting the pio- 
neering accomplishments of legendary 
running back Harold "Red" Grange. The 
Wheaton native, arguably the most 
famous Illini athlete ever, enjoyed the 
most famous game in Illini annals as well. 
On a fall afternoon in 1924, when the 
headline was supposed to be the official 
dedication of Memorial Stadium, the 
Galloping Ghost took his first four hand- 
offs for touchdown runs of 95, 67, 56 and 
44 yards through the Michigan defense. In 
limited duty, Grange burned the 
Wolverines for six touchdowns and 
accounted for more than 400 5^ards of 
offense in Illinois' 39-14 rout of Michigan. 

Grange was not the only football 
legend to gain immortality amorig 
Illinois' followers in the 1920s J 
Coach Bob Zuppke's 29 year 
career, wliich spanned from 1 
1941, included Illinois' four 
national titlists (1914-19-23-27) 
Through experimentation, Zup 
largely credited with inventing 
football's huddle, screen pass 
flea flicker. The Memorial Stadium 
playing surface was rededicated 
in 1966 as Zuppke Field in appre- 
ciation of Illinois' most legendaiy 
coach. 









The 1930s 



Rarely will you come across an ath- 
lete as efficient as Illinois gymnast 
Joe Giallombardo. Giallombardo 
won three NCAA all-around titles, 
seven NCAA titles overall and three 
Big Ten all-around titles in his 
three year stint as an Illini. The All- 
American's contributions spurred 
coach Hartley Price's 1939 squad to 
the program's first national team 
title. 




The 1940s 




. uctly ^^■as the namesake 
.' Athlete of the Year 
■r Dike Eddleman was a jack 
uades- as evidenced by his 
lettering in sports an unprecedent- 
ed 1 1 times- and a master of them 
all, too. The three-sport star 
excelled as a leading member of 
Illinois' 1947 Rose Bowl victors, led 
the 1949 Final Four basketball 
squad in scoring, won the Big Ten 
Medal of Honor and was the silver 
medalist in the high jump at the 

The gloiy years of Illinois basket- 
ball occurred in one memorable 
stretch in the 1940s when the Whiz 
Kids ruled the Big Ten. Only World 
War II prevented this remarkable 
fivesome from winning what would 
be Illinois' only national title in 
1943. Coached by Doug Mills and 
led by Andy Philip, the Kids went 
17-1 that year, including a perfect 
12-0 against conference opponents 
before being called to serve their 
countiy overseas. 






Sports 



II 




The 1950s 




The gymnastics program at 
Illinois flourished under the 
direction of coach Charlie 
Pond throughout the 1950s. 
Pond's Illini put together a 
remarkable string of 11 straight 
Big Ten titles and squeezed 
two NCAA crowns into the run 
in 1955 and 1956. Among 
Pond's standouts during the 
decade of Illinois dominance 
was Abie Grossfield. Grossfield 
won seven Big Ten titles, a 
national title, a Big Ten Medal 
of Honor and was an 
Olympian and Olympic coach 
for the United States. 



The golden age of Illinois ath 
letics, 1950-54, saw the Illini 
bring home nearly half of the 
Big Ten championships avail- 
able. One of the highlights of 
this prosperous era was leg- 
endary coach Ray Eliot's 1951 
football team, the last Illinois 
squad to go undefeated. The 
Illini used 34 unanswered 
points in the second half to 
destroy Stanford in the Rose 
Bowl, 40-7. 






The 1960s 






Two Illini legends led coach 
Pete Elliott's 1963 football team 
to the school's last Rose Bc:)wl 
victoiy, a 17-7 triumph over 
PAC-10 representative 
Washington on New Year's Day 
of 1964. Linebacker Dick Butkus, 
one of the top defensive players 
in the history of the game, and 
running back Jim Grabowski, 
who garnered MVP honors in 
the win over the Huskies, 
remain synonymous with hard- 
nosed Illinois football tradition 
to this day. 



One of the most successful 
coaches in Illinois histoiy, 
Leo Johnson, led his track 
teams to 18 Big Ten champi 
onships and three NCAA 
titles in his 28 year tenure. 
That impressive total places 
him second among Illinois 
coaches. Johnson, who 
stepped down in 1965, also 
guided his Illini to an 
unprecedented 12 indoor 
and outdoor conference 
crowns in a 10 year run. 









SPorjTs 




The 1970s 




Basketball standout Eddie Johnson 
joined coach Lou Henson in bring- 
ing the Illinois program all the way 
back to national prominence in the 
late 1970s. In his second year on 
campus, Johnson nailed one of the 
largest single shots in Illini history. 
He beat the buzzer, No. 1 Michigan 
State and Magic Johnson in 
Assembly Hall as Illinois moved to 
15-0 on the season before dropping 
its next game. In Johnson's senior 
year, he moved to the top of U of 
Is scoring list and guided the team 
to its first NCAA tournament in 19 
years. 




^ 



Three-time Olympian Craig Virgin 
easily wins the race for Illinois' best 
distance runner ever. Virgin swept 
up four Big Ten titles in as many 
years and even added the 1975 
NCAA championship for good mea- 
sure. He went on to claim two 
world titles in cross-countiy during 
a distinguished 11 year professional 
career. 



Big Ten 



229 



The 1980s 




Bardo, Gill, Anderson, Battle and Hamilton. The 
starting five for 1989s Flying Illini squad sky- 
rocketed to a No. 1 ranking in the polls and a 
17-0 start after a double-overtime thriller against 
Georgia Tech. Coach Lou Henson's group of 6- 
foot 6-inch clones advanced all the way to 
Seattle and the Final Four before dropping a 
heartbreaker to Michigan, a team they had 
swept during the Big Ten season. 





Mary Eggers remains the standard by which 
all of Illinois women's volleyball coach Mike 
Hebert's standouts are measured. In between 
being named Big Ten Freshman of the Year 
and Flonda National Player of the Year as a 
senior in 1988, Eggers led the Illini to con- 
secutive Final Four appearances and helped 
establish Illinois as the dominant volleyball 
program in the Midwest. 






Illinois' last trip to the Rose Bowl in 
Pasadena, Calif., came in 1984. Coach 
Mike White's best squad became the only 
school to beat all nine conference opp- 
ponents in one campaign (Penn State 
became a member in 1993), a feat that 
overshadows the actual Rose Bowl. 
Despite entering the game ranked fourth 
and a decisive favorite, the Illini were 
dismantled by UCLA, 45-9. Defensive 
linemen Don Thorp claimed the Silver 
Football, symbolic of the Big Ten MVP. 



->PORTS 





The 1990s 



Dana Howard capped a brilliant Illinois 
career by capturing the 1994 Butkus Award, 
awarded annually to the best collegiate line- 
backer and named in honor of former Illini 
legend Dick Butkus. The two-time Ail- 
American also became the Big Ten's all-time 
leading tackier against Penn State when he 
made his historic 573rd stop. Howard, who 
is currently playing for the NFL's St. Louis 
Rams, continued the excellent linebacking 
tradition at Illinois that was passed on to 
Kevin Hardy and Simeon Rice this year. 



Illinois basketball standout Deon 
Thomas used a patented baseline 
jump shot in the 1993 Illini 
Classic to become the program's 
career scoring leader. The power 
forward continued to rewrite the 
record books, finishing with 
2,129 points and a host of addi- 
tional records. Thomas recovered 
from a recruiting scandal with 
Iowa and is now playing profes- 
sionally in Spain after being 
drafted by the Dallas Mavericks. 




Renee Heiken, unquestionably 
the greatest golfer in Illini histo- 
ry, earned Big Ten medalist hon- 
ors twice in her illustrious career. 
She placed in the top six nation- 
ally three consecutive years and 
was named the National Player 
of the Year before graduating to 
the Ladies Professional Golf 
Association (LPGA). 



Mlliiillllilliliiililliii """"" '""""" ' "'' 


ipa 


VHF 


L \ 


'Mlllliy^^^*^ 


=i:^*^1996 


p896^*S~ 


'^fii:iiifii;^i^Piii 



Big Ten 



231 



m 




m 



It 







^m\ 








m ■ 




r4 

K 1 


p^g^F]! 


■ w^^^ aoi^i^ 




XT' 



Greeks and 
Organizations 

Pam Riley, Editor 

Throughout the college experience many students find themselves 
changing their values, vievv/s and beliefs. This often is a result of the 
experiences they have when they join organizations or Greek life on 
campus. The people we meet, places we go and impressions we get 
from the groups we are part of change how we see the world around 
us, and even how we see ourselves. 

When one becomes part of a group they become a piece of what that 
group stands for. Only the process of different pieces composed of 
individuals' attitudes and assets coming together forms a whole that 
can get things done and make changes. By working together a unique 
and creative mosaic can be formed. 

The University of Illinois may only be four years of your life, but the 
experiences are ones that you will have forever. You may have joined a 
club for the purpose of helping others, learning a new skill or just 
gaining friends and having more fun. Whatever the case, you are a 
piece of that group and it becomes a piece of you. It has helped you 
develop as a person. It has helped you deal with the crazy environment 
called college. Mostly, it has helped you to focus on the future. 

Nowhere is it more apparent than in dealing with organizations and 
Greek life, that there is more to school than classes. As a matter of fact, 
many times what you do in an organization ends up influencing your 
future more than your major or your classes. 

These ideas and sharing them with others may be what truly is the 
spirit of college, and this is often what lasts after the diploma is 
forgotten. 

If you look at the University of Illinois as a giant mosaic, 
organizations and Greek life are definitely a piece of the picture that 
cannot be replaced. It influences everyone and their own personal life 
mosaic. 

Some people may resent the phrase "get involved." These people are 
the ones who may find something missing from their mosaic. It may 
not be as beautiful, creative and exciting as they have hoped. 
University of Illinois students should not let this happen, though. 
There is always time to add just one more piece to the mosaic. 



Table of Contents 






B^ 


^ 


■ 


Ir? 




bli^ 


Wk 


jt , 


) 


1 


Hl; 


■^ ,v ^B 




R-E* 


i^p^ 


-X 


H 




k!^'' 




K -^ 


/ /' 


/! 


^H 




^^i 




&'«i-^ili 


f: 


J 


«i 




Pl 






m&^ 


itts 


¥$ 




r^ 





Acacia 

Alpha Chi Omega 

Alpha Delta 

Alpha Delta Pi 

Alpha Epsilon Phi 

Alpha Gamma Delta 

Alpha Gamma Rho 

Alpha Gamma Sigma 

Alpha Omicron Pi 

Alpha Phi 

Alpha Rho Chi 

Alpha Sigma Phi 

Alpha Tau Omega 

Beta Theta Pi 

Chi Epsilon 

Chi Omega 

Delta Chi 

Delta Delta Delta 

Delta Gamma 

Delta Phi 

Delta Tau Delta 

Delta Xi Phi 

Delta Zeta 

Farmhouse 

Four H 

Gamma Phi Beta 

Kappa Alpha Theta 



280 
246 
280 
274 
239 
236 
237 
238 
240 
243 
281 
241 
242 
273 
277 
294 
250 
278 
244 
281 
247 
249 
248 
283 
254 
252 
256 



4 



NIZATIONS 







Greeks 



Kappa Delta 


253 


Kappa Delta Rho 


284 


Kappa Kappa Gamma 


258 


Kappa Sigma 


260 


Lambda Chi Alpha 


261 


Phi De ta Theta 


290 


Phi Kappa Psi 


293 


Phi Kappa Sigma 


292 


Phi Kappa Tau 


262 


Phi Mu 


268 


Phi Sigma Kappa 


263 


Phi Sigma Sigma 


266 


Phi Tau Gamma 


267 


Pi Beta Phi 


264 


Pi Kappa Alpha 


286 


Pi Lambda Phi 


288 


Psi Upsilon 


291 


Sigma Delta Tau 


285 


Sigma Kappa 


270 


Sigma Lambda Beta 


285 


Sigma Lambda Gamma 


290 


Sigma Pi 


291 


Tau Epsilon Phi 


289 


Theta Chi 


282 


Theta Xi 


251 


Triangle 


272 


Beta Psi 


279 



Theta Chi 


282 






Theta Xi 


251 






Triangle 


272 






Beta Psi 


279 








^m^m^SmSmS^ 










Table of Contents 


235 


HHHi^^HHl 


■^■■■■■■i 


^^^^^^^^mM^. 


^H 



Alpha Gamma Delta 





Alpha Gamma Delta Seniors and the Alma Mater: First Row: A. Zima. 
D. Ingrassia. M. Hagen. Second Row: C. Starkey, T. Bllnn, D. Rolf. N. 
Crawford. Third Row: R. Halges, J. Adamo, J, Koca, J. Arndt. J. 
Schoenlnger. Fourth Row: J. Bashaw. K. Starkman. C. Brown. G. Hoffer. 
R. Shenck, L. Douglas. Chin, E. Brennan. A. Sacchltello. S. Johnson. 
Fifth Row: K. Wiseman, K. Peters. 










Alpha Gamma Rho 





O A social/profes- 
sional fraternity 
where unity lies in 
tine fact that all 
members have sin- 
cere interest in 
agriculture. 

O Members hold 
leadership posi- 
tions in many orga- 
nizations. 



Alpha Gamma Rho: First Row: Nathan Kress, Dan Stokes, Brad Marten, Jeff Davis, George Lukach, Nick Frank, B.J. Smith, Rob Swinger, Clint Peters. Andrew Miller. Brandon Wright, 
Jeremy Strubhar, Kent Wishop, Andy Colan, Bryce Hoffman, Justin Short. Second Row: Craig Lee, Cliff Peterson, Brian Cahill, Jim O'Brien, Jim Hughes, Wade Baumgartner, Matt Frank, Bill 
Adams, Shane Koonce, Allan Venters, Chad Ruppert, Nathan Marsh, Ryan Fleming. Scott Swartzendruber. Third Row: Jeremy Hogan, Bradley Wolter, Ben Wenzel, Ryan Aupperle, Andrew 
Shissler, Aaron Vancil, Doug Lakamp, jason Pickrell, Jeremy Morris. Bret Hitchings. Stephen Lang, Erich Schott, Nathan Augspurger, John Dickinson, Jason Logsdon, Matt Boudeman, Brad 
Rademacher, advisor Dr. Gary Pepper. Fourth Row: Matt O'Donnell, Dave Mouser, Bryce Rupert, Tom Foley, Jared White, Jon Heyen, Ben Poletti, Kyle McMillan, Dan Lane, Dan Smith, Tom 
Sutter, Steve Knodle, Seth Baker. Matt Rustemeyer, Colby Hoffman. 



• TlT'Vi:; ■^ffWWJW. 




Ipi 



O We were originally an independent cooperative house organized in 
1949 by World War II veterans. 

O We became affiliated with the national chapter in 1981. 

O We maintain a cooperative spirit with 50 members doing all the 
cooking, cleaning, and minor repairs. 

O We are near the top of the fraternities for member development 
and participation. 

O Our philanthropy is Adopt a School and Habitat for Humanity. 




I I i I 



m $ k ^ ^ 



Alpha Gamma Sigma: Row One: Brian Reimer. Blaine Eden, Brent Baker, Doug Raber, Therron Dieckmann, Greg Brown, Dave Dorn. Eric Reutter. Row Two: Derek Sclirot. Damn Brodie, 
Mike Hemann, Brian Meyer. Brad White, Craig Tanner, Scott Bretthauer, Tim Kellog, Brian Fogarty. Row Three: Chad Miller, Aaron Heinzniann, Dan Glaenzer, Chad Bingnian. Chris Oswald, 
Kevin Monk, Joshua Kempel, Rob Brown, Robbie Allaman, Row Four: Brian Anderson, Jay Tamblyn, Ronnie Albers, Rye Randolph, Wyatt Sweitzer, Jason Goodner, Mike Dare, Scott Mozingo. 
Row Five: Zach Janssen, Matt Jewell, Kyle Sands, Jeff Boldt, Josh Hackett. Brad Dorsey. Karl Scherer, Chris Kallal, Allen Sasse, Jay Manning, Brad Graves. 



1 4 



M:: 



Alpha Epsilon Phi 




Alpha Epsilon Phi Seniors: Row One: Kim Haskell, Anna Eisner, Dayna Salasche, Amy Katz, Amy 
Schwartz, Julie Pearl. Row Two: Reed Berger, Allison Singer, Merri Weiss, Erica Strenshein, Stacy Lipitz, 
Darby Willis, Jen Mann, Rachel Abarbanel, Kim Johnson. Row Three: Heather Kelmachter, Stacey 
Goldstein, Come Kahan, Lisa Goodman, Laura Saunders, Julie Barman, Jenny Allswang, Rachel Goldstein 





O Our nickname is 

A E Phis. 

O Alpha Epsilon Phi 
has a long history of 
high GPAs among 
our sorority mem- 
bers. In the past, 
we have had the 
most 5.0s out of any 
sorority. 

O Our colors are green 
and white and our 
symbol is the 
giraffe. 

O Our chapter flower is 
the Lily of the Valley. 

O We raise money for 
our philanthropies. 
These are the Chaim 
Sheba Medical 
Center and AIDS 
Foundation. 

O We are located at 

904 S. Third St. 
Stop on by! 



Alpha Epsilon Phi: Row One: Stephanie Morris, Dana Gelfeld, Bonnie Banoff, Margaret Simon, Stephanie Katz, Melissa Tenzer, Jenn Steiner. Sandy Barman, Coutney Taylor, Randi Stem, 
Katie Mordini, Stacy Freidman, Marcy Linderman, Liz Alexander, Stephanie Dubin, Allison Raphael, Paula Greenberg, Liz Strauss, Brandi Cohen, Sue Warman, Lisa Touretz, Jennifer 
Coleman, Julie Freidman, Amy Berlin, Tori Zummo, Katie Gold, Erica Cohen. Row Two: Jamie Mendelson, Ronit Selinger, Melissa Cohen, Rachel Pomerantz, Abbey Levine, Julie Melnick, 
Dana Portman, Nicole Furtak, Barbara Fine, Amanda Schneider, Stacy Freedman, Natalie Greenberg, Maren Goldberg, Jem Slaw, Dawn Sideman, Amy Olefsky, Melissa Skale, Erin 
Mangurten, Dana Gutman, Beth Milligan. Row Three: Jamie Moekler, Dee Bolos, Lindy Golfader. Jill Suroff. Jaime Berk, Lori Kreloff, Wendy Diamond, Marci Gitles, Jen Leavitt, Jocelyn 
Fischer, Alisa Kirsche, Hilary Silber, Jen April, Kathy Ballsrud, Maya Israel, Tricia Shepard, Kathy Berger, Charlotte Izsak, Bonnie Rosen, Liz Schwartz, Liz Melam, Amy Freidman, Jamie 
Rosenstein, Jodie Serlin, Mindy Neidich, Gail Bianchi, Jen Flaig, Erin Schwartz. Row Four: Jenny Hilb, Rochelle Fetter, Amy Braverman, Lauren Mednick, Genna Chanenson, Jill Smiley, 
Allison Royce, Allison Morris. Row Five: Rachel Libman, Michelle Bauer, Jen Kramer. Missy Kahn, Staci Levin, Jenny Soshnick, Dana Wisberg, Jen Lifshin, Frannie Goldberg, Nancy Slutsky. 
Rachel Feldheim, Michelle Shames, Michelle Bezman, Adena Ben-Dov, Mikki Miller, Debbie Bogoslaw, Jen Rudich, Tal Selinger, Marci Mirken, Marti Rosen, Jodie Shinsky, Erin Orloff. 
Brandi Schwechter, Heather Levie. Row Six: Kristen Fahlen, Robin Kaplan, Carolyn Sperle, Amy Salasche, Gayle Warm, Jenny Smith, Karen Bernstein, Row Seven: Amy Schwartz, Amy 
Katz, Laurie Kraemer. Anna Eisner, Staci Lipitz, Kim Haskell, Stacey Goldstein, Reed Berger, Allison Singer, Dayna Salasche, Mem Weiss, Erica Sternshein, Darby Willis, Laurie Saunders, 
Julie Barman, Jenny Allswang, Jen Mann. Rachel Abarnel, Corrie Kahan. Julie Pearl, Dana Berk, Rachel Goldstein, Heather Kelmachter, Lisa Goodman. Kim Johnson. 




Greeks 



239 



Alpha Omicron Pi 




Alpha Omicron Pi Seniors: First Row: Kim May, Mandy Thomson, Melanie Gargano. Second Row: Kristen Zage, Christine Pfaffinger, Danielle 
Frese, Kristie Pelletier, Carrie Havey. Third Row: Katie Meyer, Judith Cookis, Denise Beegun, Kelly Gehrke, Delane Heldt, Jennifer Marsh, Pam 
Brown, Amy Dyksta. 



'I IS a stron 
international 
women's fraternity 
with 170 colle- 
giate chapters in 
the United States 
and Canada. 

O Our chapter colors 
are cardinal red 
and white. 

O We raise money 
with Run for the 
Roses, to benefit 
the Arthritis 
Research , 
Foundation. 

O Each spring on the 
last day of classes 
before reading day, 
we hold an event 
called Porch Fling. 
We invite all of our 
friends to the 
house to barbecue, 
play volleyball, lis- 
ten to music and 
talk. 

O Some of our other 
special events 
include Barn 
Dance, Winter 
Stocking Formal, 
Kidnap and a 
Spring Formal. 



Alpha Omicron PI: First Row: J. Pierog, M. Heniff, M. Judge, C. Huntley, A. Whelchel, S. Zats, A. Gurley. K. Evans. L, Costa, S. Whalen, A. Ceriale, K. Odum. K. Allen, K. Stoner. J. 
Garbishch. Seond Row: M. Svetllc, J. Bravieri, T. Reinhart, C. Tiska. S. Holmes, H. Pedersen, J. Mennenga, J. Scheer, J. Frost, A. Bala, M. Lord, M. Bailey, S. Cartenter. Third Row: K. 
Diestel, C. McAughtry, H. Breen, E. Jenni, C. Ochoncinski, L. Robb, J. Wade, S. Steinberg, N. Roberts, M. Princehorn, N. Claps, B. Sabrowski, Fourth Row: D. Beegun, L. Jelm. N. Sabuco, K, 
Kristan, L, Nelson, N. Kotsovetis, M. Starr, K. Korosa, S, Arnold. Fifth Row: J. Reinhart. C. Piatek. M. Thomson. C. Have, B. Heser, W. Rogowski. J. Cookis, K. Meyer, P. Brown. A. Dykstra. 
C. Pfaffinger, M. Operzedek. J. Drost. N. Austin. Sixth Row: B. DeChristopher, L. Eder. L. Vance. M. Koch. J. Laudeman. M. Babiarz. T. Ferro. K. Gehrke. N. Skarda. K. Pelletier. C. Amann. J, 
Marsh, D. Frese. Seventh Row: J. Baldner, M. Mitchell. C. Aveyard. S. Mahrer. A. Nordbrock, L. Jesberg. M. Baran, N. Czech. G. Torres. A. Mondul. T. Lamb. J. Gertsma. K, Beba, M. Shah. 
M. Gargano, M. Shanahan. K. Zage. Eighth Row: R. Kopay, E. Ecklund, M. Janas, L. Baloun, E. Biancalana. C. Reetz. J. Kanaris. R. Betz. N. Wieber. P. Ghuman. D. Heldt. K. May. Ninth Row: 
Slotkay, R. Fisher, S. Langley. G, Bruck, Katie Kibbons, B. Johnsen. S. Goldfarb. B. Ullrick. L. Smith. 





friCff^iltteifMSiWl 





Alpha Sigma Phi 




\lpha Sigma Phi Seniors: First Row: Mike Showers, Jeffery Remotigue. Lance McOlgan, Ed Shannon. Second Row: Sunll Ayyagari, Jim Moody, 
5an Baltes, Scott Stawarz, Nathan Hood, Brad Haag. Third Row: Dave Wagner, Steve Pytlak, Jim FIgura, Juan Cabrales, Mike Buedel. 



proud to announce 
our 150th anniver- 
sary. This year we 
have celebrated 
with a sesquinte- 
nial celebration in 
South Carolina. 

O Eta chapter had an 
extremely success- 
ful year for rush 
culminating with a 
30-man pledge 
class. 

O Renovation of our 
chapter continues. 
This summer, 
house occupancy 
increased by seven 
members with the 
addition of three 
new rooms. 

O The men of Alpha 
Sigma Phi continue 
to make vital contri- 
butions to campus 
leadership. 

O Our lllio page is 
dedicated to our 
brother, Matthew 
Tasio. Brother 
Tasio passed into 
Omega Chapter in 
the summer of 
1995. 



Alpha Sigma Pi: First Row: Adam Berg, Eric Raasch, David Ripley, Brian Berqulst, Dean Brown, Jacob Jones, Jason Diehl, Brian Kiep, Fred Trocone. Mark McClaIn, Mike Slattery, Brenden 
Clough. Second Row: James Veers, Ryan Philo, Rick Rutter, Bruce Cope, Sunil Ayyagari, Craig Horstman, Noam Alon, Nathan Hood, Brad Haag, Jeff Remotigue, Mike Showers, Tome Shukas, A! 
Enrique, Scott Stawarz, Lance McOlgan, Steve Remotigue, Aaron Meder, Zach Thomas, Lawrence Brown. Third Row: Andrew Calvert, Jim Bialecki, Mike Jasutis, Doug Godfrey, Jim Moody, Dave 
Wagner, Rick Lawrence, Ryan Stawarz, Mike Young, Mike Buedel, Scott Havranek, Chuck Veers, B. K. Bala, Mike Gillis, Mike Novack, Ed Shannon, Matt Singer, Jaime Jeffs, Greg Wehmann, 
Steve Quan, Anup Shah, Jeremy Bernard, Tim Harshbarger. Josh O'Connor. Fourth Row; Leo Splzzirri, Jim Vozza, Matt Frank, Dan Cullerton, Jim Figura, Juan Cabrales, Larry Barry, Eric Sachs, 
Brandon Wysoglad, Dan Baltes, Steve Lebahn, Steve Pytlak, Blair Bobyk, Derrick Kaiser, Patrick Peters, Jeff Kasaiko, Chris Dasse. 





ri 



Greeks 



241 




Alpha Tau Omega 






vt',' 



O ATOs hold the Fall 
Classic for Josh 
Gottheil's 
Lymphona 
Research Fund. 

O Our symbol is the 
castle and our col- 
ors are blue and 
gold. 

O Alpha Tau Omega 
is one of the U of 
I's largest social 
fraternities. 

O We have won 
many honors as a 
group over the 
past year. 

Alpha Tau Omega Seniors: First Row: Brad Gwillam, Steve Spychalski, Greg Swedo, Eric Handley, Andrew Cashman, IVlattliew IVlasucci. Second Row: Brad Foster, Ryan Yagoda, Chan Lim, Jon 
Vieley. Dan Vanderweit, Tim Cochran, Chris Crawford, Sterling Simpson. Third Row: Jeremy Rumps, Bill Burlem, Brandon Gebhardt, Cory Kotowski. Fourth Row: Dave Drinan, Glen Kosowski, 
Andrew Nedzel, Tom Palkon, Marshall Farnum. Not Pictured: Brian Welch, Dave Picard, John Bucklar, Andrew Maclntyre. 




Alpha Tau Omega: First Row: Andrew Cashman, Tim Cochran, Greg Swedo, Sterling Simpson, John Bucklar, Brad Gwillam, Brian Welch, Daniel Vanderweit, Steven Spychalski, Chris Crawford, 
Dave Picard, Brad Foster, Andrew Maclntyre. Second Row: William Burlein, Tom Palkon, Jeremy Rumps, Chan Lim, Dave Drinan, Ryan Yagoda, Eric Handley, Cory Kotowski, Kevin Fleck. James 
Gensler, Brandon Gebhardt, Andrew Nedzel. Third Row: Glen Kosowski, Jon Vieley, Craig Carmichael, Mark Lieyos, Steven Currey, John Barrientes, Tony Perkins, Christopher Kennesey, Matthew 
Mac Lean, Jeffery Chou, Scott Brakenridge, Jason Hall, Drew Raucci, Dan Frank, Francis Hollweck, David Duensing, Matthew Foxx. Fourth Row: David Yocks, John Vlahavas, Rob Malstrom, 
Mark Buttercoch, Brandon Peele, Quinn Carlson, Mark Schumaker, Jason Muncy, Andrew Kern, Matt Zieba, Cheeks Moran, Benji Larson, Tyler Simpson, Pat Jensen, Brian Ruff, Drew Parks, Phil 
Drennan, Mark Phillip, Jason Richmond. Fifth Row: Josh Butkis, Jim Schiedhauer. Steve Hodgett, Ryan Pott, Jeff Olsheski. Andy Sharpy, Bryan Baker, Jason Jayski, Tyler Sandberg, Tom Drugan, 
Matt Zwolinski, Mark Ambler, Greg Foster, Christian Rambaker, Josh M. Carter, Jeremy Tulle, Marshall Farnum. Sixth Row: Mike Hearn, Andrew Marguetis, Dave Lin, John Gottool, Proctor 
Robison, Mike Hunt, Joel Werner, C. A. Germann, Dave Monkey, Mark Werner, L. Ernst, Daryl Micheli, Shane Colby, Mike Cacini, Chris Carroll, Jon Nietschki, Trevor Menards, L. Spychalski, 




Phi sponsored the 
4th annual "King 
of Hearts," a phil- 
anthropic event 
that allows frater- 
nity men to show 
off and raise 
money for heart 
and lung research. 

O We boast a very 
strong internation- 
al chapter with 
over 140 chapters 
in the United 
States and 
Canada. 

O Alpha Phi repre- 
sents a winning 
spirt in every- 
thing. 

O The Alpha Phi 
symbol of the ivy 
leaf represents 
diverse interests 
and a strong bond 
of sisterhood. 

O Above all, the 
women of Alpha 
Phi love to be out 
and have a good 
time. 



Alpha Phi: First Row: Beth Miglin, Amy Sellenberg. Second Row: Leslie Crossan, Susan Hoss, Kirsten Siron. Kimberly Ohrem, Lindsay West, Jennifer Siebert. Jennifer Heiney, Kelli Klien, 
Cara Sheehy, Renee Kerouac, Susan Wilczenski, Joy Augustine, Danelle Spratt, Wendy Lowenstein. Heather McGowan, Kristin Moore, Allison Nickerson. Third Row: Amanda Weber, Serene 
Ghalayini, Jennifer Etters, Jessica Woodward, Margit Zsolnay, Juliann Gleeson, Lori Wylie, Kern Miller, Liz Goulding, Pilar Gallego, Carrie Slaymake, Carlee Defrates. Fourth Row; Liz Garibay, 
Kathy Parsons, Kelly Wall, Jill Moody, Julie Rymsza, Laura McGrath, Lisa Petraitis, Christy Gomorczak, Sarah Smalley, Jennifer Lamb, Lindsey Marshall. Erin Derango, Marta Spagnuolo, 
Ginger Imler, Rebecca Hahn, Dallas Sipes. Fifth Row: Dorrine Hoss, Maria Gaziano, Shannon Huffman, Julie Karvelis, Jenny Harris, Julie Huskey, Christine Danko, Jennie Braun, Jenny Gras, 
Carlye Faliek, Jennifer Williams, Bonnie MacDonald, Jamia Stortzum, Heather Sparr, Stephanie Dorio, Michelle Knuckey, Renee Ovcina, Johanna Johnston, Lisa Pauly, Robin Dockery, Ann 
Brenner, Sixth Row: Joy Casner, Andrea Vlasak, Amy Robinson, Erin Bavougian, Bridget Cunningham, Liz Grabowski, Becky Carlson, Corin Tablis, Jennifer Winer, Melissa Hunt, Kris Lesters, 
Alison McCarthy, Joan Mocek, Christy Caughey. Danielle Peabody, Megan Meyer, Katie Stembridge, Kim Fisher, Jennifer Tate, Erica Pearson, Tracy Haye. Seventh Row: Megan Stevenson, 
Becky Underwood, Karen Fleming, Amy Louise Miller, Ellen McGuire, Jenny Brewer, Tricia Lefler, Kori Felver, Erica Heine, Jessica Newman, Christy Connell, Lisa McGivern, Lynn Stengel, 
Kathy Axe, Kathy Gomez, Holly Hulina, Andrea Gonzalez, Amy Vogt, Janine Rader, Kris Harenza, Allison Ton, Mickey Manning, Chris Trella, Sandy Oh, Tracy Walczak, Danielle Craven, Linda 
Samson, Diane Burrell, Jenny Daley, Sheri Hatfield, Carrie Justin, Jodi Stehman, Kristi Johnson, Denise Gleich, Beth Bacevich, Julie Lonze, Lyn Debatin, Mindy Schultz, Andrea Peck, Sheryl 
Koch, Amy Keller. Eighth Row: Diane Steinkamp, Megan Mead, Sandie Bass, Kerry Zakrzewshi, Gena Zarcone. Melissa Lufkin, Anna Nommensen, Summer Sipes, Sharon Goldman. Julia 
Warner, Betsy Hubbard. Amy Kesman. 






REEKS 



243 




Delta Gamma 








Delta Gamma: First Row: E. Thompson, J. Novak, A. Trottier, C. Davis, C. Hall, G. Austgen, S. Ulbnch, L. Jones, M. Angio, K. Garlson. Second 
Row: K. Lierman, A. Hendricks, N. Wiwat, C. Aitken, L. Seilheimer, K. Hackett, S. Kamp. T. Williamson, E. Scott, T. Veluz, N. Sansone, S. 
Svenson, K. Hyett. Third Row: N. Romano, S. Holm, K. Mouser, D. Franklin, D. Bishop, M. Kirchner, S. Pippel, H. Briggs, C. Lee, J. Oshwald, K. 
Paul, S. Garske, M. Kallstrom, D. Michalczyk, J. Cherny, K. Lubawski, S. Delia, K. Dunn, J. Hoobler, S. Powers, T. Mendez. Fourth Row: M. 
Lively, C. Lichner, A. Koch, M. Sheehan, J. Maccari, A. Podhrasky, S. Abbey, D. Napora, A. Carlborg, J. Steffenburg, S. Paulsen, L. Seilheimer, 
K. O'Donnoghue, A. Bjerkan, K. Garfield. Fifth Row: H. Bausell C. Haggerty, J. Gomeric, S. Flock, A. Johnson, J. Norbut, R. Williams, A. Popp, 
D. Graves, J. Hjertstedt, J. Locke, S. Millman, M. Tegman, R. Scott, L. Benedict, C. Munson, J. Doud, E. McCabe. Sixth Row: J, Flynn, T. 
Moore, B. Hewlett, E. Czaczoski, K. Nunez, K. Hillemeyer, D. Kuchipudi, M. Merz, L. Krajecki, R. Flammang. Seventh Row: K. Morschauser, S, 
Wackerlin, C. Sitz, L Dixon, M. Collins, B. Elza, J. Williams, G. Sieks, K. Vecchio, T. Garfield, E. Allison, K. Parsons. K. Nelson. S. Millman K. 
Kramer, A. Lewis, C. Benedict, T. Longoria, C. Downs. Eighth Row: B. Bending, N. Chapman, K. BrestVanKampen, C. Garrett, J. Cavey, K. 
Collins, T. EkI. A. Goetz, T. Paelella, M. Ococho, B. Hassell. J. Roush, J. Schaefer, C. Freese, K. Habishon, R. Hendricksen. 




244 



Greeks 



J 




O lota Dee Gees con- 
tribute more than 
1000 hours of com- 
munity service to 
theChampaign/ 

Urbana area 
through campus 
and community vol- 
unteer projects. 

O New members' 
transition to college 
life are made easi- 
er by help and guid- 
ance from older 
girls through our 
captain crew pro- 
gram. 

O Delta Gamma's 
symbol is an 
anchor. The anchor 
in front of the 
house is rented 
from the U.S. Navy 
for one dollar a 
year. 

O Delta Gamma edu- 
cates its members 
on a variety of cam- 
pus issues through 
its National Well 
Aware Program. 

O Illinois Dee Gees, 
past and present, 
can now be brought 
together by our new 
Alumni Employment 
Networking Service. 



Alpha Chi Omega 



^ 





O The lota chapter of 
Alpha Chi Omega 
was founded at the 
University of 
Illinois in 1899. 

O Alpha Chi Omega 
has many out- 
standing leaders 
on campus. 
Activities range 
from Student 
Ambassadors and 
mini Footbal 
Recruiting to 
lllinettes and 
Varsity Tennis. 

O Our national philan- 
thropy is "Victims 
of Domestic 
Violence." 

O Alpha Chi Omega 
prides itself on the 
high academic 
acheivement of her 
members at the 
University of 
Illinois. 

O lota was proud to 
have been chosen 
by our National 
Headquarters to be 
the pilot chapter 
for a newly struc- 
tured pledge pro- 
gram in Fall 1993. 



Alpha Chi Omega Seniors: First Ruv.: K. Siilei, A. Growney, A. Jensen. B. Naatz. T. Gulley. C. Roltstein. Second Row: J. Johnson, A. Garceau, 
K. Armstrong. C. Dewitt. J. Heedum, E. McDearmon. Third Row: K. Halac. J. Mayer. S. OIkiewicz, A. Peterson, L. Mangano. C. Pasquesi, M. 
Darrow. 




Alpha Chi Omega: First Row: M. Piano, R, Taurina. A. Waldorf. A. PIcard. S. Johnson. E. McCarthy, R. Brush. Second Row: A. Dertley, 
R. Ray. K. Costa. E. Buscalno. B. Paley. T. Plank. Third Row: J. Larson. A. Priest. A Kulemeler, K. Breda. B, Wang. G. Dunibrava, S. 
Toth. Fourth Row: I, Sawchuck, M, Apostolopoulos, J. Rutland, C. Roder. L. Machado. J, Irwin. D. Degraff. Fifth Row: R. Bloch. J. 
Hanna. K. Bright. A. Roach. T. Johnson. J. Buesinger. J. Stubblefield. J. Stem. M. Kapellen. J. Malec. B. Holmes. Sixth Row: M. 
Jaconetti, S. Arndt. A. Anspachh. E. Kyro. M, McCorquadate. D. Heedum. G. Boens. K. Lies, A. Herman, S. Hirsch. S. Frank, J. Cieslak, 
M, Finn, S, Taylor, A. DumalskI, L. Bourdreaux, B. Stephen. C. Cochran. J. Barch. B. Welch. C. Janacek. A. McCarter, J. Botica, S. 
Busen. S. Barnes. J. SInaki, K. McMahan, E. Doyle. Seventh Row: P. Vyas. B. Desmond. K. Johnson. G. Zawodnlak. K. Kurth, M. Gray, 
H. Schlaffer, R. Sanderson. M. Worman. S. McClowery, J. Dorlghi. M. Lucie. T. Fadden. M. Russo. B. Brennan. M. Kuclk. M. Hanley, K. 
Springer. L. Callendo. L. Tierney. A. Garrison, M. Phlpps. M. Guleserian. M. Welsch. S. Becker. C. Waldhoff. J. Fenogllo. S. Hardy. C. 
Evans. K. Morrison. M. Piptone. Eighth Row: J. Heedum. J. Mayer, A. Jensen. K. Halac. Ninth Row: C. Dewitt. K. Caprlo. S. Gutllla. C. 
Pasquesi. J. Latshaw. C. Roitstein, A. Petersen, A. Growney, 8. Naatz. T. Gulley. S. OIkiewicz. T. Soragan. B. Henningsen, E. Chin. L 
Wolff. J. Beltrame. K. Harty. M. Humay. L. Byers. M. Ranquist. A. Garceau. B. Stanley. 



Delta Tau Delt 




:^'^ 



i:.'€^ 



.>^^'^^^' 




OFounded in 1872, 
Delta Tau Delta is 
the oldest continu- 
ous fraternity at 
the University of 
Illinois. 

O Delta Tau Delta 
fields teams in a 
wide variety of 
intramural sports 
and enters several 
tournaments each 
semester. 

O Delta Tau Delta 
sponsors an annu- 
al flag football 
tournament. 

O The Delt House 
continually ranks 
among the top 
houses academi- 
cally each semes- 
ter. Illinois Delt 
Alumni also fund 
scholarships each 
year. 

O Over the years, 
Delts have creat- 
ed a strong bond 
based on trust, 
mutual respect 
and a commitment 
to making the 
most of college 
and post-college 
life. 



K«i- " ijrs'ici 



Delta Zeta 




O With 175 chapters 
in the United 
States and 
Canada, Delta Zeta 
has grown to be 
the largest national 
sorority. 

O The Delta Zeta col- 
ors are Old Rose 
and Vieux Green, 
the chapter flower 
is the Killarny Rose 
and the symbol is 
the turtle. 

O The Delta Zeta phil- 
anthropy is speech 
and hearing 
impaired, Galludet 
University. 

O Dee Zees won first 
place in the home- 
coming float con- 
test this year with 
Sigma Phi Delta 
Fraternity, as well 
as being Intramural 
Soccer Champions. 

O President Michelle 
Kesterke won the 
Panhellenic 
Outstanding 
President Award, 
this is the fourth 
consecutive year 
for the President of 
Delta Zeta to win 
the award. 




Delta Zeta Seniors: First Row: Christy Urena, Nichole Baranski, Debbie Bonus. Second Row: Carrie Arends. Joey Papa. Juliann Gray, 
Allison Greenfield. Jodi Altenbaumer. Rebecca llllgan. Ann Schmltz. Third Row: Kristen Ward. Sandy Jodlowski. Rachel Strzelinski. Leslie 
Warden. Beth Daily, Christine MIchonskl. Fourth Row: Alicia Pack. Sarah Lucas. Jen McKiernan, Christy O'Connell. Pauline Pakla. Tricia 
Walsh. Shellean Berry, Charlene SIson. Fifth Row: Julie Zackary, Chrlssy Fricker, Sue Pruski, Melissa Grant, Jenna Deysher, Beckey 
Kozdran, Angle Robinson. Sixth Row: Missy Smart, Michelle Kesterke, Karen Scheeler, Michelle Grasso, Kann Ostling, Mary Jane Potthoff. 



Greeks 



Delta Xi Phi 




Delta Xi Phi: First Row: Anonya Majumdar. Second Row: Adrlana Garcia, Aida Derat. Third Row: Miraj Sharlff. Maria G. Barrera, Caria R. 
Ortega. Fourth Row: Cheryl A. Guritz, Ella Morales. Fifth Row: Hanadi Abukhdeir, Christine M. Lopez. Socorro Orozco. Sixth Row: Monica L. 
Arciga. Amani A. Abukhdeir, Roxana Serrano. Seventh Row: Yvonne E. Alvarez, Sharon Lin, Tereclta D. Gomez. Eight Row: Leiah A. Beasley, 
Jennifer J. Hwu. 




O Delta Xi Phi was 
founded on April 
20, 1994, and offi- 
cially recognized 

by the U of I 
Panhellenic Council 
on April 20, 1995. 

O Our purpose is to 
promote multicul- 
tural awareness, 
the advancement of 
women through 
higher education, 
community service, 
sisterhood and 
friendship. 

O Delta Xi Phi is 
involved in a variety 
of volunteer pro- 
grams including: 
Habitat for 
Humanity, 
NiteRides, VIP 
Blood Drive and 
workshops such as 
Self Defense and 
For Women Only. 

O We are a sorority 
for the '90s that 
successfully blends 
the best aspects of 
social, cultural and 
academic sororities, 
while welcoming 
women of all races, 
ethnicities and reli- 
gions. 



Greeks 



249 



elta Chi 




O Delta Chi are intra- 
mural Softball 
champions, basket- 
ball and footbal 
finalists. 

O Our house GPA is 
seventh of all fra- 
ternities-well 
above the all 
men's average. 

O Delta Chi's annual 
block party is the 
largest party on 
campus. 

O Our annual Greek 
Girls on the 
Gridiron 

Philanthropy for 
Don Moyer Boys 
and Girls Club is 
always a success. 

O Delta Chi has par- 
ticipated in 75 
years of tradition 
on campus. 




Delta Chi: First Row: P. Mitchell, A, Hefner, t. Kapernekes. S. O'Kelly, A. Germeny, B. Cox C. Ramey, G. Stiglic, M. Digate. Second Row: P. 
Rundell, E. Zakrewski, W. Sanders. C. White. J. Green. J. Neel. D. Johnson. B. King, M. Ngo, R. Terry. Third Row: J. Ewalt, K. Beckering, A. 
Farber, S. Michau, M. Wojack. J. Pelletiere. J. Grzeskowiak. C. Galvan. T. Walton. J. Meyers. C. Nelson. Fourth Row: 0. Bailitz. G. Koch, B. 
Locasio. J. Carter, C. Crawford, E. Kasper, M. Fischer, A. Wargo. Z. Hayercraft. M. Burnstine. S. Johnson. Fifth Row: L. Kemp. R. Refuik. J. 
Angelino. C. Bair, C. Liebman. D. Connell. Sixth Row: G. Volling. L. Zehnder. T. Brybns. G. Green. D. Kourelis. D. Mirable, E. Hedin. 




Delta Chi Seniors: First Row: D. Kourelis. E. Refuik. S. Michau. E. Zakreski. C. White. E. Kasper. W. Sanders. L. Kemp. Second 

Row: C. Lietaman, E. Hedin. G. Koch, M. Fischer. T. Bruns. S, Volling. S Johnson, I Angelino. 



Dfii-;-:':'.'-.*.' ■ ■ ■■ ■'■'•.■••.•. 





O Theta Xi are 

defending intramur- 
al volleyball cham- 
pions. 

O We donated over 
$5,000 to Habitat 
for Humanity 
through our annual 
philanthrophy 
event, Kidnap-n- 
Ransom. 

O Socially, our annual 
Aztec pool party 
and Hurricane 
party were big suc- 
cesses and lots of 
fun for all. 

O Academically, 
Theta Xi is above 
all men's and all 
fraternity grade 
point average. 

O We placed third in 
the annual 
Homecoming Float 
competition, with 
help from the 
ladies of Kappa 
Kappa Gamma. 



Theta Xi: First Row: B. Belton, K. Ayura. S. Sherry, J. Parenti, R. Visteen, C. Kalish, K. Hopkins, J. Rudlak. Seoncd Row: A. Adams, I. Carrillo, A. Bitkiewicz, S. Svejda, R. Cotner, J. 
Bland, M. Hanlon, B. Nelson. Third Row: B. Ting, J. Chappell, A. Winkler, J. Roenna, R. D'Arco, E. Menneke, G. Hartmann, M. Giebelhausen, K. Haley, A. Jamil, F. Fudali, P. Bosworth, 
M. Stopka, N. Beu, B. Grady. Fourth Row: J. Swanson, P. Leucking. M. Heiser, S. Clemens, A. Hoaganson, E. Cheng, D. Ladgenski, C. Webb, A. Read. A. Stevenson, D. Schupak, M. 
Marrufo. 



yiAi 



Gamma Phi Beta 




O The Omicron 
Chapter of Gamma 
Phi Beta was found- 
ed in June of 1914. 

O Throughout the 
year Gamma Phi 
Beta sponsored a 
wide variety of 
events including 
our annual Golf 
Tournament in 
which members 
caddy for partici- 
pants. Proceeds 
from this tourna- 
ment are donated 
to our philanthropy, 
Camp Sechelt, for 
underpriviledged 
girls in Canada. 

O Academics are also 
very important to 
Gamma Phi Beta, 
and study nights 
are sponsored reg- 
ularly. 

O We also have many 
social events and 
exchanges includ- 
ing our fall formal, 
the "Crescent Ball" 
and our spring 
dance at Turkey 
Run. 



Gamma Phi Beta Seniors: First Row; Mindy Hoffert. Jennifer Alberici, Linsey Brown, Christy Cottom, Jennifer Carmichael, Meg Obenauf, Sandy 
Weiss, Jandy Rahn. Second Row: Gayle Silagyi, Becky Brandi, Maureen Lambe, Katie Dries, Blance Medina. Jennifer Swinehart, Sarah Camper. 
Third Row; Julia Renkes, Mina Alex, Donna Ciesia, Brandy Truckenbrod, Marti Terrell, Kim Murphy, Sarah Mathews. Fourth Row; Gina Perino. Laura 
Wendler. Bahama DuClos. Joella Foster. Tricia Trimpe. Julie Sebastian. Laura Lechowicz. Rebecca Haremza. Tracy Wilson. Sue Ellen Derdzinski. 




Gamma Phi Beta: First Row: E. Egidi, J. Winet. C. Leiner, K. Klimenko. B. Pleiss. J. Young. A. Bernstein, K. Tracy. K. Koch. T. Meier, K. Gerstner. Second Row: C. Bartman, R, Costianis, K. 
Rarnpson, B. Atterberry, H. Ottenfeld. S. Didos, K. Lechwar. A. Warner, A. Palmreuter. E. Kim. K. Reynolds. J. Armstrong. K. Egly, J. Allen. Third Row: S. Henning. M. Phillips. M. Beastall. M. 
Goodman. B. Young, S. Roberts, K. Laurinaitis, L. Bessick. N. Norton. S. Weber. C. Cabalfin. L. Sunderlage. K. Knight. C. Cunningham. Fourth Row; A. Wagner. A. McDaniel. T. Johns. M. 
Hodgson, B. Batten, K. Rhyne. G. Kapsimalis. L. Chambers. R. Tran, T. Carlson. J. Doughney. L. Cerny. C. Garza. Fifth Row; E. Johnson. K. Zimnicki. S. Brown, W. DuClos. A. McGinnis. K. 
Lundberg. K. DeMello. V. Alex. L. Carlson. M. LaPorta, S. Chase, K. Martin, C. Crawford. M. Hulting, M. Dooley. Sixth Row; D. Boyks. L. Nelson, L. Lebo. A. Nativi. A. Nunaniaker. M. Bonino. R. 
Nurkiewicz. K. Buckert. S. Poss, D. Blume. B. Jurgens. K. Kessler. Seventh Row: J. Gilroy, S. Strothoff. J. Ellis, B. Puccini. A. Hughes, J. Ottenfeld, K. Eby, A. Schultz, L. Haugberg. K, Peterson. 
G, Marti. C. Crews. 



s>x-:>>l<;s-:-/-.- •■■.•, 



Kappa Delta^ 



)^- 



:m 



'1l 




Kappa Delta Seniors: First Row: Jennifer Otto. Susan FIttanto, J'ne Kinney, Elise Bowers, Beth Barengo, Tare Harpe, Heather Henning, Tina 
Theodos. Second Row: Jill Hoferle, Amy Lavin, Mary Albertson, Susan Todd, Cathleen Jung, Michelle Harvey, Katherine Clendenin, Lesley Schad, 
Jennifer O'Leary, Aimee Carrasco, Sofia Beshilas. Third Row: Anne Butts. Sonia Spinelli, Kimberly Pryor, Sarah McLeod, Julia Fici<. Katey Tesdall. 
Carmelina Fesi. Natalie Romo. Helen Koulis. Crystal Herbst. 





O Kappa Delta's col- 
ors are green and 
pearl white. 

O We are ranked 
fourth in scholarship 
among all sorori- 
ties. 

O Every March Kappa 
Delta holds its 
annual Shamrock 
Project to raise 
funds for its 
phlanthropy, the 
National Committee 
for the Prevention 
of Child Abuse. 
Locally, Kappa 
Delta supports the 
Champaign Crisis 
Nursery. 

O Kappa Deltas can 
be found every- 
where, participating 
in a lot of diverse 
campus activities. 

O Kappa Delta is a 
group of unique 
and diverse 
women, bound 
together by a circle 
of friendship. 



Kappa Delta: First Row: J. Lewandowski. M. Motz. A. Pratt. A. Opiela, L. Auer, L. Appenzeller, M. Miyamoto. M. Prette, R. Hinrichs, B. Lynch. J. Grady. R. Lesal<. S. Nelson. M. Schulu. Second 
Row: R. Stamper. K. Arnoldy. C. Ernat. K. Lapetina. C. Deyerler. J. Edmund, C. Harris, R. Brooks, K. McCaniel, A. Ethcheson, S. Presnak. J. Dunlap. L. Faber. A. May. T. McVey. M. Chowanec, A. 
Florez, E. Koskan, G. Choi. L. Dacroth. Third Row: L. Forsberg. M. Corry, L. Smith, A. Pyrdek, B. Abrahamson, A. Quesse. G. Salemi, H. Woodrum. K. Marshall, A. Lewsader, R. Hunt, K. Asaro. 
Fourth Row: D. Lesak, A. Stevenson, T. Pilewski, T. Halverson, J. Hauman, J. Iskalis, K. Phillippi, S. O'Grady, A. Ration, J. O'Donnell, K. Randolph, N. Krohn. J. Kawada. J. Levin. T. Buffo, L. 
Frigillana. J. Hinz. Fifth Row: A. Carrasco. H. Koulis. A. Birnbaum. T. Cull. A. Clarke, A, Dunkel. K. Roy. K. Abrahamson. E. Brotherton. S. Martinez. A. Geppinger. D. Schmidt. E. Ereckson, K. 
Iverson. S. Lucas. J. Maasberg. D. Cazan. C. Logan. M. Gervasse. A. Holmes. C. Mathieson. K. Chidley, A. Wurster. Sixth Row: C. Herbst. N. Romo. M. Simms, C. Momon. M. Lang. A Paras. J. 
Lores. T. Gerry. T. Goeddel. L. Bauman, K. Roegge. N. Vavrik. V. Mandzukic. K. Kalseth. M. Curtis, J. Fleenor, H. Oczak. E. Kinneman, S. Gilbertson, S. Clayton, J. Winters, J. Casey, K. Staley. 
Seventh Row: N. Reyes. B, Barengo, J. Kinney, S. Spinelli. K. Pryor. T. Harpe. H. Henning, E. Bowers, M. Harvey, J. Pick. S. McLeod. K. Tesdall. S. Todd. J. Hoferle. C. Jung. C. Pesi. J. Otto, S. 
Fittanto, L. Schad, M. Albertson, A. Lavin, J. O'Leary, K. Clendenin, A. Butts. 




Greeks 



253 



/.. 



4H - House 





O 4-H was founded in 
1934 and is tine 
only 4-H house in 
the nation. 

O In order to become 
a member, each 
woman must have 
participated in 4-H 
for at least five 
years. 

O Joining Panhellenic 
Council in 1981, 
the house contin- 
ues to be active in 
the Greek System 
with events with 
Psi Upsilon, Sigma 
Tau Sigma, Alpha 
Gamma Sigma, Phi 
Gamma Delta, 
Alpha Gamma Rho, 
Theta Chi and 
Nabor House. 

O Two interviewing 
weekends are held 
in the spring to 
select a pledge 
class to move into 
the house the fol- 
lowing fall. 

O 4-H has goals of 
lasting friendships, 
scholastic achieve- 
ment, social oppor- 
tunities and suc- 
cessful cooperative 
living. 



4-H; First Row: M. Snell, H. Roberts, V. Gage, K. Walker, K. Lester, B. Kuster, A. Plumer, B. Smith, S. Scliweitzer, T. Fincl<, H. 
Pope, J. Armentrout, J. Pyle. Second Row: K. Bischoff, T. Lewis, S. Barnard, J. Drach, R. Strode, H. Hinderliter, J. Schumacher, R. 
Stokes, A, Bunselmeyer, M. Enger, L. Webster, C. Schweitzer, G. Brashear, E. Ryterski, S. Flamm. Third Row: S. Hinshaw, L. 
Eyman, J. Wilcoxson, L. Meeker, J. Frederick, S. Springer, J. Croegaert, J. Esworthy, A. Gahlbeck, K. Carngan, J. Bohle, A. Cole, J. 
Bickelhaupt, J. Lehmann, R. Lacey, C. Gehrmg, A. Speir, J. Langdon. Fourth Row: T. Boe, K. Lynch, M. Webster, K. Barkley, M. 
Aggertt, G. Jones, J. Welsh, K. Stokes, L. Allaman, K. Hetzer, S. Mueller, D. Hanson. Not Pictured: M. Adams, B. Brown, B. 
Champion, B. Corbett, S. Flamm, N. Hall, D. Larson, A. Moore, B. Norman, S. Potter, L. Seelow, L. Storm, M. Taft. 



Greeks 



255 



II 



Kappa Alpha Theta 





O Kappa Alpha Theta 
was the first 
women's fraternity 
known in the 
United States and 
its Delta Chapter 
was the first sorori- 
ty at the U of I. 

O We support Court 
Appointed Special 
Advocates as our 
national philan- 
thropy. 

O Kappa Alpha Theta 
and Delta Gamma 
have an annual 
Softball game in 
the spring semes- 
ter each year. Men 
from Beta Theta 
Pi and Alpha Tau 
Omega serve as 
coaches for the 
game. 

O In an attempt to 
increase academic 
awareness, Thetas 
hosted a dinner for 
distinguished facul- 
ty members this 
semester. 

O This year is Theta's 
100th year on cam- 
pus. We are cele- 
brating with alums 
at the Champaign 
County Country 
Club. 



Kappa Alpha Theta: First Row: J. Fabicon, D. Kropp, S. Jaworski, S. Crutcher. T. Sciblor, S. Schlagel, J. Dolan, J. Gorney, K. Chivington, J. Ricardi, J. Caldwell, J. Ramano. C. Brue, K. Anderson, 
K. Helple, A. Bava, G. Schonohoff, D. Schultz. Second Row: A. Pitts, M. Metzl, E. Downey, S. Hanley, H. Wlodek, A. Wilson, N. McTaggart. P. Rinker, C. Kocalis. M. Geanuleas, A. Lanning, S. 
Langfeld, M. Crawford, H. Howerton, C. KIriluk, M. Stone. N. Durden, J. Lemperis, C. Brandt. Third Row: A. Hansen, B. Yl, J. Chase. A. Selitto, J. Washburn. J. Maloney. S. Fall, C. Keough. A. 
Kocalis, C. IVIakris. I. Swenhaugen. E. Steffens. Fourth Row: J. Nakayama, A. Wills, A. Holmes, J. Harroun, S. Frey, N. Brinkman, K. Krueger, C. Tulley, N. Buchanan, D. Wikizer. K. Clow. L. 
Graham, K. Pommerenke, J. Woods, J. Myalls, E. Connor, K. Pearson, K. Parker, A. Knapp, A. Zanic, J. Hardy, E. Neuhaus, J. Hofbauer, J. Canna, M. Holper. Fifth Row: V. Stone, B. Richards. M. 
Hobin, K. Konsoer, J. Supan, K. Rosser, L. McDonald. S. Donahue, J. Mentel, L. Eaton, J. Rubin, A. Habbley, S. Stach, T. Mourelatos, M. Orl. K. Carnevale. D. McClung. B. Schifferdecker. P. 
Lemperis, L. Bykowski, J. Smith. S. Manning, S. Moore, C. Hansen, A. Green, J. Bogelsany, J. Newell. Sixth Row: P. Chavez, A. Falese, A. Hargraves, C. Phillips, L. Hearsley, M. Fitzgibbons. 
Seventh Row: J. Gorman, L. Bilder, S. Downey, E. Smith, A. Donnelly, D. Ander. P. Denning. E. Fen. T. Rinker. E. McCarthy. J. Nobel. J. Cloney, K. Kozeliski, M. Goodman, M, Brannstrom, K. 
Estacop. T. Guzzino. K. Lindgren, A, Schmidt, L. Hearn. 



Greeks 



257 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 




Kappa Kappa Gamma Sisterhood Night 



r 



«p 





O Kappa Kappa 
Gamma is proud to 
have the largest 
chapter on the 
Illinois Campus, 
with over 160 
members. 

O The women of 
Kappas are leaders 
and participate in 
a variety of differ- 
ent organizations. 

O Kappas annual phil- 
anthropy, 
Kappatat, is a 
men's volleyball 
tournament bene- 
fiting Habitat for 
Humanity. This 
year, 23 teams 
participated and 
raised $1000, 
making it a suc- 
cess for everyone. 

O Kappas also enjoy 
their many social 
activities, such as 
exchanges, bid- 
night, formal, barn- 
dance, football 
block, sheiking 
and serenading. 

O Kappas singing 
group, the Pickers, 
is a nationwide 
Kappa tradition. 
They perform for 
fraternities, alums 
and various groups 
around campus. 



Greeks 



259 



n^. 




O Kappa Sigma has a 
rich and glorious 
tradition here at 
the U of I. Our 
chapter is the old- 
est continuous fra- 
ternity still in exis- 
tence here in 
Champaign, and we 
were founded on 
Oct. 15, 1891, by 
Robert Lackey, the 
first football coach 
at the university. 

O Many great men 
involved with U of I 
athletics have 
passed through our 
chapter, including 
Carl Lundgren, 
George Huff and 
Robert Zuppke, 
after whom the 
football field was 
named. 

O Our present chapter 
house was the first 
house built exclu- 
sively for a fraterni- 
ty in the U.S., and 
is recognized as a 
historic site by the 
state of Illinois. 

O We have had two 
out of the last 
three U of I 
Homecoming kings. 




• I 




II 




l^^j 


1' 

ll 


! 

■ 


1 




i 


^Hl^I 



IV, 




mi^HM 










Kappa Sigma: First Row: Victor Hsu, Bob Setlak. Tim Lennon, Brandon Hurlbut, Eric Blair. Second Row: Mark Sawalha, Chad Plemons, 
Scott Suckow, Mark Hudspeth, Jeff Knapp, Josh Kneifel, Dernck Bates. Third Row: Mike Snyders, Tony Morrone, Ramon Arteaga, Jove 
Taino, Matt Hard, Neil Millburger, Kevin Kirby. Fourth Row: Chris Fidler, Kirk Nauman, Daniel Whiston, Jason lannotti. Fifth Row: Ken 
Henricks, Mark Wright, Doug Petersen, Kevin Miller, Mike Stanley, Mike Mateja, Rob Kanabay, George Antonopoulos. Kent Roesslein. Matt 
Jokisch, Kevin Bissell, Chris Kuhl, Paul Valaitis. Dan Healy. Sixth Row: Joel Bersche. Mark DaValle, Dave Gervase. Dan Beckes, Matt 
Schlarb, Brian Gervase, Chris Weidner, Pete Garite, Ryan Vaugn, Dave Samaritano, Kris Skoggsbaken. Rimas Lukas. 



''y-^^l^'^-^/y'O/^- 






rnbda Chi Alpha 




^ 



O Lambda Chi Alpha 
is one of the 
largest fraternities 
on campus. 

O We participate in 
an annual canned 
food drive that ben- 
efits a local food 
bank. 

O Lambda Chi Alpha 
sponsors a reggae 
party as their phil- 
anthropy. It bene- 
fits various local 
charities. 

O Socially, Lambda 
Chis have a huge 
halloween 
exchange, pink 
flamingo hot tub 
party and "crank 
week." 

O Socially, Lambda 
Chis are consis- 
tently ranked in the 
top ten fraternities 
on campus. 



Lambda Chi Alpha: First Row: Jamie Penk, Mike Siska. Mike Stanton. Anil Mansukhani, Dan Knapp. Tre Kraut. Matt Lyons. Eric Ziegle. 
Chris Cheng. Second Row: Chris Podgorski, John Duggan. Anton Malltech. Eric Hanson. Bill O'Donnell, Baret Randel, Dan Golten, Steve 
Stibinskl. Tom Anderson. Graham Gangi. Third Row: Jeff Goodall. Jeremy Moen, Dave Dahlquist. Jason Martin. Jimmy Powell, Dan 
Verneisel. James Weyhenmeyer II. Mike Volgt. Fourth Row: Chris Wolter, Matt Peters. Doug Peterson. Luke Swanson, Matt GImpert. Dave 
Boltz, Chris Lugo, Nate Kaufman, Adam Poetzel. Fifth Row: Scott Russell, Jay Wright. Ben Caughey. Casey Wagner. 



Phi Kappa Tau 




O Phi Kappa Tau has 
members in many 
campus organiza- 
tions such as lUB, 
the IFC Judicial 
Board and various 
athletic teams. 

O They were the 
1995 Greek Week 
Champions with 
Sigma Delta Tau. 

O They work to bene 
fit many philan- 
thropies. These 
include the Adopt- 
a-School. 



Phi Kappa Tau: First Row: Tim Gannon. Greg Otsuka. Rudy Calderon, Derek Kozlowskl. Brian Ramsey, Mike Pfister. Jolin Cobb, T.J. Olson, Jim Boccarossa. Second Row: Jim Brubaker, Matt 
Blevins, Tony Antagnoli, Mike Harmsen, Matt Lee, Eric Sidle, Steve Byron, Marty Verbic, Dan Miller, Bill Cottrell. Mike PacholskI, Mike Szyplman. Third Row: VI Lam, Jim Milos, Mike Barth, 
Scott Larson, Brian Buckley, Jim Ammlrati, Chris Kochanowicz, Jason Smith, Tony Nowak, Eric Achtlen, Jason Relchert, Aaron Ratner. 






Phi Sigma Kappi 





I Y I V In J 




^hi Sigma Kappa: First Row: A. Bartlow, K. Whittlinger, M. DeVar, J. Keller, A. Frasca, J. Seguln. Second Row: T. Medaglia, C. Watson, M. 
Uueller, A. Parikh, E. Lewis, J. Wagner, L. Cabrera, V. Cheung. Third Row: A. Barnum, J. Frasca, L. Stowe, S. Hebert, S. Yamada, J. Jogmen. 

ourth Row: George Casey, B. McAleenan, J. Seibold, T. Sloth, T. Dodge. Fifth Row: P. Russo, J. Khazaeli, V. Fernandex, C. Smittl<amp, D. 

ool<. Sixth Row: D. Dillon, F. Vilarin, J. Eggstaff, M. Palac. Seventh Row: T. Moran, Darrik D., A. Kramer, J. Demirdjian, T. Calabrese, M. 
3aughman, T. Kapinus. 





O Phi Sigma Kappa 
elected two 
Intrafraternity 
Council Vice- 
Presidents in 
1995. 

O They were the 
1993-1994 intra- 
mural football 
champions 
(Fraternity 
Orange). 

O Phi Sigma Kappa's 
raise money for 
their philanthropy. 
It is the Matthew's 
House for 
Underprivileged 
Children Crisis 
Nursery. 

O They are a sponsor 
of the annual 
Malibu Beach 
Volleyball 
Tournament. 

O In 1992, 1993 and 
1994, Phi Sigma 
Kappa, held the 
title of intramural 
outdoor soccer 
champions. 



«^ 



Greeks 263 




iBeta 




Pi Beta Phi: First Row; T. Ryan, K. Weber, C. Kula, C. Miller, S. Slatten, J. Davies, S. Richards. J. Whitlow, S. Kempa, A. Veit, A. McGehie, E. Ferguson, J. McLaughlin. Second Row: L. Grzyb. K. 
Vahle, E. Rink, C. O'Keefe. C. Weeks. L. Michalski. G. Bane. K. Wiley. M. Diaz. B. Czalkowski. T. Kochanek. M. DuBois. Third Row: J. Cruitt, J. Castellli, A. Dye. K. Fin. A. Dvaro, J. Janis. K, 
Giunta, A. Maxwell, K, Matousek, S. Ruiz, E. Cibula. Fourth Row: K. Lasky, C. Moniotes, A. McKay, L. Kearney. J. Gilomer. K. Perrings. M. Peterson. D. Schindler. A. Brown. N. Horn, M, Marlowe. 
Fifth Row: M. Hazer. A. Moore, S. Dunton, J. Valbert, A. Martinez, S. Bell. Sixth Row: M. Heinz. M. Luby. A. Edwards. J. Hecimonich. H. Chapman. E. Teelucksingh. E. Beckman. A. Karuschek. C. 
Gutterudge. M. Wojcik, K, Hefron. B. Troeskin. Seventh Row: M. West. A. Dihos. R. Dietzler. S. Bishop. I. Sanderson, M. Goldstein. S. Guzik. B. Willi. A. Gibson. C. Cantwell, K. Jansen. S. 
Miller, E. Bishop. A. Floers, L. Silver, S. Cox, K, Isenhart, A. Stem, D. Markos. L. Amerin. A, Brey. B. Nardulli. M. Sehy. K. Smith. J. Kearney, A. Garanaglia. B.Magee. A. Garntano. J. Radovich. S. 
Bambule. J. Coutant. J. Larson. A. Burns. B. Frese, K. Wolfley, D, Zentmeyer. J. West. K. Hudson. J. Pursley. T. McGill, K. Rojham. M. Muellen, N, Kidd, A. Gibson. B. Hinchey. S. Klimes. S. Ozley, 
fJ firjrris, M. Mickey. A. Cook. A. Lee. A. Cagwood, K. Madoch, E. Hills, J. Purgear, C. Minor, W. Haaland, R. Roberts. K. Winker. J. Lee, D. McLaughlin, C. Andre.is Holiin, T. Gou. J. Reid. 





O National philan- 
thropy: Arrowment 
Settlement School 
and Links to 
Literacy. 

O Philanthropy Event: 
Arrowgames, 
Sports Tournament 
for men. 

O Pi Beta Phi is the 
first women's 
sorority established 
at Monmouth 
College, 
Monmouth, III. 

O The Illinois Zeta 
Chapter of Pi Beta 
Phi celebrated 100 
years at the 
University of Illinois 
in April 1995. 

O Pi Beta Phi was the 
second sorority to 
be established at 
the University of 
Illinois. 



li^"^Hl 



:ks 



265 




Phi Sigma Sigma 



% 



O Phi Sigma Sigma's 
Casino Niglit rais- 
es money to bene- 
fit the National 
Kidney Foundation. 

O The Theta Chapter 
is celebrating its 
72nd year at the U 
of I. 

O They have started 
a 4-week new 
member program. 





Phi Sigma Sigma: First Row: N. Albin, V. Szott, E. Slick, J. Glover, A. Forman, M. Segura, B. Rogers, L. Cheline, J. Holland. Second Row: V. Baldoza, S. Katcher. S. Barr, J. Cook. A. 
Hyenitsch. K, Lidmsky, C. Shatynsky, L. Huntington. Third Row: R. Sanchez, L. Barrios, A. Rice, A. Thulin, J. Calhoun, A. Haronik, H. Jenkins. Fourth Row: E. Egel. J. Lambert. M. 
Sehstedt, S. Rhodes, D. Phillips, K. Peters, L. Niemczewski, D. DeLaTorre, S. Duesterhaus, K. Nevius, A. Benson, H. Adcock, K. Deutschinann, S. Mundorff. 3. Lipnian. Fifth Row: S. 
Patel, J. O'Leary, S. Cook, G. Vondrak. E. O'Leary. N. Taets, B. Raymond, K. Sentman. J. Heap, K. Wendelken, C. Austiff, J. Pansa, M. Gillespie. Not Pictured: J. Cirrincione. S, 
Kfjwariaka. J, Pistorius. J. Kohnke. D. Aruldoss, M. Sims, M. Adcock, N. Kleefisch, J, Schwab, D. Russo. N. Haiiiid. T. Alton, N. Bodene, W. Fernando. B. Linhait, M. O'Doniiell. S. 
R/f,hlowsl'i. 



WIP 



i! 



Sigma Tau Gamma 




igma Tau Gamma: hist kuv. : l.i.ho biioitH, ijii:[) I iivfiii. ^c uii ^i.-iiiM. jiii iin, mm. i,.ni Ackerman, Jason Harms. Second Row, bi ott vviirms 
lyx Parker, Tommy Cornerio. Mark Denton, Dan Pawlak, Bryce Fuller, Brent Johnson, Jeremy Jurek, Scott Hoize, Andrew Silverstein, Brian 
'uigley. Third Row: Rob Abrams, Ryan Bassler, Marc Hedlund, Andy Flessner, Andy Voytko, Ed Higgins, James Urbaniec, Jeff Brueggeman, 
evin Brownell, Rob Walter, Matt Thai. 



O Sigma Tau Gamma 
was founded by 17 
friends who fought 
together in WWI. 
The Alpha Chi 
chapter has been 
established since 
May 9, 1953. 

O We host three par- 
ties called 
Atlantis, Jimmy 
Buffett/ Guns n' 
Roses fest and 
Orange Juice, co- 
hosted with Psi 
Upsilon. 

O Sig Taus do a 
"Pounds of 
Pennies" philan- 
thropy to benefit 
Swann Special 
Care Center. 

O We are very active 
on the campus and 
in the community. 
We have members 
in Starcouse, hos- 
pital volunteering, 
SGA, WPGU, Phi 
Gamma Nu and 
VIP. 

O Sig Taus excel aca- 
demically. They 
jumped 21 places 
in the fraternity 
GPA rankings. 



^^m 



Greeks 



267 




PhiMu 



P 



«•* 




i|f 



mi 




O Phi Mu held their 
annual tennis tour- 
nament in the 
spring to benefit 
their national phil- 
anthropy, The 
Children's Miracle 
Network. 

O This year, Phi Mu 
changed their 
pledge program 
from a semester to 
nine weeks. 

O The house partici- 
pates in workshops 
twice a month to 
increase aware- 
ness on fitness, 
safety and disabili- 
tites. 

O Nearly every mem- 
ber of Phi Mu is 
involved in an out- 
side organization. 

O During Greeks 
Make a Difference 
Week, Phi Mu along 
with Farmhouse vol- 
unteered for the 
Champaign Public 
Works. The house 
also volunteered 
time at the Swann 
Special Care 
Center. 



Phi Mu: First Row; B. Richards, M. Prodyma, K. Dunphy, A. Kretsclimer, K. Barrios, K. Duitsman. G. Montemayor, A. Wozniak, A. Storch. Second Row: K. Pedroza, V. Lechner, K. Zarno, B. 
Yacullo, C. Warp, J. Klepper. IVl. IVIcWuillan, S. Perkins, B. Radecki, S. Kanani. A. Mertens, J. Lyda, A. Spalding, L. Kobiica, H. Ploog. Third Row: T. Langer, S. Roupas, C. McDonough, S. Lyons. 
Fourth Row: J. Ahrling, S. IVIalec, L. Ward, K. Kok-Alblas, N. Reicheneker, E. Rosiak. IVl. Hollywood, K. Hammond, S. Chinn, T. Kerrigan. M. Chutipisalkul. Fifth Row: E. Hawker, A. Gregg. S. 
Thomson. M.Gaumer. J. Cramer. A. Bundt, T. Langer. S. Junkus. K. Gerald, J. Dewey, A. Travis, K. Bloemker, L. McNeal, K. Maack, L. Kush, E. McGrath. Sixth Row: K. Witheft. M. Weidemier, K. 
Mursu, J. Valdez, L. Adams, A. Pray, T. Jaminski, T. Millerick, N. Rockwood, J. Casolari, E. Gradford, L. Horvath. S. Rice. A. Tufano. S. Grohlich, A. Landeck, K. Seaman. Seventh Row: H. Waak, J. 
Homoly, S. Wisek. J. Williams. S. Jansen, J. Phillips, N. Anderson. 0. Bahadur. A. Thawani. M. Daly. K. Morris. M. Onstad, G. Chesley. Eight Row: P. Krish, L. Delapena, J. Kiesler, J. Leone. J. 
Griffin, S. Gupta, T. Kovach, B. Cram, E. Meyer, A. Zarno, R. Hitzelberger, W. Quinn. L. Feliman. K. Pilcher, L. Vivanco. Ninth Row: B. Hedger, J. Koszyk. L. Rice. L. Reczek. L. Szilva, L. Ryan, J. 
Hernandez, J. Earnest, A. Lechner, J. Buescher, C. Kwiecinski. 



y 



mtm^ 



Greeks 



269 



Sigma Kappa 




M 

j^^^-' 1 


-JjL '^ 






^i^ 


w , 




E ^1 


1 


ll ( 1 




V*^ ,<- ' 



^^FW 



K"a 






Sigma Kappa: First Row: Tanya Brooks, Theresa Robinson, Dana IVIavros, Heather Kuhn, Lisa Schmidt. Regan Wuttke, Dawn Reverts, 
Tracy Van Croenenbroeck, Marni Rivkin, Anne Marie Pontarelli, Alison Kehoe, Jen Gleich, Theresa Bolan, Mitun Gupta, Becky Pontarelli, 
Alicia Studinski. Melissa Duffey, Jaclyn White, Dori Stables, Natalie Camara, Jackie Sheridan, Alicia Stellhorn, Jodi Kaminecki, Terri 
Aung-Myint, Carrie Keane, Brenda Lattanzio, Jennifer Obalil, Susan Sim, Vennessa Singharuksa, Kara Webb, Heidi Nurnberg, Naomi 
Nakayama, Maureen Dore, Wendy Wiloughby, Tara Ekstrom, Amanda Kaiser, Beth Schierer, Susan Lash, Greta Peralta, Mimi Kang, 
Knsta Tapscott, Becky Karchmar, Anna Labowicz, Stephanie Nance, Shelley Friesz, Amie Megginson, Eric Naughton, Julie Grena, Jem 
Fox, Jen Van Winkle, Katie O'Connell, Lori Dulemba, Mindy Nuding, Patricia Gomez, Anna Damen, Jen Rice, JoAnne Pazderski, Sara 
Ellington, Kristi Page, Darci Stadler, Debbie Hannula, Nancy Janowiak, Karen Hroma, Amanda Rahn, Bndgette DeLeon, Sara Smiley, 
Jenny Morrell, Jen Hawkins, Cindy Dollman, Helen Chou, Allison Schnieder, Kelly Stamm. Jen Renner, Jen Cox, Tracy Victorine, Susan 
Hackett, Tiffany Vanderveide, Kelly, Kohlbacher, Keri Carter, Emily Combe, Amy Williams, Angle Haacke, Heathre Norris, Keri Kolososki, 
Jo-El Lacy, Jodi Fabre, Julie Chan, Rachel Gregg, Vicky Dabler, Tan Weicharding. 



J Sigma Kappa 
prides itself on its 
diversity and 
believes each 
member gives 
something unique 
to the sorority 
itself. 

O Each week at 
house meetings 
the women of 
Sigma Kappa have 
programs to bring 
awareness to the 
house. 

O For the second 
consecutive year, 
we entered a 
scholarship compe- 
tition with another 
sorority on cam- 
pus. 

O We also have inter- 
house competition 
with "Sigmas" and 
"Kappas". Each 
month the teams 
turn in their grades 
to get them posted 
in the violet patch. 

O Members of Sigma 
Kappa were also 
able to nominate 
their sisters for the 
"What a Woman" 
sisterhood award, 
given to a Sigmia 
Kappa who went 
above and beyond 
the call of duty. 



u 



Greeks 



271 




Triangle 



iw 




O Triangle is a nation- 
al fraternity for 
architects, engi- 
neers and scien- 
tists founded liere 
at the University of 
Illinois in 1907. 

O The fall semester 
social calendar 
included events like 
Bid Night with Phi 
Sigma Sigma. 

O We built the second 
place homecoming 
float with the 
women of Alpha 
Delta Pi, and will 
be doing Atius with 
Alpha Phi. 

O Along with acade- 
mics, Triangles are 
involved on campus 
through organiza- 
tions such as 
Dean's Student 
Advisory Committee, 
Engineering Council, 
Interfraternity 
Council and intra- 
mural athletics. 

O Our ongoing philan- 
throphy is Adopt-A- 
Highway on Daniel 
Street here in 
Champaign. 




wsm^g^Bssis^ 



Beta Theta Pi 



O Beta Theta Pi 
hosts Greek 
Olympics, a philan- 
thropy for Make-A- 
Wish foundation. 

O Betas host a post- 
Bid Night Bash 
with a live reggae 
band. 

O We hold a winter 
formal where we 
"pass the Loving 
Cup." 




[Beta Theta Pi Seniors: First Row: Brain Moran, Dave Tunstall, Paul Spilotro, Ryan Overtoom, John Richardson. Brian Brennan, Johnathan Schlossberg, Ian Patrick Kernan. Second Row: 
■lan Ebert, William Farnsworth. James Kunel. Matthew Minnerick, Matthew Branom, Ryan Scoville. Peter Monnacewlla. Ryan Esko, Mundo Cruz, Michael Vogel, James Nygaard. Richard 



r 



Greeks 



273 




Alpha Delta PI 




S.WARl eXCH/V 




274- Greeks 




O There are many 
aspects of Alpha 
Delta Pi that make 
it a unique sorority. 

O We encorage regu- 
lar visits by our 
members to the 
Ronald McDonald 
House, our philan- 
thropy. Alpha Delta 
Pi also participates 
in carolling at the 
Ronald McDonald 
House. 

O Alpha Delta Pi was 
the first sorority, 
both nationally and 
on the U of I cam- 
pus, to shorten 
and redesign their 
pledge program. 

O The Sigma chapter 
of Alpha Delta Pi 
uses the Total 
Membership 
Education (TME) 
program to 
increase the knowl- 
edge of all its 
members on vari- 
ous issues. 

O We pride ourselves 
on the diversity of 
our members. 
Members belong to 
many different 
organizations. 



Alpha Delta PI: First Row: T. Stergulz. T. Storm. K. Linett, S. Zuiker, A. Shain, S. Miller, H. Cliff, L. Pocius, E. Cody, P. Riordan, R. Kreiger. M. Skrysak, L. Moore, K. Kiss, H. Anderson, S. Ozier, 
C. Wilson. Second Row: K. Hilton, K. Wycykal, N. Silvoski, A. Hall, M. Perry, A. Miller, B. Beaupre, L. Freeman, L. Matlock, N. toggle, R. Stoner, T. Pilkaitis. S. VIeweg. K. Wray, K. Piotrowicz, T. 
Miller, L. Gangwish, C. Smith, E. Tucker, J. Chang. L. Kumar. A. Hann. S. Ballard. L. Rachowitz. Third Row: H. Aeschelman. L. McGrath. J. Ayers. C. Meisinger, L. Knittle. E. McCoy, G. Loccasio. K. 
Given, M. Murphy. L. Anderson. T. Buedel. C. O'Melia. E. Rehn, S. Young. S. Hallberg, S. Duke. B. O'Neil. C. Lustfeldt, L. Erans. C. Dorsey, J. Korte. J. Vallone. L. DeHann. Fourth Row: L. Nelson, 
H. Winkleman, D. Brehart, C. Friedline, E. Lotz, L. Sweet, M. Gannon, J. Lewis, K. Strang, A. Knutson. K. Pettijohn. K. Ruth, J. Kreutzer, M. Peterson, L. Shepard. Fifth Row: K. Getz. M. Dekoj. 
M.Moehring. M. Fliss, S. Kemmis. J. Stauss. A. Prechtel, A. Hasler, J. Faris, P. Hulling, C. Swartzfager. J. Kiaschko. M. Tarter. J. Wirtz. S. Arnold, K. Stergulz, K. Hui. Sixth Row: J. Edmonson. R. 
Neilson. C. Cash. N. Herman. P. Schrieffer. J. Winkleman. A. Bunte. C. Liter. S. Mulder. N. Baranauskas. C. Chapman, L. Suthers, J. Cox, L. Schmidt, N.Tempia, E. Welsh. 



GREEKS 



275 



Koinonia and 
Stratford House 



Koinonia and Stratford House are self-governing, interdenominational residences sponsored by the Baptist 

Student Foundation. 

They are located at 308 and 312 E. Daniel St. in Champaign. 

Preparing meals, cleaning and other household responsibilities are shared by the members of each house, result 

ing in a lower cost of living. 

"Koin", for men, and "Strat", for women, encourage Christian fellowship and growth through a diverse Christian 

environment. 

Koinonia: First Row: Scott Andrews, Scott 

Lee, Andrew Cox, Michael Fox. Second 

Row: Joshua Parker, Jay Edwards, Jeff 

Visser, Ryan Youngblood. Third Row: 

Jonathon Pickell, Todd Swingley, James 

Oliver. Fourth Row: Warren Raquel, P.J. 

Sweders, Isaac Wofford, Geoff Nelson, 

Wesley Broquard. Fifth Row: John Brody, 

Jeff McKeown, Paul Pritts, Ryan Daulton. 

Sixth Row: Brent Westermeyer, Ted Rounds, 

Jen Ramsey, David Sowers. Last Row: Mark 

Maenche, Brooks Shull, Andrew Parker, 

Scott Bamson, Andrew Weaver. Not 

Pictured: Darin Kennelly, Steven Konstanty, 

Derek Maning, Drew Marana, Charles 

Theivagt, Jeff Thornton. 



I 




Stratford House: 

First Row: Aymee 
Clever, Amy Palmer, 
Kristen Gilstrap, 
Annmarie Ewald, Kari 
Mahannah, Jill Einfelt, 
Michelle Massey, 
Kristin Ferry. Second 
Row: Janet Witter, 
Taryn Orpet, Maureen 
Mojica, Kristi Scott, 
Jennifer Carter, Lesley 
Fewkes, Leigh Ann 
Skinner (house advi- 
sor), Erin Murphy, 
Rebecca Barrick, 
Christine Craig. Third 
Row: Lynd.sey Daniel, 
Maureen Rounds, 
Kelly Busby, Jindalle 
Beeck, Amy Keefe, 
AlLson Gib. Fourth 
Row: Amy Lundquist, 
Su.san Han.son, Amy 
(Cameron, Hlissa 
Peppers, Katie 
Farn.sworth. Not 
Pictured: Tanya 
Maybcrry and Niki 
Sperry 




276 



Organizations 



Presby House 



Presby House provides university certified housing for 40 women at the U of I. It is located at 405 E. John. 
The women of Presby come from diverse backgrounds and have a variety of majors. 

Our House Mom, Velda Freehill, was Assistant Program Director at lUSA, worked with campus activites, the 
Illinettes and the First Year Impact Program for Freshman. 

Our members are actively involved in intramural sports, campus clubs, community service organizations and var- 
ious fraternitites, as well as a formal and a barndance every year. 

Presby House: First Row: Shawn Hembrough, Dawn 
Strunk, Vekla Freehill, Katie O'Neill, Sasha Thompson. 
Second Row: Jill Stoller, Julie Meyer, Tanya Ashur, Beth Orr, 
Kelly Gaba, Natasha Klein, Bianca Turner. Third Row: 
Candace Juliusson, Tammy Hiler, Michelle Dewan, Jamie 
Addington, Amy Doll, DeeAnn Schaley, Mica Lerner. Fourth 
Row: Gwendolyn Smith, Christy Jones, Dana Renken, Angle 
Harms, Karyn Dum, Dristi Delheimer. Fifth Row: Colleen 
Strunk, Lisa Gillett, Jessy Salzman, Kate Lemon, Mindy 
Davidson, Jenelle Johnson. Sixth Row: Gwen Geistler, 
Amanda Falk, Rebecca Royer, Jenny Hale, Niki Flowers, 
Susan Brown, Christal Smith. Not Pictured: Jodi Goebel, Jodi 
Grimes, Karen Riden, Rachael Wamsley. 




Chi Epsilon 



' Chi Epsilon is the National Civil Engineering Honor Society, founded at the U of I in the Spring of 1922. 

' We are dedicated to maintaining and promoting the status of civil engineering as an ideal profession. 

' Initiation distinguishes the student of civil engineering who exemplifies the qualities of scholarship, character, 

practicality and sociability. 

' Chi Epsilon members have the responsibility of extraordinary service in the advancement of their profession. 
' There are currently 116 chapters of Chi Epsilon in the United States which have initiated more than 72,600 members. 

Chi Epsilon: First Row: 
Greg Koch, Jon Schmidt, 
Victor Van Santen, 
Anthony Aniello, Brian 
Hackman. Second Row: 
Prof. Sharon Wood (advi- 
sor). Matt Sudduth, Jerry 
King, Mike Wieczorek, 
Darci Black, Sanjay Joshi. 




ORGANIZATIONS 



277 




Delta Delta Delta 



O Tri Delts was 
founded on 
Thanksgiving Eve 
in 1888 at Boston 
University and 
came to U of I in 
1920. 

O From SAA and 
clneerleading to 
club and intramural 
sports, Tri Delts 
can be seen partic- 
ipating in a number 
of campus activi- 
ties. Tri Delts 
strive to get 
involved with the 
university and in 
the community. 

O Our philanthropy, 
Frats at Bat, was a 
success again this 
year where we 
raised money for 
St. Judes 

Children's Hospital 
for cancer 
research. 

O Whether its study- 
ing, watching TV 
or going to the 
local hangouts, Tri 
Delts enjoy being 
together and main- 
taining close sis- 
terhood. 



Delta Delta Delta: First Row: L. Steinberg, J. Miller, J. Daike, T. Veluz, L. Dodds. M. Soldwedel, F. Bruno. M. Foley, C. Adams, F. Winegar, T. Hnadley, K. Stuclily, C. Petty, E. McNally, R. 
Scully. M. Young. Second Row: T. Tracy. T. Hsabalis. T. Rowe. A. Fowler, S. Memaster. K. McDonald. M. Seehafer, A. Delniore, J. Jackson. J. Lee. J. Miler. K, Anderson, M. Soer. S. 
Batchellor. M. McLaughlin, T, Epperson. Third Row: Q. Hentzel, 0. Mezei. C. Neville. A. Sims. J. Schlossberg, J. Schultz. S. Davis. C. Rolls. J. Patt. M. Totel. M. Berarde. K. Phair. G. Risatti. 
S. Klintworth. N. Ransom, B. Sallman, K. Glennon, S. Lin. M. Young, L. Lukasik. K. Tarzon. Fourth Row: J. Boston, C. Collins, N. Lizio. N. Hunt. L. Auguis. J. Antonini. A, Coffman. T. 
Wertheim. K. Garr, A. Frett, J. Shin, L. Assmus, K. Lorenz, K. Smithson, K. Henwood, J. Turner, L. Alberts, B. Biondo, T. Klayman, M. Frost. Fifth Row: B, Arana. J. Venton. K. Epperson, A. 
Clark, K. Cox, L. Hill, C. Bishop, J. Marble, C. Teeple. A. Mendoza. Sixth Row: N. O'Hara. R. Privette, L. Kemnar. D. Rowden, K. Bednarz, J. Jodlowski. M. Ackernian. L. Zerbe. A. Lorden. L. 
Batchellor, K. Cote, M. King, H. Knudson. J. Ippolito. N. Wilson. J. Bobe, W. Moyers, J. Walkington, K. Anderson, M. Sieben. Sixth Row: J. Engelson. C. Biancalana, M. Cook, K. Butts. A, 
Huston, H. Turacek, A, Soer, A. Bartkowicz, T. McNally, S. Beckman, D. Hannah, S. Roberts. A. Mullarkey. Eighth Row: J. James, S. Tutoky. K. Ripley, S. Rusoneles. A. Bulfasky, A. Hill. S. 
WnRlny, S. Leopold. S. Durham, P. Rabe. K. Schmitt. ). Nelson. P. laverty, H. Parmelee, J. Kurth, 

?.~'S Greeks 



Zeta Psi 




O Zeta Psi is the fra- 
ternity of mini foot- 
ball legend Harold 
"Red" Grange. 

O The Alpha Epsilon 
chapter, here at 
the U of I, owns 
one of three death- 
masks of Abraham 
Lincoln. 

O While in our fourth 
year of re-estab- 
lishment, we are 
proud of our her- 
itage at the U of I 
dating back to 
1909. 

O Zeta Psi is the 
only fraterntiy with 
a chapter at every 
Ivy League school 
and at every Big 
Ten school. 

O Founded in 1847, 
Zeta Psi ranks as 
the 11th oldest 
greek letter frater- 
nity. 

O Our nickname is 
Zetes, our colors 
are white and gold 
and our symbol is 
the Tasmanian 
Devil. 



Zeta Psi: First Row: Matt Elwood. Mike Harshbarger, Matt Sudduth, Chris Czarnoski, Mike Jones. Second Row; Tony Zeffiro, 
Nate Brammeier, Colton Anderson, Ryan Ely, Neal Kleemann, Ron Gelger, Chris Hendricks. Third Row: Ben Jackels, Stephen 
Ibendahl, Paul Richardson, Greg Bernosky. Mike Clark, Jim Hastings, Darren Forgy, Mark Hulin, Tom Wallisch. Not Pictured: 
Mike Clark, Paul Richardson. 



Greeks 



279 



k>Ai 



■XC 




Acacia 



O Acacia delivers 
food to a battered 
women's shelter on 
a weekly basis. 

O They have won 
awards from nation- 
al fraternity for 
membership 
growth. 



n 







O Alpha Delta Phi 
takes pride in tradi- 
tion and brother- 
hood. 

O They host the annu- 
al Moosehead and 
Trip'N Fall parties. 

O Alpha Delta's have 
many prestigious 
alumni that are still 
dedicated to the 
chapter. 

O Alpha Delta Phi par- 
ticipate in strong 
intramural athletic 
teams. 



rjhn mi ^ 



Acacia: First Row: Kevin Shea, Mike Waisln. Casey Hunt. Jeremy Coleman, Josh Schwede, Ian Cull, Wade Challacombe, Tim 
Pearson, Mike Conniff, Patrick Owens, Jess Waldeck, Michael Broms. Second Row: Brent Strombom, Ryan Kennedy, Dave 
Dielicz, Adam Picchietti. Jan Morel. Tim Thompson, Norm Rivera, Mark Worman, Matt Gardner. Jon Branham. Jay Delfin. Mark 
Lodwick. Matt Carmody. Third Row: Devin Huber. Brian Anderson, Brad Wiemerslage, Dan St. Martin, Chad Sellman, Matt 
Kelley, Chris Jackson, Dave Jennings, Joe Wahler, Paul Jacobsen, Omar Morcos. Jay Rodgers, Jason Busboom. Fourth Row: 
George Haenisch, Ryan Flach, Marcus Samaan, Joel Busboom, Mike McEldowney, Terry Singla. Mike DeLeonardis. Aaron Barr. 
Andy Justice. Grant Cain, Andy Fiester, Mike Hubbard. Leo Mendia. 



Alpha Delta Phi 




^'d,0 



GREEKS 



m^y^:. 



Alpha Rho Chi 




Alpha Rho Chi: First Row: Charles G. Morley, Pamela J. Brown, Rebekah L. Stech, Elissa F. Schneider. Erica K. Franke, Susan 
D. Presser. Christine E. Walker, Brian J. Plath, Valerie L. Ruester, Robert E. Lee. Second Row: Robert P. Zuber, Marc W. 
Roberts, Gary A. RogowskI, Kristlne L. Lambo, Laura E. Schmidt, Erica A. Techelra. Sharl A. Klepper, Molly K. Hogan, B. Gall 
Jacala, Charles J. Pickard, Gregory S. Pelley. Third Row: Jeremy L. Oberc, Charles J. Stahl, Mike L. Ward, Travis T. Brimner, 
Kevin W. Teague, Phillip A. Blecker. Henry H. Hill. Michael P. Thieme. Steven Kiss, Douglas R. Lockwood. Not Pictured: 
Manuel Cantu, Ryan E. Fox, Rendy S. Nelson, Christopher Requena, David K. Warfel, Dawson V. Weber. Susan Whitwell. 



Delta Phi 




L Delta Phi: First Row: Jason A. Etherldge, Ken L. Schwartz, Shane M. Markin, Christopher A. Moomey, Adam D. Behnke, Jonathan M. 
DeFiebre, Stanley J. Gee. Second Row: Thananaun Charlya, David L. Browning, Jason S. White, Joel A. Stevenson, Christopher J. 
r -— 



r 



O Alpha Rho Chi is a 
national 

social/professional 
fraternity for archi- 
tecture and the 
applied arts. 

O It is coed, current- 
ly with 33 active 
members in the 
Anthemios, U of I 
chapter. 

O Founded in 1914, 
at the Universtiy of 
Illinois it is located 
at 1108 S. First 
St. in Champaign. 

O It includes faculty 
and honorary mem- 
bers on campus. 




O Delta Phi is the 
oldest active 
social fraternity 
started in 1872. 

O We were founded 
upon brotherhood, 
truth, and morality. 

O Delta Phi is cele- 
brating our 75th 
Anniversary at U of 
I this year. 

O We are strict on a 
no hazing policy. 

O Delta Phi is also 
known as St. 
Elmo's of Illinois. 



Greeks 



281 



I 




Theta Chi 



'/.•'. 
M 






^*-;-; 



O Theta Chi is an 
absolutely no haz- 
ing fraternity and 
vows to never haze 
a member. 

O Our maxim is 
"Alma Mater First, 
and Theta Chi for 
Alma Mater." 

O We believe in offer- 
ing a helping hand 
to all who seek it, 
holding philan- 
thropies each 
semester to bene- 
fit the community 
including a haunt- 
ed house to benefit 
Cunningham 
Children's Home. 

O Theta Chi members 
are leaders in 
numerous campus 
organizaitons. 

O Theta Chi members 
occupy the second 
largest Greek 
house on campus. 



n 



Theta Chi: First Row: Joseph Elarde, Brian Pozen, Joel Brown, David HIadik, Thomas Thompson. Drew Kofahl, David Bechtel. Second Row: Justin Breen, David Wang. Nick Shin. Nicholas 
Klensch, Darrel Goeddel. Jose Ruiz. Andrew Ryback, Brian Gantwerker. Brent Bailey, Daniel Bechtel. Eric Fink, Steven Jacob. Third Row: Hal Gallimore. Steve Bitakls. Dan Aboutar. Jay 
Rangan. Nicholas Keil. Kevin Gurgel, Gregory Materna. Michael Hartter, Christopher Plack. Brent Rudin. Fourth Row: Jeremiah Aultz. Jason Blazler. Brian Williams. Ormar Ortiz. Karl 
Hamond. Ron Bednar. Mark Lobos, Brad Persson. Jason Ayeroff, Francisco Palao-Ricketts. Kevin Snyder. Wayne Milczarek. Not Pictured: Jason Arndt. John Burks. Stevan Brasel. Frank 
Frydrych. Sascha Illy. Shamus Regan. Geoff Skyles. 



282 



Greeks 



Farmhouse 





O Farmhouse fraterni- 
ty is striving for 
execellence in aca- 
demics. We never 
forget the main rea- 
son why we are at 
the University of 
Illinois. 

O Our fraternity focus- 
es on professional 
career preparation 
as well as social 
activities. 

O Farmhouse is 
founded on a 
strong united broth- 
erhood that new 
members constant- 
ly try to uphold. 

O We are constantly 
striving for spiritual 
growth. 

O Farmhouse is a 
builder of men. 



Farmhouse: First Row: Matt Lloyd, Tim Peters. Phil Helsner, Bill Bodine. Eric Croft. Mark Mosbarger. Tim Meis. Second Row: Matt Helms. Travis DeClerl<. Brian Lehn. Andy Riggins. Wade 
Pollit. John Gill. Third Row: Ted Meis. Dave Grube. Todd West. Steve Doyle. Allyn Buhrow. Ben Rosczyk, Andy Jenks. Steve Kramer. Jeff Nelson. Brian Deverman. Fourth Row: Chris Erickson. 
Matt Wolf, Ryan Tate. Kent Ficklin. Doug Hensley, Tim Stock. Fifth Row: Gary Sierens, Chad Sager. Nathan Rosczyk. Matt Hennefent. Brian King. Matthew Knight. Chris Stortzum. Sixth 
Row: Brian Rolf. Brent Sulzberger. Craig Watters. Josh Rhodes. Dan Parker. Ben Hawkinson. Seventh Row: Brad Drusa. Aaron Bartlow. Jason Smith, Roy Robinson, Mark Garwood, Mark 
Rubinson. Eighth Row: Zach Belton, Jeremy Edwards. Joe Webel. Chad Hensley. Joe Springer. Lyie Basboom, Craig Sims, Aaron Wilken. Tom Conklin. Doyle Dettro. 



GREEKS 



283 




O Kappa Delta Rho 

was named Most 
Outstanding New 
Donor Group by the 
Community Blood 
Service of Illinois. 

O Our annual bike 
race benefits the 
Developmental 
Services Center. 



O Nabor House is 
dedicated to agri- 
cultural education, 
cooperation and 
recreation. 

O This year, the 
Nabor House 
Fraternity has 38 
members. 

O We are dedicated 
to the develop- 
ment of campus 
wide leaders. 

O The members of 
Nabor House 
Fraternity are 
devoted to cooper- 
ative living. 



Kappa Delta Rho 




Kappa Delta Rho: First Row: Kirk L. Fitpold, Josepli A. Stefanski, Norm Murrin, Andrew P. Bessette, Adam D. Melton. Michael J. 
Cabage, Keith Meister, Martin J. Landauer, Darshan Patel. Second Row: Christopher Mueller, Sean McDonald, Ryan B. Hall, 
David W. Hurter, Brian S. Faulkner, Kevin W. Beth, Mark A. Phillips, Walter S. Burns, Benjamin Wood, Peter B. Roberts, James R. 
Cameron, Paul F. Klaus, Daniel Jaworski, David A. Johnson, John A. Klein, Brian Althoff, J. Maggio. 



Nabor House 




Nabor House Fraternity: First Row: Todd Bradshaw, Kevin Eathington, Noah Litherland, Matt Kellopp. Trent Uphoff, Chad 
Fciller. Second Row: Jonathon Aaltonen, John Rutherford, Brian Carlson, Jason Tompkins, Justin Moffitt, Craig Heisner, Jason 
Propst. Third Row: Wade Smith, Heath McCormick, Adam Anderson, Greg Hart, Jason Hoult, Matt Powell, Shawn McKim. 
Fourth Row: Ryan Wilson, Tim Boerma, Matt Hempstead, John Lane, Darin Sterenberg, Don Wall. Fifth Row: David 
Gerstenecker, John Prater, Paul Mann. Barry Sampson. Jeff Duncan. Michael Potthast, David Schneider, Mark Mohi. 



284 



GRE.EKS 



«wa^aMBa. 



Sigma Delta Tau 



\i/ 




Sigma Delta Tau Seniors: First Row: Amy Cantor, Dana Friedman, Amanda Zoloto, Stacy Hillman, Brenda Schaffer. Second 
Row: Bonnie Turek, Melissa Lezak, Joann Reed, Lauren Sherman, Lisa Handler. Jennifer Garson. Jill Denenberg. Stacy Walter. 
Third Row: Alissa Shandling. Valerie Cohen, Susan Milsk, Heather Capouch. Not pictured: Rachel Borak, Amy Genender, 
Kimberly Gerstein, Debl Ketay, Taryn Lang, Renee Lewis, Karyn Miller, Julie Nadler. Leslie Portnoy, Rebecca Ruben, JodI 
Schaffner, Sandi Sprechman, Alison Talbert. 




V EL 




Sigma Lambwda Beta: First Row: Dennis J. Rizo, German A. Acosta. Seond Row: Jose Lopez, Marcelino Ireta. 
Anselmo Rosa. Joel Krettek. Third Row: Gllberto Medina, Jaime Tello, Saul Marchan. Not Pictured: Oscar Argueta, 
Reynaldo Nunez, Gilgardo Magana, Ricardo Quintero, Cesar Barradas, Miguel Hernandez, Ismael Reyna. Miguel 
Gonzalez, Russbel Rivera. Fernando Morales. Mark Martinez. Ramiro Arroyo. 




O Sisterhood 

O Scholarship 

O High community 
and organizational 
involvement. 



Sigma Lambda Beta 



O Founded nationally 
in 1986 at the 
University of Iowa, 
as a predominately 
Latino fraternity. 

O We are dedicated 
to the cultivation 
of honorable friend- 
ships. 

O We work to spread 
the rich culture we 
all share, through 
community service 
during and after 
college. 

O "Opportunity for 
wisdom, wisdom 
for culture" is our 
motto. 

O We constantly 
work toward the 
advancement and 
potential of intel- 
lectual excellence. 



Greeks 



285 



il 



Pi Kappa Alpha 




MilliiiiriTifiii'iiii Ill 




O Pi Kappa Alpha 
excels in every 
aspect of Greek life. 

O Known as Pikes, its 
nnembers share one 
quality, the never 
ending drive to be 
number one. 

O Whether in the 
classroom or on the 
athletic field. Pi 
Kappa Alpha gives 
a commmitment to 
excellence that has 
brought it success 
time and time 
again. 

O This year we 
enjoyed exchanges 
with women of Chi 
Omega, Delta Delta 
Delta and had 
Octoberfest with 
Alpha Chi Omega. 

O This year, the Pi 
Kappa Alpha frater- 
nity continued its 
tradition as one of 
the U of I's 
strongest fraternti- 
ies. Joining a 
Fraternity is a once 
in a lifetime experi- 
ence. That experi- 
ence becomes even 
more special with 
Pikes. 



Pi Kappa Alpha: First Row; Jeff Rajski, Michael Dannenfelt, Jason Helis, Matthew Palcer. Second Row: Michael Ekiund. Nick Leroy, Paul 
Matusiak, Eric Williams, Jerry Cameron, Todd Ofelnlock, Jason Uloswich, Third Row: Greg Rounds, Matt Ehlers, Pat McDermott, John 
Stanovich, Michael Meyers. Fourth Row: Leonard Epelbaum, Greg Karawan, Paul Kaczmarczyk. James Sinclair, David Olsen, Brian Rost, 
Mark Fournier. Fifth Row: Mike Fournier, Donald Sanders, Gary Mitchell, Adam Robinson, JT Johns, Brett Langefeld. Sixth Row: Aaron 
Bowman, Kyle Horn, Richard Benson, Michael Leguizamon, Brian Irwin, John Bryer, Eric Joyce, Matt Anderson, Billy Gelbuda. 



Greeks 



287 



II 




Pi Lambda Phi 



■■im 



O Pi Lambda Phi has 
had the number 
one GPA for the 
last nine out of 11 
semesters. 

O They were the win- 
ners of the Orange 
division of Greek 
Week in 1995. 

O Pi Lambda Phi 
hosts annual Super 
Sloppy Double 
Dare as a 
Philanthropy to 
benefit the 
American Cancer 
Society. 

O Their members 
truly feel that 
becoming a Pi 
Lambda Phi lasts, 
"Not four years, 
but a lifetime." 



Greeks 



M^s^sasak, 



Tau Epsilon Phi 




O Tau Epsilon Phi is 
one of the oldest 
chapter houses on 
campus and in the 
nation. 

O The Illinois chapter 
is recognized 
nationally as one 
of the top houses. 

O Tau Epsilon Phi has 
an annual all- 
weather Softball 
tournament to ben- 
efit our national 
philanthropy, the 
Diabetes 
Foundation. 

O They throw a holi- 
day party with a 
sorority to benefit 
local organizations 
such as Matthew's 
House and home- 
less shelters. 

O Tau Epsilon Phi has 
won Fraternity 
Orange 

Championships in 
Volleyball, Softball, 
Soccer and Co-rec 
Softball with Phi 
Mu. 



Tau Epsilon Phi: First Row: Christopher Dupuis, Wes Gonzalez, John Englehardt, Jeff Eniight. Dave Janicek, Brian LaDuca, Sean Koebl. 
Gregg Cunningham. Second Row: Joseph Lee, Aaron Wellington, Adam Kaur, Mike Bishop, Dave Wyent, Mark Lanie, Adam Toosley, 
Scott Kennedy, Mark Jodlowski, Yong Yi. Third Row: Ryan Lach-Seiple, Terry Moros, Matthew Jordan, David Barta, James McMahon, 
Eric Dvorachek, Timothy Fischer, Jason Stuber, Carl Podvika, Justin Wrzesinski, Joseph Vladika. Fourth Row: Marc Dupuis, Michael 
Tecson, Steven Curran, Regan Rybarczyk, Timothy Wright, Benjamin Bresnick, Aaron Link, Matthew Thomas, Jason Wagner. 



Greeks 



289 



II 




! 



f 



O Phi Delta Theta is 
the largest inter- 
national fraternity. 

O We have a long 
tradition of pride 
and brotherhood. 

O Our chapter was 
founded in 1893. 




. I 



Phi Delta Theta 




O Sigma Lambda 
Gamma is a latina- 
based sorority. 

O Concerned with 
promoting stan- 
dards of excel- 
lence in morality, 
ethics, and edu- 
caiton. 

O We work to better 
serve the needs 
and wants of all 
people by dissemi- 
nating information 
about the diverse 
cultures which we 
all share. 

O We have strong 
community ser- 
vice background. 
In 1994, the TRIO 
Program became 
our national phil- 
anthropy. 



Phi Delta Theta: First Row: J. Uemura. S. Hartman, M. Sullivan. D. McCaffrey, Dave Noonan, Kevin Jones, Tony Millar, Tom 
Nelson. Second Row: Brian Corry, Chris Gallivan, Mike Rockelmann, Lou Geurrini, Matt Beverly, Lazar Bityou, Brian Yeaman, 
Jim Conners, Jim Dimmick. Third Row: Brett Hochmuth, Brian Kuchnicki, Jeremy Meek, Brian Halstead, Charles Noback, Ken 
Nichols, Greg Richart, Matt Pagoria, Matt Leii. Fourth Row: Eric Dankoski, Drew Lee, Eugene Park, Robert Padilla, Jesse 
Seidman, Craig Smaha, John Kritenbrink, Kevin Coleman, Tony Soong, Brian Dooley, Jay Camp, Shane Foley, Craig Beachler. 
Sixth Row: John Mitts, Paul Justice, Chris Warner, Eric Wippo, Matt Stegan, Jeff Enstrom, Jeff Paris, Kent Stoner. 



Sigma Lambda Gamma 




Sigma Lambda Gamma Sorority Inc.: First Row: Martha Borow, Vanessa Haro, Yahna Awazu, Ana Cortez. Second Row: Ester 
Cabrales, Ana Santana, Fabiola Flores, Lily Jimenez, Joy Watkins, Teresa Nazario, Elizabeth Fernandez. Third Row: Lizette Rivera, 
Melissa Garcia, Danielle Landron, Ennedy D. Rivera, Annissa K. Aguilar. Fourth Row: Lizdelia Flores, Cecilia Abundis, Oralia 
Gomez, Leticia Nache, Cintia Ortiz. Not Pictured: Rita A, Hinojosn, Eliznhcth Pichardok. Yesenia Villnsenor, Letina Znvnin. 



290 



Greeks 



■joOusaiamu. 



Psi Upsilon 




Psi Upsilon: First Row: Matt Javenshad. John Westerhoff. Chris Lawrence, Mike Kiesowitch, Jordan Zimberoff, Doug Barnes, 
Tom Fisher, Gil Herrera. Second Row: Mike Orsi. Matt Mattila, Boug Britten, Jeff Wierer, Matt Wienke. Garth Wemmer, Chad 
House, Steve Kirtzic. Jeremy Youngren. Third Row: Matt Plavcan, Andy Britton, David Youngdahi, Kit Strieker, Paul Repmann, 
John Nelson. Ben Koszur, Jeff Watt, Mike Han. Fourth Row: Wess Tomczyk, Matt Wolski, John Parashos, Cam Kennedy, Shawn 
Aquino. Mark Christian. Andy Kovacevich. Demetrios Touzious, Adam Boydo. Not Pictured: Mike Trakselis, Will Haning, Eric 
McVey, Tom Doesnitz, Demetrios Georgacopolous, Jason Borucki. Chirs Tierney. 



Sigma Pi 





Sigma Pi: First Row: A. Frobish, T. Foster, B. Cassens, A. Amin, A. Miller, D, Kinney. A. Huizenga. M, Sterzinger, K. Urave. Second 
Row: K. Meyers. C. Godar, N. Stokes, M. Alip, H. Alitto, P. Bruns. Third Row: S. Yohannon, J. Oh, M. Collins. H, Jass, P. Copper. D. 
Alip, T. Ingles, A. Yang, R, Parker, Fourth Row: R. Stump, D. T. Brown, B, Ruoti, K.O.D, Henson. T, Angle, D. Toles, M. Cox. 



a 



O Psi Upsilon was 
founded in 1833 at 
Union College in 
New York 

O We've been at U of 
I since 1910. 

O Psi Upsilon's colors 
are garnet and 
gold. 



1_ 




O Sigma Pi offers a 
diverse brotherhood 
where members are 
encouraged to 
become involved 
with the campus. 

O And fun? You've 
never had so much 
fun in your life. 

O Brothers partici- 
pate in a number of 
intramural sports. 

O The Illinois chapter 
of Sigma Pi is 
proud to be the old- 
est continual chap- 
ter of Sigma Pi 
International. 



Greeks 



291 







Phi Kappa Sigma 



O Phi Kappa Sigma is 
nicknamed 
"Skulls," a tradi- 
tion dating back to 
the Civil War. 

O The Brothers of Phi 
Kappa Sigma strive 
for excellence in 
areas of acade- 
mics, athletics and 
philanthropy. 

O The Rho Chapter 
was founded on 
Oct. 29, 1892. 





rt^ 



-> 3Z 



Phi Kappa Sigma: First Row: Dmitry Kramarow, David Heitman. Patrick O'Neal, Aaron Reilly. Chad Herrrnan, Brian Kotowski. Craig Baloiin. Second Row: Brian Bederka. 
Duane Giorgetti, Joe Leddy, Chris Borbas. Eric Ryan, Neil Lakomiak. Bryce Austin, John O'Connell, Third Row: Jeremy Grohermg. Jeff Kreyer. Mark Nagle, Kevin Kuhn. Robert 
Hoekstra, Michael Benoit, Michael Smejkal, Ben Taylor, Dustin Zubert, Kevin Bass, Jason Williamson. Fourth Row: Peter Lynch, Rob Willis, David Bein, Mike Grisolano, Jack 
Sheehan, Cameron Wicklow, Greg Trusk. Fifth Row: Jeff Baloun. Mark Haraniija, Dan Delaunois, Richard Arroyo, Mark S/czepkowskl, Robert A, Ley. 



Greeks 



■i66mu^ 



Phi Kappa Psi 




Kappa Psi Seniors: First Row: C.J. Regan, Gino Campanelll, Scott Gifford. Second Row: Dan Barry, Pat Daley, Jim Keane, Sean O'Reilly, 
;v1att Sullivan, Craig Howard, James Krzemmski, Bill Metes, Mike Wagner, Matt Hammel, Pat Byrnes, Doug Richards, Mike France, Brian 
i.Vlonohan, Dan Emrlch. 





O At Phi Kappa Psi 
our strong empha- 
sis on academics 
has been further 
aided by the addi- 
tion of new com- 
puters to our study 
room. 

O Our alumni showed 
outstanding suport 
with a large 
Homecoming 
turnout and gener- 
ous donations 
toward our renova- 
tion project of our 
nearly 100 year old 
house. 

O Commitment to the 
community is also 
important to Phi 
Kappa Psi. We 
have many annual 
events for youth 
and elderly organi- 
zations. 

O For our parties, we 
often host well 
known local and 
Chicago bands for 
live entertainment. 

O We like to hang 
out on our porch, 
admiring our new 
lawn. 



Piji Kappa Psi: First Row: Pat Daley, Matt Sullivan, Josh Bales, Raj Batra, Jeremy Wenthe. Second Row: Brian Boyd, Kit Mackie, Mike Skoglund, Nate 
McGowan, Kevin Montague, Dave Johns, Craig Howard, Mike Wagner, Doug Richards, Jason Cowles, Sean Nottingham. Third Row: Ryan Evans, Dan Barry, 
Dan Emrlch, Bill Metes, Pat Byrnes, Mike France, Matt Hammel, Brian Monohan, Dan Beedon. Fourth Row: Martin Kelly, Jason Napolitano, Jared Scott, Ken 
Warzynski, Mike Stare, Tony Abbott, GIno Campanelll, Gavin Klaus, Pat Keenan, Scott Gifford, Adam Arling, James KrzeminskI, C.J. Regan, Joe Boyd, Steve 
Casper, Matt Daley, Chris Weddlge, Ryan Keegan, Sean O'Reilly. Fifth Row: Steve NIckas, Mike Kelly, Jason Heidkamp, Nick Togas, Aldo Aranda, Mike 
Palmer, Greg Macias, Steve Doench, Mike Voipe, Andy Hronek, Greg Weber, Andy Lynch, Dave Rooney, Otto Miller, Jim Keane, John Spiggos, Matt Modica, 
Kevin Wells. Matt McGillen, Bob Rosing, Ed Campbell. Sixth Row: Steve Madej, Kevin Fitch. 



Greeks 



293 




Chi Omega: First Row: J. Sims, A. McCartney, J. WIgnall, N. Obradovich, E. Nelson, K. Weber, J. Hartmen, L. Doughty, J. Mirco, A. Hanneken, A. 
Pesce. Second Row: K. Ma, J. Donahoe, H. Gratza, J. Hodapp, L. Segal, H. Zar, S. Kurpita, K. Bittner, L. Nalbandian, L. Minster, J. Carey, M. 
Yuknis, L. McQuiggan, K.Speyer, L. Kordasin, L. Donovan. Third Row: C. Dahlquist, C. Rodman, G. Marucco, J. Klein, C. Rose, A, Trimble. A. 
Lindwedel, M. Das, B. Berning, J. Lenci, I. Clough. G. Hoppe. J. Elko, D. Janes, M. Hanson, M. Stevens. Fouth Row: A. Webb, J. Foster. K. Canfield, 
E. Dettrok, K. Berg, K, Gorny, N. Grau. A. Caruso, C. Debruler, J. Upchurch. V, Parrillo, T. Laux, E. Sullivan, A. Grosboll. K. Fudge. H, Wainscott, J. 
O'Connor, A. McClusky. Fifth Row: K. Grode, A. Braid, J. Winter. H. Clough. C. McLaughlin, K. K. Bierman, A. Cerny, J. Weidenbach, N. Summer, K. 
Judd, K, Tryba. J. Wojick. Sixth Row: S. Johnson. L. Honigschmidt, A. Ryan, J. Rhodes. S. Elliot, H, Haevner, J, Tokarz, H. Hollett. T. Kretzer, S. 
McDonald, T. Macek, N. Bartolic, L. Miller, M. Rosado. K. Lenthe. Seventh Row: C. Coba, S, Roy. K. O'Donnell, K. Pelak. C, Kolhase, C, Shukas, J. 
Lasser, J. Chase, C. Fruend, P. Reyes, C, Stearney, J, Grisolano, A. Antonelli. M. Tomczak. K, Ryan, A, Hilton. L, Grabowski, J, Meyer. S. Lee, T. 
Sjoholm, H. Doucha, R. Sabo. S. Gallick. L. Brown. Eighth Row: L. Durkin, J, Blue, L. Hodges. J. Crusius. S. Wiltz, S, Kordash. A. Mathon. 



*•'.*> 
'''. \^^ 



Chi Omega Seniors: Front Row: 
K. Gorny, C. Stearney. S. 
McDonald, T. Laux, S, Watts. J. 
Schuler, A. Mathon, S, Gallick. R. 
Sabo. K. Berg. Second Row: A, 
Hilton, H. Hollett. L. Grabowski. 
T. Macek. K. Fudge, L. Durkin, J. 
O'Connor, H. Wainscott. S, Wiltz. 
H, Doucha, A. Kaiser, 





ma^t^KA 




O Chi Omega was 
founded on April 5, 
1895, at the 
Universtiy of 
Arkansas. 

O The Omicron 
Chapter has been 
on the University of 
Illinois campus 
since 1900, and 
located at 907 S. 
Wright St. since 
1920. 

O Chi Omega's colors 
are cardinal and 
straw. The symbol 
is the owl and the 
flower is the white 
carnation. 

O Chi Omega's 
national philan- 
thropy is a read 
aloud program. The 
Omicron chapter 
currently reads for 
the U of I's 
Rehabilitation 
Education Center 
which is located on 
campus. 

O The new pledge 
class raises money 
each year for their 
walkout and pledge 
dance through a 
"Spookgetti 
Dinner." This event 
takes place the 
Sunday before 
Halloween every 
year. 




Greeks 



;• 



Table of Contents 




Advertising Federation of America 


321 


Agribusiness 


320 


A pha Kappa Psi 


327 


Alpha Lambda Delta 


321 


Army ROTC 


330 


ASCE 


320 


Atius Sachem 


298 


Black Greets Council 


299 


Block 1 


326 


Chemica Engineering 


330 


Civil Engineering 


324 


Daily lllini 


300, 336 


Delta Sigma Pi 


331 


Engineering Counci 


325 


Epsilon Delta 


335 


Gir s Next Door 


333 


Horticulture Club 


332 


II ini Pride 


308 


II io 


302 


Interfraternity Council 


309 


Issue 


306 


lUB 


326 


Koinonia and Stratford Houses 


276 


LAS Counci 


334 


Leisure and Recreation 


332 


Ma Wan Da 


342 




. ONS 



s6a^eitL 




Otganizations 



Men's Glee Club 


333 


NaborHouse 


284 


The Other Guys 


338 


Panhel enic Council 


346 


Paraprofessional Carrer Consultants 




334 




Phi Beta Sigma 


317 


Phi Gamma Nu 


331 


Pre-Law Club 


347 


Presby House 


277 


RAVE 


322 


RHA 


310 


Shi-ai 


348 


Starcourse 


349 


Student Advancement 


312 


Student Alumni Association 


313 


Student Ambassadors 


316 


SGA 


352 


Student Trustee 


318 


Tech nog raph 


343 


Unity Week 


340 


VIP 


311 


Women's Glee Club 


339 


Women's Golf 


348 


WPGU 


314,344 


X-tension Chords 


328 



Table of Contents 



297 



H 



Atius 



lem 



il 



Atius and Sachem are sophomore and junior activities and leadership honoraries composed of a group of 
highly motivated individuals dedicated to the development of campus leadership. 

Our strength is generated from commitment of excellence to our university, our community and each other. 
Atius-Sachem serves as a campus model of excellence in our approach, our product and the results attained. 

We seek to foster growth, scholarship and philanthropy in each other and our commitments. 

One of the most active honoraries on campus, members plan events such as the "The College Challenge" dur- 
ing Homecoming, "Dad's Night Our" and the annual "Mom's Day Sing," a campus tradition. 



Atius: Frist Row: Julie 

O'Donnell, Sara Young, 

Angela Brey, Shawna 

Robert, Christian 

Grieshaber. Second 

Row: Stephanie Chase, 

Nicole Summer, Laurie 

Krajecki, Chris 

Stortzum, Scott 

Scheuber. Third Row: 

Jennifer Koszyk, Greg 

Shields, Andrew Sachs, 

Kelli Harsch, Bonnie 

MacDonald, Tc^n 

Thompson. Not 

Pictured; Amy 

Bunselmeyer, Holly 

Hinderliter. Brandon 

Peele, Juliana Wong. 



Sachem: Frist Row: Jill 

Winter, Julie Klein. 

Kathy Axe, Richard 

Stockton, Marina 

Levina. Second Row: 

David Zi.ssman, Daisie 

Yu, Joannie T Wei, 

Joan Mocek, Shunsuke 

Okubo, Katie O'Neill. 

Third Row: Sara 

Johnson, Lynn I5rown, 

Molly Tarter, Amy 

Amato, Alison Begor, 

Sheri Malec. Not 

Pictured: David 

Arenberg, Lee Bass, 

Annette Cole, Jessica 

DuBruin, Catherine 

Munson, Sasha 

'f'lK)m[:)s()n, Hei)ecca 

Ylx-. 




298 



Organizations 



^MKift 



Black 



Greek Council 



Black Greek Council is composed of the historically African-American fraternities and sororities on the University 
of Illinois campus and serves as the governing council for these organizaitons. 

The active members of the Black Greek Council for the 1995-96 school year are Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, 
Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Beta Phi Pi Fraternity, Delta 
Sigma Theta Sorority, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority and Sigma Gamma Rlio Sorority. 

In addition to annual projects such as our Thanksgiving Food Drive, Black Greek Council has also co-sponsored 
events as the Delta Sigma Theta-Alpha Phi Alpha 11th Annual Ritual, the Sister-Sister Program sponsored by Zeta 
Phi Beta in conjunction with Sigma Gamma Rho and Delta Sigma Theta to promote AIDS Awareness and the 
joint GBC, IFC and Panhellenic Council forum on Greek unity and the future of Greek-letter organizations spon- 
sored by Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity. 

One of the highlights of our school year is the annual Stepdown competition, held each April, in which the fra- 
ternities and sororities compete with each other using innovative steps, dances and choreography. 

Black Greek Council General Assembly: 

First Row: Harold McLellan, Isiah Lockharc, 
Jeffery Eaton, Malou Cristobal, LaToya 
Flowers, Torya Britten Second Row: Catriese 
Henning, Tiffany Quinn, Tommy Black, 
Kenya Garrett, Natasha Parker, Simone 
Taylor, Karla Blumenberg, Peggie Burnett. 
Third Row: Kyle Jemison, Anthony Martin, 
John Bennett, Brian Dawson, Gerald Ward, 
Wilson Terrell, Ere Annafi, Darrick Hooker. 
Fourth Row: Kataka Gillespie, Yuji Toefield, 
Christopher Nolen, Jerrold Washington, 
De'Avlin Olguin. 




Black Greek Council 
Executive Board: 

First Row: Jeffen' 
Eaton, Malou Cristobal. 
LaToya Flowers, Kyle 
Jemison, Isiah 
Lockhait. 



Black Greek Council 
Chapter Presidents: 

First Row: Catriese 
Henning, Kenya 
Garrett. Second Row: 
Harold McLellan, Brian 
l)awsc:)n. Tommy 
Black. 



Organizations 



299 




ally Illini 



lly 



:C Daily Illini is the independent, student-run newspaper of the University of Illinois. It is a part of the Illini 
.ledia Company. 

This award-winning paper is operated by students interested in furthering their careers within the newspaper 
industry. 

The Daily Illini is run by two student managers; one manager handles the advertising and the other is in charge 
of the editorial makeup of the paper. 



Daily Illini Advertising: First 

Row: Erin Miller. Second Row: 

Jaygee Macapugay, Heide 

Hayenga, Amy McClusky, Chris 

Marty, Patty Burle.son, Michelle 

Chen, Kim Habisohn, Robert 

Meredith. Back Row: Karey 

Lipke, Sarah Klimes, Steve 

Curran, Darin Repp, Bridget 

Rhea, Damon Shipe, Jennifer 

Flesner, Nancy Elliott. 



DaUy Illini Editorial: First 

Row: Matt Grotto, Lance E. 

Johnson, John Hanson. Second 

Row: Kris Kudenholdt, Jeff 

Agrest, Leah Setzen. Third Row: 

Ryan Smith, Dan Vock, Mike 

Smith, Michelle Collins, Brian 

Wasag, Mike Cetera, Courtney 

Challos, Will Leitch. Fourth 

Row: Andy Ryback, Harry 

Hitzemann, Ryan Donovan, Trey 

Gehrt, Her.schel Williams, Matt 

Hagemann. 



11 




300 



Organizations 



/tBi6iUm«jL 




Daily Illini Editors: First 
Row: Mike Cx-tcra, Ryan Smith, 
Will Ix'itch. Second Row: 
Michelle Collins, Courtney 
Challos, Leah Setzen. Third 
Row: Kris Kuclenholdt, Jeff 
Agrest. Brian Wasag. Fourth 
Row: Trey Gehrt, Matt Grotto, 
Matt Hagemann. 



The Daily Illini's year-end party- 
was a big success. Lance 
Johnson can attest to its success. 



Photo Editor, Matt Grotto, and 
the Illini Media Company's 
Publisher, Jim McKellar, were 
the center of attention at the 
year-end party. 



ORGANIZATIONS 



301 



The lUio is the yearbook of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

It is mn by approximately 50 university students and is a division of the Illini Media Company. 

Each story is written, each picture is taken and each page is produced by a skilled staff. 



Illio Staff: Back Row: Peter 

Mackay, Ramiro Nava, Rick 

Lawrence, Ben Hoyle, 

Stephen Wunderlich, Lisa 

Whitenack, Dave Moser, Tim 

Shea. Middle Row: Sheowting 

Lu, Chuan-Lin Alice Tsai, 

Anne Peterson, Carla 

Schoepfle, Colleen 

Christensen, Anna 

Nommensen, Sara Cahill. 

Sitting: Amara Rozgus, 

Debbie Williams, Jill Kogan, 

Kristina Castillo, Suk Ju Yun, 

Amie Megginson, Jennifer 

Arendarczyk, Dan Ryan. 




Illio Editors: Suk Ju ^\in, 
special pages editor; Dan 
Ryan, sports editor; Debbie 
Williams, managing editor; 
Kri.stina Ca.stillo, .student life 
editor; Jill Kogan, production 
editor; Amie Megginson, 
graduates editor; Paul Grano, 
photo editor; Jennifer 
Arendarczyk, copy coach; 
Amara Rozgus, editor in 
chief. Not pictured: Emma 
Brennan, academics editor; 
Pam Riley, greeks and orga- 
nizations editor. 






;^. 









P'V'5!»H. 'v^ '■ 



m 




^•» 



302 Organizations 



,:-l^. 




•^*^l 



Illio Writers: Back Row: 

Tim Shea, Stephen 
W'undeiiich, Ben Hoyle. 
Front Row: Sheowting Lu. 
Anne Peterson, Chuan-Lin 
Alice Tsai. 



7TK L 



I'^-^m < 




Illio Photographers: Peter 
Mackay, Da\'e Moser, Carla 
Schoepfle. 



The Illio 



303 



Illio Production: Ramirci 
Nava, Rick Lawrence, Lisa 
Whitenack, Colleen 
Christensen, Sara Cahill, 
\nna Nommensen. 



Illio Business 

Staff: Front Row: 

Leslie Portnoy, Anil 

Mansukhani. Second 

Row: Bill 

O'Donnell, Kent 

Roesslein, Brad 

Heuberger 




304 Organizations 



lUio 



The Illio staff members come from a variety of colleges within the university. Majors range from animal sciences 

to special education to psychology to journalism. 

The 464-page book is produced entirely on computers, using the latest graphics technology. 

Members of the staff travel to national and local conventions to meet peers and learn more about the yearbook 

industry. 

Photographer Dave Moser, 
Copy Coach Jennifer 
Arendarczyk, Editor in Chief 
Amara Rozgus and Production 
Editor Jill Kogan live it up with 
the Daily Illini at their year- 
end party. 




The lUio's editor in chief, Amara 
Rozgus, and the Illini Media 
Company's publisher, Jim 
McKellar, pose for an intimate 
picture at the Daily Illini's 
swingin' party. 



Organizations 



305 



The 




i 



'' J he Issue is the new independent student magazine at the U of I. It comes out at the beginning of each month 
and discusses various issues as they relate to the U of I's students. The Issue also highlights students' achieve- 
ments with monthly featues like "Person to Person" and "Your Campus." In addition, the magazine helps stu- 
dents learn more about their world with "Future Shock" (a column describing life in the real world of work) 
as well as "Pen & Ink" and "The Gallery", The Issue's creative writing and art sections. 

• We employ about 20 U of I students, providing them with valuable experience in reporting and writing, pho- 
tography, magazine layout, advertising and management. Students from all levels, from freshman to graduate, 
and many different majors work for the magazine. 

• Some of The Issue's past topics include sex, student apathy, the administration, alcohol and transportation. 
Plus, The Issue's features have covered such diverse topics as the U of I's rugby teams, finding a job with the 
help of the World Wide Web and the haircare habits of U of I students. 

• We are free for anyone in the campus commimity and are usually distributed on the Quad, at IMPE, at the 
Orange and throughout Campustown. 

• The Issue has mangaged to, in one way or another, sneak the word "ass" into each and every magazine they 
distributed during the 1995-96 school year. It has appeared on the cover, in headlines and has been laced 
through many stories. 

The Issue: First Row: Robert J. Nesvacil, 
editor in chief; Jocelyn Park, features edi- 
tor; Kevin Jerbi, business manager. Second 
Row: Jennifer Jorgenson, photo editor and 
arts & literature editor; Emma Johnson, 
junior editor; Suzi Millas, promotions man- 
ager. Third Row; Rogelio Aranda, chief 
copy editor; Luke Albrecht, topics editor; 
Ingrid Schnable, art director. 



306 Organizations 








Organizations 307 



ini Pride 



Tiie Illini Pride Student Athletic Board is the largest student organization on campus. 

They support Illini athletics by working closely with the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and showing 

their Illini Pride. 

Illini Pride organizes the Orange Krush basketball cheering section. 

They support the Fighting Illini by organizing road trips to several Big Ten games. 

Illini Pride is dedicated to the preservation and enhancement of the true Illini spirt. 



Illini Pride: First Row : 

Matt Hennenfent. Jan 

Croegaert, Amanda Hilton, 

Jason Tompkins, Matt 

Goben, Bart Bittner, 

Donna Rolf, Jen Es worthy, 

Chris StortZLim. Second 

Row: Ashlea Raymond, 

Kim Harper, Matt Menet, 

Rob Kanabay, Todd 

Wallace, Mark Mosbarger, 

Aaron Bartlow, Jason 

Smith. Advisors: Mike 

Raycraft, Steve Staples. 




308 Organizations 



^didfeBK 



Interfraternity 

roiincH 



The Interfraternity Council (IFC) serves as the governing body to the fraternities on campus. 

Tiiey represent the fraternity system on campus, in the community and to the university administration. 

IFC sponsors events such as Homecoming Parade, Greek Week and Fraternity Rush. 

They have adopted a new scholarship policy to raise the all-fraternity GPA. 

IFC has reformed rush to increase the number of new members. 




Interfraternity Council: 

First Row; David Mouser, 
Matt O'Donnell, Nathan 
Hood, John Oh, Jacques 
Galante. Second Row: 
Matt Massucci, Tom 
Kristof, Marc DeVar. Not 
Pictured: Scott Weaver. 




Interfraternity Council Office 
Staff: Tiffany Cull, Deanna 
Stacey, Holly Meloy, Katie 
Collins. 



Organizations 



309 



Residence Hall 
sociation 




• The UIUC Residence Hall Association represents all students living in the Residence Halls. Each resident is an 
initomatic member of RHA. With more than eight thousand members, RHA is the second largest Registered 
Student Organization on campus and one of the most highly respected. 

• RHA's assembly consists of an Executive Board, Committee Chairpersons and representatives and presidents 
from each hall council and Black Student Union. 

• We sponsor and plan programs that benefit residents. Programming is instituted through the eight RHA com- 
mittees as well as the Hall councils and Black Student Unions. 

• RHA has continued to develop and recruit leaders through various conferences. Among these are the Allerton 

conference, the New Leader conference and the Spring conference. RHA is represented at state, regional and 
national levels. 

• The RHA Assembly has dealt with various issues involving policy in the residence halls and administration. In 

this year alone, RHA has dealt with proposed room and board rate increases, roommate bill of rights and 
many others. 

Residence Hall Association Executive Board 1995-96: 

First Row: Julie Sitz, treasurer; Kimberly Egonmwan, presi- 
dent; Sonya Raford, national communications coordinator. 
Second Row: Chris Penny, vice president; Kim Kolman, 
external vice president; Samir Shah, secretary; Jacque 

Bollinger, advisor. 



Committee Chairs 1995-96: First Row: Amy Ebelhack, 
multicultural awareness committee chair; Megan Dove, com- 
mimity service committee chair; Khushali Parikh, leadership 
development committee co-chair; Diane Darwish, budget 
and appropriations committee co-chair; Bridget 
VanLandeghem, housing concerns co-chair. Second Row: 
Bharat Patel, teambuilding chair; Josh Klinzing, fundrasing 
chair; Anthony Ritz, leadership development committee co- 
chair; Kevin Holdmann, budget and appropriations commit- 
tee co-chair; Adam DuMoulin, housing concerns co-chair. 
Not pictured: Erica Veguilla, public relations chair. 



Assembly 1995-96: First Row: Andy Clay, Ed Flores, Susan 

Mastrangeli, Erin Fancher, LeQue Vu, Tonisha Terry, 

Jennifer Honiotes, Kimberly Sutton, Jennifer Cartlidge. 

.Second Row: David Lauschke, Gcreg Michelini, Jeremy 

Sevcik, (;hri,ssy Filipowski, Marcjuis Tliompson, Natasha 

Pcsey, Larry Ba.ss, Amanda Harvey, Natasha Knight. Third 

Row: Jeremy Norris, Sheila Maloney, Shelly Bouillon, 

Christian Grieshaber, Yvonne Kabat, Kennda Lynch, 

LaWanda Thigpen, Stephen Cobb. Fourth Row: Jennifer 

Kozak, Brigette i'ierson, Ned Swanson, Scott Schciiber. 

Anllioiiv Kil/, I'^rii. Brown. 



310 



Organizations 




Volunteer 
Illini Projects 



Volunteer Illini Projects, one of the largest volunteer organizations in the nation, was founded in 1963 by Kenn 
Allen, a former Illini Homecoming Comeback Guest. VIP started as a tutoring sei-vice for local schools. 
Margaret Mead once said, "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the 
world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever does." These are the words that have inspired VIP for more than 30 
years, and these are the words we live by. 

VIP is comprised of 12 service projects (Best Buddies, Blood, Daycare, Friendship, Health Needs, Hunger and 
Homelessness, Nite Rides, Prison Concern, Recreation, Senior Citizens, Special Projects and Tutoring) and three 
administrative projects (Finance, Financial Development and Public Relations) which provide opportunities for 
U of I students to give back to the Champaign-Urbana community. 

Some of our activites include: Senior Prom, Haunted HayRack Rides, Special Olympics, Blood Drives and tutor- 
ing in local elementary schools. 

VIP has excelled in creating and maintaining active volunteer programs which have received numerous awards 
including an Award of Merit from the Champaign County Blood Bank, a Certificate of Appreciation from the 
American Red Cross and Don Moyer Boys and Girls Club Outstanding Organization Award. 







7 




Volunteer Illini Projects: First 
Row: Alpa Patel, Amisha Shah, Lisa 
Mansueto Foley, Debbie Scherer, 
Wendy Rogowski. Second Row: Mary 
Stremsterfer, Christopher Ramirez, 
Rebecca Krieger, Julie Limon, Emily 
Jungheim, Teri Carlson, Vik Panchal. 
Third Row: Ryan Almon, Kelly 
Lidinsky, George Singh, Paul Foppe, 
Courtney Hollister, Kristine Kostenly, 
Emma Brennan, Regina Kim. Not 
Pictured: Renee Brockman, Adam 
Brown, Dawn Johnson, Carrie Kerns, 
Sheriy Tan. 



Organizations 



31 1 



student Advancement 



mmittee 



\ J\ ancement Committee was organized in 1988 to assist the Office of Development, Alumni and 
Corporate Relations in raising friends and funds for the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental 
Sciences. 

• SAC'S membership includes 30 undergraduate students representing all disciplines in the College of Agricultural, 
Consumer and Environmental Sciences. 

yjy • For the past seven years, SAC members have assisted with the College's annual Phone-A-Thon, which involves 

more than 150 students and faculty volunteers, and thousands of alumni and friends of the College in raising 
more than $100,000 annually to support programs in the College 

• The Deans Club Party, Presidents Council Reception, JBT Banquet and ACES Open House are among the other 
campus events hosted by SAC. 

• Events such as Leader Shape's Team Challenge Course, holiday caroling and spring cookout for new members 
round out SAC's busy calendar. 

Student Advancement 
Committee: First Row: 
Michael Dare, Stephanie 
Rhodes, Holly Hinderliter, 
Tracy Boe, Meg Webster, 
Sally Springer. Second 
Row: Jeff Brown (advi- 
sor), Jessica Smith, Kate 
Stokes, Lori Allaman, Joe 
Webel, Bradley Wolter, 
Sarah Schilling (advisor). 
Third Row: Bryan 
Anderson, Bill Bodine, 
Jason Dunseth, Jason 
Tompkins, Ryan 
Aupperie, Jason Logsdon. 
Fourth Row: Ryan Wilson, 
Matt Kellog, John 
Dickenson, Aaron 
Bartlow. 




student Alumni 



Association 



The Student Alumni Association is a student-run organization sponsored l^y the University of Illinois Alumni 

Association. 

Our role on campus is to develop positive relations among University students, alumni, faculty and staff. 

Throughout the year, SAA sponsors many projects and events to foster this development. 

Some of the projects include Be a Part From the Start, Sibling's Weekend, Homecoming, Sui-vival Kits, Senior 

Reception, Senior 100 Honorary, Senior Challenge, Illini Comeback and Chatauqua. 




Student Alumni Association: First 
Row; Chris Crawford, Cliristie Mathieson, 
Jennifer Sherlock, Cathy Jung, Cliff 
Peterson. Second Row: Heather 
Schlaffer, Melissa Halting, Brooke 
Puccini, Daisie Yu, Priya Cele, Brandon 
Hulbut, Tony Perkins. Third Row: 
Juliania Wong, Ann Smith, Jodi Kawada, 
Jen Marble, Sharon Rendel, Deanna 
McClung. Fourth Row: Melissa Gray, 
Amy Amato, Katie Jenson, Laura Zerbe, 
Kelli Lynch. Fifth Row: Grant Guenther, 
Neil Jensen, David Zissman, Lynn 
Brown, Brian Basch. Sixth Row: 
Christian Reweker, Jason Donseth, Case 
Pudik, Josh McKey, Dominic Susus, 
Ryan Foster, Matt Golden, Jim Nyssar. 



Student Alumni Association 
Executive Board Members: First 
Row: Christie Mathieson, Jennifer 
Sherlock (president), Jennifer Fynn. 
Second Row: Cliff Peterson, Cathy 
lung, Chris Crawford. 



Organizations 



313 



Members of tlic Planet 
staff pose at a stop on the 
Shamrock Stagger. 



^ti 






«■ « J 



^^^ 




, c 



u+4 



The Planet staff poses in front 
of the new office located at 
24 E. Green St. in Champaign. 




314 Organizations 



■4aoi^. 



107 One The Planet 



WPGU, 107 One The Planet, is a 24-hour commercial radio station primarily run by University of Illinois students 

and is part of the Illini Media Company. 

The Planet is one of only a handful of successful commercial student-run radio stations in the countiy. 

More than 100 students of varying majors work behind the scenes in promotions, student sales, copy writing, 

news and sports reporting, engineering, programming, producing and, of course, on-air. 

WPGU attained the highest share of any modern rock station in the country for adults 12 and over. 

The Planet recognizes the importance of community involvement. WPGU participates in many annual charity 

events, including hosting Operation Santa Glaus. 

PlanetFest was a great success. 
Kim Haskell, Ben Ponzio, the 
lead singer of Shudder to Think, 
Naomi Adams and Dave Leitner 
enjoy the festivities. 




Fun, Santa and happy kids 
were all present at WPGU's 
philanthropic event, Operation 
Santa Claus. 



Organizations 



315 



student 
Embassadors 



® Student Ambassadors serve as representational and informational liasons between the student body, faculty, 
alumni, high school students, community members and guests of the university. 

• Ambassadors act as the official student representatives of the University of Illinois. 

• Members work a variety of events sponsored by the President's House, the Chancellor's Office, the Alumni 
Association, the Foundation, the Office of Admissions and the Visitor's Center. 

• Ambassadors receive extensive training on subjects like campus safety, residence halls and private certified hous-! 

ing, diversity issues, cultural centers and facts about our university history. 

• Student Ambassadors is comprised of a select group of 50 diverse members representing a wide range of majors] 

colleges, backgrounds and interests. 

Student Ambassadors: First 

Row: Christie Mathieson, Stacy 

Ferega, Amy Keller, Jessica 

Newman, Angela Grosboll, 

Shelly Zumwalt, Nicole 

Williams, Vicky Pastemak, Maria 

Shade. Second Row: Michelle 

Shade, Lisa Guerra, Kristen 

Maslowski, Jennifer Cox, Chris 

Welch, Jeff Bobis, Andy Sachs, 

Jim Miller. Third Row: Rusty 

Mann, Aaron Wilken, Kristin 

Duitsman, Jay Dahlin, Dallon 

Christensen, Lynn Brown, Matt 

Kellogg, Stacey Chinn, Greg 

Brown, Laura Huntington, Brian 

Lehn, Melanie Tomczak. 



Student Ambassadors 
Executive Board: 

Jennifer Cox, vice presi- 
dent of membership and 

internal relations; Chris 

Welch, president; Jeff 

Bobis, vice president of 

programs and services. 



316 



Organizations 




Phi Eta 



Sigma 



Phi Eta Sigma is a national freshman honorary open to all freshmen receiving a 4.5 GPA or above. 

We are dedicated to the promotion of scholarship throughout the university community. 

Phi Eta Sigma members give their time and support to the community through tutoring and various service 

projects. 

We compete for many national Phi Eta Sigma scholarships and awards. 
Phi Eta Sigma members can attend a series of seminars held throughout the year which provide information to 

members on various topics ranging from scholarships to undergraduate research opportunities. 

Phi Eta Sigma: 

Christopher Neu, histo- 
rian; Christina Wu, 
tutoring chairperson; 
Kelli E. Harsch, presi- 
dent; Patrick R. Eaton, 
treasurer. Not Pictured: 
Joel Mowbray, vice- 
president; Michael 
Oliveros, secretary; 
Dean Sylvia Riley, 
dean. 




Phi Eta Sigma 
Executive Board. 



Organizations 317 




• ^'^■; ^ 



Urbana- 

Champaign's 

Student 

Trustee 

keeps us in 

touch with 

the 
university's 
government 



K 



Story by 
Anne Peterson 

Layout by 
Amara Rozgus 



o many, Chapin Rose 
may have been just 
another face among 
the 36,000 under- 
graduates on the U 
of I campus. 
However, he had a 
responsibility unique 
from others. Rose 
ras the student trustee for 
the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign. In other 
words. Rose acted as a liaison 
between the U of I students 
and the Board of Trustees. 
Rose, along with student 
trustees from the Chicago 
and Springfield campuses, 
met with the Board monthly. 
During the meetings, the 
Trustees voted on topics 
addressed by the U of 1 
administration. Included in 
these topics were tuition, uni- 
versity funding and new 
building construction. 

Rose, also a member of the 
SGA student Affairs 
Committee, led the reform 
which recently cut the yearly 
SGA budget. This funding 
came from a $2 fee every U of 
I student had to pay. 

Rose said, "The SGA only 
squandered this money 
instead of actually having the 
students benefit from it." 
For the fall 1995 ballot. 
Rose promised to cut these 
student fees in half. U of 1 
students agreed with him by 



voting to cut the budget. 

Gregg Altmeyer, sopho- 
more in Engineering, said, "I 
admire Chapin Rose for his 
persistance pertaining to our 
Student Government 
Association. I feel that cut- 
ting the SGA revenue in half 
is a step in the right direc- 
tion." 

Besides cutting funding. 
Rose planned to restructure 
the SGA for the spring 1996 
ballot. He would like to 
include a new constitution 
which eliminates active mem- 
bership. Under active mem- 
bership, a student was able to 
vote after attending only two 
meetings. Although this has 
allowed any student the right 
to give input, they were also 
allowed to reap the benefits 
offered by the SGA. 

Rose, who was intent on 
SGA reconstruction, said, 
"There is no reason SGA 
needs active membership. We 
are the only school in the Big 
Ten who has it." 

Tom Lamont, member of 
the U of I Board of Trustees, 
stated, "I have found Chapin 
to be one of the smarter, 
more effective student 
trustees that we have ever 
had. He works very well in 
the system. He knows how to 
get things done and is very 
well-prepared when it comes 
to dealing with people." 



318 



Greeks and Organizations 



viaatia/. 




^^^B ' 


P^E 


^H 


^^^^^^~jj,„„^_j 


P,.^^^ 


*e-^->:fl^^^H 




- 


\ ^ 


■■ 




BB^ A 






^ , '<k 






^Zpr'. 




^ 


~- * 


^. ^ wt^ 


m 


BMfcM^^L^^'"^- ■ . 




^4 


1 






1 



iJtudent Goveniment 
Association members dis- 
cuss the future ofAmtrak 
service to the Champaign- 
Urbana area with Chapin 
Rose. 



kJ tudent Trustee Chapin 
Rose spends his days mak- 
ing sure students get treat- 
ed right. He said, ''Student 
input really helps in the 
process. " 



eeting with other student leaders is 
the best way to solve student problems. 
Rose spends a great deal of time talking 
with students and listening to their prob- 
lems. 



Student Trustee 



319 



College of ACES 
ident Council 



Sezves as the governing body for the students within the College of Agricultral, Consumer and Environmental 

Sciences. 

Dedicated to maintaining student representation in the enhancement of educational programs at the U of I. 

Provides leadership experiences and professional and career development for students. 

Motivated to recognize and understand diversity in our society. 

Promoting the general welfare of all undergraduate students in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and 

Environmental Sciences. 




Agribusiness 
Association = 



• Our objective is to make students aware of the opportunities available to them and enhance their knowledge Oj 
the field of agribusiness. ! 

• Our purpose is to enhance professional development and leadership skills and to promote the highest standarc 
of excellence among our members. 

• We are affiliated with the student section of the American Agricultural Economics Association and the National I 
Agri-Marketing Association. 

• Members include undergraduate and graduate students of majors who participate actively and have paid their 

dues. 

Executive Board of 
ABA includes: 

Michelle Aggcrtt, presi- 
dent; Angela Moore, 
vp-internal; Nick 
Lykins, vp-external; 
Chad Kolramel, vp- 
projects; Cyndi 
Czarnik, .secretary; 
janelle Lehmann, trea- 
surer; Ben Wen/el, 
reporter; Dr. Michael 
A. Mazzocco, advi.sor. 




320 



Organizations 



American 
Advertising Federation 

The American Advertising Federation is a national organization. 

We educate our members on all aspects of the advertising industry. 

The American Advertising Federation at the University of Illinois introduces its members to professionals in the 

advertising industiy. 

We compete in the National Student Advertising Competition. 

Members of the American Advertising Federation receive hands-on experience in art director and copywriter 

positions through the communicaton services program of the federation. 




American Advertising Federation: First Row: 
Teresa Kao, vp programs; Jennifer Sinak, presi- 
dent; Erica Veguilla, vp publications. Second 
Row: Alicia Newland, communications managing 
director; Jennifer Cieslak, treasurer; Tori Nicolle, 
vp NSAC. Third Row: Marsha Poff, secretary; 
Regine Norgle, fundraising; Michelle Chen, vp 
research. 



Alpha 
Lambda Delta 



Alpha Lambda Delta is a national honor society consisting of students who accoinplish a grade point average 
of 4.5 or higher during their first year in college. 

Our purpose is to encourage superior scholastic achievement among students in their first year at an institution 
of highter education, and to promote intelligent living on a continued high standard of learning. 
The U of I established the first chapter in the spring of 1924. There are more than 200 chapters nationwide. 
Alpha Lambda Delta is the only student organization that gives an Outstanding Teacher Award at the all-cam- 
pus Instructional Awards Banquet held each spring to honor excellent instructors on this campus. 
We are very active around campus. We sponsor the campus-wide effort to recycle, tutor college and elementary 
school students and sponsor a scholarship week. 

Alpha Lambda Delta Executive Officers: First 
Row: Courtney Heinrikson, secretary; Susan Sim, 
treasurer. Second Row: Matt Elhers, vice-president; 
Jolynn Caroline, president; Wendy Lawler. Not pic- 
tured: Julianna Wong, philanthropy; Candice Smith, 
academic director; Wendy Lawler, public relations; 
Jen Ryan, junior advisor; Sara Pocius, junior advi- 
sor; Gee Gee Kan, senior advisor. 




Organizations 



321 




i 



RAVE comes 

together 

and makes a 

difference 

by serving 

the 
community 



Story by 
Pam Riley 
Layout by 

Ron Lee 



hen you first got to college 
did you know how to get 
involved or what you 
wanted to do? These days 
more students are interest- 
ed in giving back to their 
community because of how 
it makes them feel and how 
it looks to employers and graduate 
schools. 

Residents Active in Volunteer 
Efforts (RAVE) tries to encourage 
new students to volunteer. The 
organization is designed so one 
resident advisor from each resi- 
dence hall serves on the RAVE 
Board of Directors. It is their job to 
organize activities promoting com- 
munity service in their hall as well 
as encouraging involvement in 
such larger programs as Oxfam 
and Make a Difference Day. 

"The best thing about it is that 
all the Residence Halls work 
together/' said Tom Smith, junior 
in education and RAVE board of 
directors member. Smith always 
encourages people to reflect on 
their experiences after they volun- 
teer, and thinks that being able to 
pull students from all over the uni- 
versity helps students get more out 
of their experiences. 

"The more people you have, the 
more chances they have to share 
their experiences," Smith said. 

Each hall designed programs for 
its own residents to do in small 
groups. Some halls volunteer at the 
men's shelter, others give residents 
an opportunity to coach a soccer 
team for children in the communi- 
ty, still others plan activities with 
senior citizens in the area. 

Forbes Hall decided that this 
year they wanted to decorate a 
nursing home on a monthly basis. 
Residents got togethcM* to buy and 
make decorations and then took 



trips together to the nursing home 
to put them up. 

"Decorating the nursing home is 
a great activity because students 
get to see that they are really affect- 
ing people," said Lenae Weichel, 
senior in LAS and an advisor in 
Forbes Hall. 

RAVE also brings larger issues to 
the Residence Hall community so 
students realize there are problems 
in their own neighborhoods that 
they can work together to solve. 
Oxfam is one project designed to 
make people recognize what it 
means to be hungry. With coopera- 
tion from University Food Service, 
students can give up their dinner 
on their meal pass. The money 
goes toward buying food for those 
that are starving in the world. 

Make A Difference Day is anoth- 
er large program. It helps clean up 
the community by getting residents 
to gather together all on one day to 
rake leaves and pick up garbage. 
This year it happened on Oct. 21, 
1995. This program shows students 
how they can change the appear- 
ance of a neighborhood by work- 
ing together 

"Community restoration is 
essential to improving esteem for 
communities and people," said 
Chris Kozlowski, junior in LAS 
and programming advisor at Allen 
Hall. "Make A Difference Day 
allows people to get in touch with 
themselves by giving to other peo- 
ple and reflecting on their own 
self-sacrifice." 

RAVE will be around to continue 
encouraging as many students as 
possible to get involved in the area 
they live in. RAVE hopes to show 
people why helping someone else 
helps yourself by leaving you with 
a feeling that makes you feel genu! 
on the inside. 



322 



Greeks and Organizations 




Peter Mackay 




a 



II Make A Difference Day, 
2 Stacie Clumpner, Jeremy 
f Seiicik and Teresa Priesbe, 
sophomores in LAS, admire 
their handiwork after remov- 
ing a bicycle and a shopping 
cart from Boneyard Creek in 
Scott Park. 



kJtudents help clean up at 
Birch Village in Champaign. 
Other projects by RAVE are 
Oxfam and decorating a nurs- 
ing home. 



RAVE 323 



merican Society of 
ivil Engineers ^=^ 



I 



• The University of Illinois Chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers is the largest student chapter in the 
country. 

• On April 26th through the 28th the University of Illinois student chapter hosted the regional concrete canoe and 
steel bridge competitions. 

• ASCE has three general meetings each semester for all members, which include a guest speaker to present a 
Civil Engineering related topic. 

• ASCE offers the membership field trips, E.I.T. review sessions, community service activities, sponsorship for pro- 
jects in Engineering Open House, sponsorship of intramural teams and social events. 

• The purpose of the student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers is to provide a better balance to 

the education that Civil Engineers receive. 

American Society of 

CivU Engineers 

Officers: First Row: 

Mike Han. Chris KroU, 

Lou Gale, Hans Bell, 

Chris Thomas. Second 

Row: Tracy Victorine. 

Jamie Jackson, Sarah 

Podorsek, Katy 

Perrings, Cecilia 

Chang, Pretti Ghuman. 

Third Row: Matt 

Sudduth, Dan Mlacnik. 

Jim Danalewich. Brian 

Hackman, Nate 

Schwartz, Professor 

Stephen Schneider, Jen 

Harris. 



I 



324 




Organizations 






Engineering 
roiincil 



Engineering Council is one of the largest and most active organizations of its type in the country. 

We coordinate major campus activities that benefit all engineering students. 

Engineering Council acts as a unifying force between its 46 member professional and honorary societies. 

We provide student inpLit to the Dean of the College of Engineering. 

Engineering Council promotes student leadership and organizational skills in a professional environment. 




Engineering Council: 

First Row: Gerry King, 
Maureen Duhig. Jeff 
Ross, Tiffany 
Vandervelde. Second 
Row: Eric Chamberlain, 
Sarah Dolezal, Andrea 
Cukimber, Shunsuke 
Otciibo. Third Row: 
Rebecca Silver, Jet-Sun 
Lin, Emmy Huang, 
Kevin Safford, Aimee 
Frake, Cecilia Chang, 
Courtney Acker. 



Organizations 325 



Illitii Union Board 



The iUini Union Board advises the director of the Illini Union on building policies and operations. 

lUB is also responsible for providing programs and services to students, faculty, staff, alumni and guests of the 

university. 

The Illini Union Board Program Council is comprised of ten programming areas, each coordinated by an lUB 

student member that plans educational, social and cultural activities for the campus community. 

lUB programs include fall and spring musicals, African-American Homecoming, Block I, International Festival, 

the Illini Union Art Gallery, Mom's Day Fashion Show, lectures such as William F. Buckley and Bobby Seale, 

weekend concerts and comedians and numerous other events. 

lUB is a major sponsor of campus cultural programming. They have many committees. 



I 



Illini Union Board: First Row: Peggie U. 

Burnett, Michelle Taylor, Katherine Abbott, 

Bonnie Chakravorty, Heidi Waldinger, Kim 

Johnson, Candice Meng, Jennifer Pfluger, 

Sharon Rendel, Fleur Lee, Yolanda Torres. 

Second Row: Jonathan Dooley, Susan Maul, 

Hank Walter, Xen Riggs, Maiylyn F. 

Rodgers, Suzanne Beauvior, Caroline 

Carlson, Gustav Goger, Steve Douglas, 

Jason Perry, Lori Lynn, Dan Stoffel, Claire 

O'Brien, Dan Lathitham, Ed Slazinik, Shelley 

Garrett. 




I" 



Block I 



• Block I is located on the 40 yard line on the east side of the Memorial Stadium. 

• Block I is led by 24 "Blockheads," a committee of lUB. Blockheads design and prepare stunts for the halftime 
shows, take an annual Big Ten football roadtrip, participate in Homecoming activities and work closely with 
Marching Illini to support and cheer on the football team. 

• Block I celebrated its 85th anniversary this year as the nation's oldest and largest card cheering section. 

• Block I began as a pep club in 1910 with 150 members. Today the block has 1,200 student participants. 

• Half-time card stunts are created using more than 11,000 plastic cards held up in designs through the use of 
computer generated instructions. Stunts feature words and pictures, and include such favorites as Gumby and 
Chief Illiniwek. 

Block I: First Row: Kim Johnson, Candy Kairys, Julie 
Larsen. Second Row: Molly Smeltzer, Bridget Rhea, 
Amy Bernstein, Samantha Holmes, Tamara Pavlovic. 
Third Row: Kim Wolowiec, Li.sa McGivern, Christina 
Swartzfager, Krisin Zivic, Katie Jansen, Jodi 
Altenbaumcr. F'ourth Row: Chris Johnson, Rogelio 
Aranda, Matt Rue, Kd Harwell, Scott Scheuber, Advisor 
Jon Dooley. Not Pictured: Gretchen Faulkner, Dana 
St. John, Heather We.s.son, Maria Murray, Jeff Barnes. 



326 



Organizations 




II 



Alpha Kappa Psi 



Founded in 1904, Alpha Kappa Psi is the nation's oldest professional business fraternity. 

The membership of Alpha Kappa Psi is composed of students from a variety of different business majors with 

diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds. 

The mission of Alpha Kapa Psi is to develop well-trained, ethical, skilled, resourceful and experienced business 

leaders. 

Alpha Kappa Psi provides the opportunity to develop leadership skills, professional qualities and friends for life. 

Alpha Kappa Psi offers diverse activities including professional speakers, field trips, philanthropies, barndances, 

formals, parties, football blocks, tailgates, broomball. basketball and other events. 

Alpha Kappa Psi: First Row: 
Andy Nahumyk, Edwin Kim, 
Michael Swanson, Matthew 
Pryor, Craig Saltzman, Gerald 
Huang, Rommel Famatid. 
Second Row: Joe Kim, Rochelle 
Mabilangan, Paulina Elkins, 
Kimberly Wolff, Cathy Yen, 
Jennifer Manalo, Amy Wen, 
Geegee Kan, Connie Guo, 
Joanne Hwa, Ellie Kim, Shoma 
Das, Juliana Wong, Ann Kurian, 
Suzanne Lind, Shannon 
Winters, Shawna Hicks, Third 
Row: Sulin Shah, Jennifer 
Dockins, Tina Plankis, Tandy 
Criner, Tricia Lamb, Jennifer 
Rebecca, Melissa Kilmczak, 
Sharon Kim, Candice Meng. 
Fourth Row: Sabrina Moscato, 
RJ. Bussone, Camelia Deian, 
Jean Slowik, Cori Newhausen, 
Suzanne Bye, Lisa Hopkins, 
Jennifer Snyder, Michelle 
Hacker, Carol Castelloni, 
Bernard Shim, Mark Palmer. 
Fifth Row: Kristen Berg, Ian 
Stetter, Dave Heitman, Rebecca 
Ullrick, Joyce Lo, Mary Janas, 
Lori Jesberg, Jolanta Wojcik, Jeff 
Hall, Marc Brown. Sixth Row: 
Mark Buckley, Kenny Cheung, 
Michael Benoit, David Olsen, 
Jason Arndt, Erik Norlin, Carlli 
Shaw, Theresa Williams, Scott 
Shoy. 




Organizations 327 



i 




m. 



Xtension 
Chords have 

a unique 

style that 
shows their 

genuine 
image 



Story by 
Jen n ifer Arenda rczyk 

Layout by 

Colleen Christensen 

and 

Amara Rozgus 



hether you sit in the 
audience at 

Acappellapalooza or lis- 
ten to the CD "Shock 
Value," you will be 
amazed by the Xtension 
Chords' intense energy. 
Each member's unique 
style lends itself to the group's 
collective image and their gen- 
uine approachability is indica- 
tive of why the Xtension 
Chords ~ a cappella singers ~ 
are now a U of 1 favorite. 

The Xtension Chords, the 
university's first independent all 
male a cappella group, formed 
in the spring of 1992 as a quar- 
tet. The group soon expanded 
into its current form, a powerful 
14-member ensemble. 

Their big break came in the 
fall of 1993. After their appear- 
ance at Dad's Night Out, the 
previously little-noticed group 
was launched into the campus' 
limelight. Feeding off their new- 
found popularity, the XChords 
sold out Lincoln Hall in the 
spring of 1994, then conquered 
Foellinger Auditorium the fol- 
lowing year. 

What makes the Xtension 
Chords so successful? 

"We offer a different kind of 
show," Kevin Wiland, senior in 
Engineering, said. "The 
XChords have a unique sound 
and style. We perform songs 
that our audiences love to hear 
and we use comedy to get the 
audience involved." 

Through the Internet, the 
Xtension Chords established 
relations with a cappella groups 
all over the country, especially 
on the East Coast where the a 
cappella genre is extremely pop- 



ular. In the spring of 1995, the 
XChords used their connections 
to book their first road trip tour. 
They performed 13 shows in 
nine days in six major cities 
across the East Coast. The 
Xtension Chords also helped U 
of I to be recognized as the top 
spot for a cappella in the 
Midwest. 

The highlight of the Xtension 
Chords' career was the release of 
their first album, "Shock Value." 
The Chords were responsible for 
every aspect of the production, 
requiring them to be gifted 
musicians, experienced busi- 
nessmen and producers. "Shock 
Value" has sold more than 
2,ooo copies and continues to 
sell throughout the nation and 
around the world. They also 
planned to release a second j 

album for the summer of 1996 ' 
and to perform at 
Acappellapalooza 3 in the 
spring of 1996. 

The commitment and sacrifice 
required to be a part of the 
Xtension Chords is immense, 
but well worth the effort. 

"It's a way of life," comment- 
ed Ken Purchase, graduate stu- 
dent. "I spend more time with 
the Chords than 1 do with 
myself." 

When asked to characterize 
the secret to their success, the 
Chords described the deep-root- 
ed friendship that they share 
with one another. 

"1 learned both musicianship 
and brotherhood from being a 
part of the group/' said David 
Wilner, senior in LAS. "If not for 
the guys, 1 may not have stayed 
at U of 1. 1 came here just a stu- 
dent — I'll leave here an XC'hord." 



328 



Groups and Greeks 





1. he 14 members of the 
Xtension Chords gather 
around the microphone 
during a recording session. 
The a capella group plans 
to release a new record in 
the summer of 1996. 



R 



.ecording a new album 
takes a great deal of time 
and effort. The Xtension 
Chords' first album sold 
more than 2,000 copies. 



— Peter Mackay 



XTENSION Chords 



329 



American Institute of 



iT^' 



liemical Engineers 



• The AiTierican Institute of Chemical Engineers provides an opportunity for chemical engineering undergraduates 
to interact with others in their field and learn more about their chosen career path. 

• Activities this year included participation in Engineering Open House, travel to AICH conferences, presentations 
by members of industry, trips to area industries and several social gatherings. 

• AICE offers interaction with both professional chemical engineers as well as other chemical engineering majors. 

American Institute of 
Chemical Engineers: 

First Row: Kathy Tritz, 
Nic Scher, Athena 
Theodorakis (presi- 
dent), Jennifer Zielke. 
Second Row: Chris 
Kalish, Karl Putz, Chris 
Hancock, Scott Mills, 
Tun Mao. 




Army ROTC 



• Army ROTC is one of the oldest organizations at the U of I and has been here since the university was estab- 
lished. 

• Army ROTC commissions at least 20 cadets as second lieutenants each year. 

• For training each semester, our organization spends a weekend at a training center to practice squad and pla- 
toon tactics. 

• Between junior and senior years, cadets spend six weeks at Fort Lewis, Wash., to be evaluated. 




330 



Organizations 



II 



Phi Gamma Nu 



Phi Gamma Nu is a combination of a social fraternity and a professional organization. 

Phi Gamma Nu is a diverse group of more than 100 business related majors. 

We have alumni with positions in top companies around the world. 

Phi Gamma Nu brings in professional speakers and goes on professional field trips. 

Our members work in the community, including philanthropies. 




Phi Gamma Nu: First Row: K. Williams, P. Cleary, A. 
Bhanpuri, E. Tebo, P. Duong, A. Gabriel, S. Oh, T. 
Furmanski, M. Larican, C. Metzger, A. Patel, S. Mastrangeli, 
R. Desai, E. White, S. Jhaven, T. Chang, R. Shah, S. Kalivas. 
Second Row: N. Brochman, L. Konrath, M. Myers, M. 
Fedunyszyn, T. Beiser, B. Prieto, S. Patel, K. McNeela, A. 
Reider, J. Nightengale, C. Heinrikson, P. Gurnani, K. 
Growney, S. Matthew. Third Row: B. Garcha, J. Sutor, K. 
Svoboda, S. Arora, K. Strauss, R. Uppal, K. Hammond, T. 
Eminger, F. Cobo, A. Farmer, M. Killian, N. Albin, T. Gehrt. 
Fourth Row: T. Nicole, J. Huskey, K, Naggs, R. Windy, K. 
Kucek, D. Yu, E. Burke, J. Mayer, C. Gross, A. Bmch, R. 
Maziarz. Fifth Row: S. Shiels, A. Mansukani, M. Tardy, K. 
Stanley, B. Nicklewicz, S. Miller, L. Debatin, D, Portman, T. 
Granata, J, Bordy, C. Woods, J, Nacke, E. Griffin, P Parikh. 
Sixth Row: M. Griswold, J. Wyckoff, R. Talbott, D.Covas, J. 
Khile, B. Fuller, G. Ellis, L. Mangano, M. Jankowski, P. 
Koob, J, Schumacher, A. Khorshid. 



Delta Sigma Pi 



The international fraternity of Delta Sigma Pi is a professional business fraternity of more than 90 members. 

Members share the cominon bond of brotherhood and goals of professional success. 

Our Brotherhood is strengthened through social activities such as barn dance, rose formal, canoe trip, athletic 

events and brotherhood retreats. 

Brothers volunteer their time to help community organizations such as Ace Leukemia, Champaign Park District, 

Americana Nursing Home and Cunningham Children's Home. 

Delta Sigma Pi: First Row: J. Reitzel, S. 
Catlett, B. Orkin, B. Pasdach, S. Allord, B. 
Locascio, M. Leheney, S. Wilson. Second 
Row: J. Weber, A. Linder, J. Berk, E. 
Kenner, A. Hernandez, K. Wendling, D. 
Webb, K. Getz. Third Row: J. Tomlin, K. 
Pritchett, K. Baier, N. Norton, T. Boeke, M. 
Stevens, K. Bahng, D. Craven, K. Dunn, T. 
Veluz, A. Campion, L. Grumish, H. 
McDonough, J. Carpenter, A. Gustafson, J. 
Ahrling. Fourth Row: J. Koehn, M. 
Kennedy, T. Kanke, B. Melnick, E. 
Francour, J. Carsello, J. Herold, A. Rottman, 
J. Trankina, J. Villanueva, R. Breitstein, J. 
Brown, 1. Howell, J. Green 




Organizations 



331 



orticulture Club 



1 he Horticulture Club is composed of students in several majors such as Horticulture, Ornamental Horticulture 

and Landscape Architecture, although it is open to all students with an interest in horticulture. 

The Hort Club is responsible for the Mom's Day flower show every spring where one can browse through the 

display gardens as well as purchase a variety of plant material. 

The Hort Club also puts on such activities as the fall cider sale, Christmas wreath sale and an outreach program 

where members visit nursing homes and teach residents the art of floral design. 



Hort Club: First Row: Dr. Bob 

Skirvin, Rebecca Bonner, Amey 

Maloney, Joanna Bruss. Second 

Row: Kim Zoss, Carrie Boehm, 

Keith Nowakoski, Heatlier 

Sotka, Jessica Fehrenbacher, 

Gayle Jones, Sara Rexroat. Third 

Row: Mosbah Kushad, Derek 

Schrof, Kathiyn Dieter, Tom 

Albers, Shane Kaiser, Dan 

Cargill, Mason Lyall, Rodney 

Eichen, Amanda Sosnoski, 

Joshus Hackett, Alan Perkinson, 

Russel Maulding, Scott Mozingo, 

Matthew Kregel, Jason Carr. 







M 


m^m^-tmm.^.-^ P^U 




^^^^^sk 


r^ i 




JM 


Mf WjH 




i^EUv 9^1 ^ ^ 


^Hjl 


^H iT'^iiS^^^^I 


B>- . ••-• "iMB 


'Jf ^'^ 


^^^^^H r- 


p^ JuH 




Wtk ^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^1 


h 





Association of Leisure 

and Recreation — 



It is an organization for anyone interested in the field of leisure and recreation. 

The purpose of ALR is to bring together students interested in parks, recreation or leisure service professions in 

a social atmosphere to aid their professional development in this field. 

The U of I has the top ranked recreation program in the nation. This organization works with the best. 

ALR is a casual way to get to know students, professors and other people in the field in a social setting. It also 

enables students to learn about what is happening in the field, in the department and in classes. 

Involvement and leadership in ALR is an excellent way to make contacts and gain resume experience in the 

leisure and recreation field. 

Association of Leisure and 
Recreation: First Row: social 
chair Kim Harper, public rela- 
tions Chairs Amy Katz and 
Meredith Weiss. Second Row: 
president Kathleen Axe, treasur- 
er Rosalyn Wendt, advi.sor Ken 
Bartlett. Not Pictured: vice presi- 
dent Amy Bornkamp, .social 
chair Samantha Wilson. 



332 



Organizations 




II 



The Girls 



Next Door 



The Girls Next Door is a female a cappella octet. 

The Girls Next Door represents the U of I by performing for various events sponsored by academic departments 

on campus, the Alumni Association and have recently begun to perform with the Medicare 7, 8 or 9 Dixieland 

Jazz Band. 

This year is the celebration of the group's 25th anniversary which will be commemorated in April with a reunion 

concert. 

The Girls Next Door: First 
Row: Julie Ann Larsen, Melissa 
Peterson, Stephanie Gast, 
Joyce Lee, Soraya Slymon. 
Second Row: Jen Sikich, 
Bridget O'Neill Allyson 
Drinkall. 




Varsity Men's 

Olee Club 



The Varsity Men's Glee Club is open to all male university students who care to audition and love to sing. 
» They sing all types of music from spiritual to university fight songs. 

For large shows at Krannert, they often sing along with the Women's Glee Club. 

The Varsity Men's Glee Club goes around to high schools in Illinois and is an important recmiting tool. 




Organizations 



333 



Council 



A 



1 



ich year LAS Council selects two departmental advisors for their excellent work. This particular committee of 
Kit Council is responsible for gathering student input and recommending recipients to the LAS Awards 
Committee for the LAS College Awards. 

In addition to responsibility for publicizing the Council activities, this committee is also responsible for the 
Council Newsletter. 
This group is responsible for fundraising and for special projects for the Council. 

LAS Council Members 




Paraprofessional 
Career Consultants 



Paraprofessional Career Consultants is an undergraduate peer education program. 

They use fall semester as a classroom learning experience. 

Then, Paraprofessional Career Consultants spend spring semester doing a practicum at the Career Sei-vices 

Center. 

PCCs develop the skills necessary to assist U of I students with the career exploration process. 

The Paraprofessional Career Consultant Program has served students at the University of Illinois for 18 years. 

Paraprofessional Career 

Consultants: First Row: Tom Shukas, 

Cindy Fernandez, Chantelle Key, Krista 

Kolaz, Jen Rabe, Whitney Freehill. 

Second Row: Matt Holienback, Katie 

Dunn, Stepanie Freeman, Lisa Konrath, 

Heather McDonough, Wesley Chu. 

Third Row: Chariya Christmon, Heidi 

Havener, Susie Lee, Alicia Olson. 

Fourth Row: Dennie Rogers, Sandra 

Lozano, Latoya Conner, Maria Stevens, 

.Scan Clince, Tom Thomp.son, Dave 

Hladik, Guy Davis. 



334 



Organizations 




I 



Epsilon Delta 



> Epsilon Delta promotes an awareness of current educational issues to all students who have an interest in educa- 

j tion. 

^ Epsilon Delta provides information about the teaching profession and an opportunity to find out important job- 
seeking strategies for a future career in education. 

'' Epsilon Delta promotes a sense of community within the teacher education curricula at the university and in the 

1 Champaign-Urbana area. 

; Epsilon Delta sponsors philanthropic activities which serve the children of our community. 
Epsilon Delta is an expanding organization open to all students at the University of Illinois who are interested in 

} the field of education. 

Epsilon Delta Executive 
Board and Committee 
Chairs: Jamie Rennick, 
president; Kathy Regan, 
vice president; Jill Rubin, 
secretary; Julie Benz, trea- 
surer; Shoshana Goldman, 
treasurer; Christine Warp, 
liistorian; Maggie Hail, 
recording secretary; Lori 
Caravia, fundraising; Julie 
Luebbers, fundraising; 
Sharon Rosen, initiation; 
Stefanie Langer, initiation; 
Dave Lurie, programming; 
Jacquelyn Smith, program- 
ming; Jennifer Koszyk, 
social; Jill Leone, social; 
Maureen Craig, publicity; 
Jozel Campagna, publici- 
ty; Katie Hlavach, philan- 
thropy; Katie Huston, 
philanthropy; Rosalie 
Schmitt, advisor. 





Epsilon Delta members Jamie 
Rennick, Kathy Regan, Julie 
Leubbers and Lori Caravia hold 
a fundraising raffle for gift cer- 
tificates, T-shirts and a dinner. 



Organizations 



335 




Daily Illini 
still going 

strong after 
125 years 



:■'■/.■. ^ 



Story by 
Pani Riley 
Layout by 
fill Kogan 



The Daily Illini (DI) is 
known for offering 
students the opportu- 
nity to learn the 
newspaper business. 
Since this year 
marked the 125th 
year of the Daily 
Illini, students on the 
staff got to do more than just 
cover Champaign, Urbana and 
campus news. Students got the 
chance to interact with many of 
the paper's alumni. 

The alumni activities ranged 
from the usual tent at 
Homecoming, to a brunch for 
the alumni at the Union, to an 
actual DI night where the alum- 
ni came and put out a Saturday 
morning paper. 

Staff members of the DI real- 
ized that this year has added 
something more to their DI 
experience. 

"This offers obviously some 
great experience for us," said 
Mike Cetera, junior in 
Communications and city-state 
editor. "It reminds us how 
important the DI is and how it 
is a great educational place for 
those who want to gain knowl- 
edge." 

Of course, all the extra activi- 
ties the DI has this year are 
adding to the already heavy 
work load that comes with pub- 
lishing a school paper. 

Cetera added, "There is a lot 
more work planning things for 
all the alumni that are coming 
back. We have to try and keep 
the office looking a little more 
organized than it usually does, 
but once we get to shmooze 



with the alumni it should be 
worth it." 

Other members of the staff 
like that it is the 125th anniver- 
sary because it makes them look 
at the history of the paper more 
than they would in other years. 

"I worked on researching the 
125th anniversary guide and I 
learned a lot that I wouldn't 
have if I wouldn't have had the 
assignment," said Will Leitch, 
junior in Communications and 
sports editor. 

Leitch said that it is inspiring 
to notice that these people were 
at one time doing exactly what 
he is. He was very excited this 
year when Roger Ebert spoke 
because Leitch also wants to be 
a movie critic. 

Even though it is a lot of 
work, everyone on the DI staff 
seems to agree that the 125th 
anniversary just enhances the 
excitement that comes with 
their jobs. 

Ali Gerakiaris, sophomore in 
LAS, realizes that despite the 
celebration, the DI has given 
her skills that are more impor- 
tant than the fact she works for 
a newspaper with such a good 
reputation. 

"I've really learned how the 
news works. I've fine tuned my 
writing skills so I can someday 
get a job outside of here," 
Gerakiaris said. 

It is clear that even after the 
125th year of making newspa- 
pers, the DI will continue to 
provide education for its stu- 
dents and at the same time 
bring the news to thousands of 
readers daily. 



336 



Groups and Greeks 



«feafe; 





c 



ity -State Editor Mike 
Cetera, junior in 
Communications, spends 
every afternoon writing 
and editing stories for the 
next day's paper. The com- 
pleted paper is sent to the 
press every night around 
midnight. 



J. hotographer Ryan 
Smith prints some photos 
in the Dl's darkroom. 
Every day photographers 
for the DI shoot assign- 
ments ranging from sports 
events to performances to 
breaking news. 



Seth Davidow 



Scth Davidow 



Daily illini 



337 




men's Glee Club 



• The Women's Glee Club brings together students of diverse backgrounds and areas of study sharing in their 
common interest of music. 

• Dr. Joe Grant, chairperson of the music education division, is in his 14th year as the conductor of the Women's] 
Glee Club. His personable style and high quality of musicianship provide an enjoyable learning atmosphere. 

• We are continuing the celebration of our 100th year anniversary. 

• This group has toured throughout the state of Illinois and across the country including Washington, D.C. 

• The Women's Glee Club consists of 67 women. Six officers represent the group. They are Joycelynn Trask 

(President), Julie Ann Larsen (Vice President), Lisa Guerra (Treasurer), Chris Piatek (Secretary), Lelah Beasley 
(Librarian) and Jennifer Isenberg (Historian). 

Women's Glee Club: First Row: Julie 

Ann Larsen, Lelah Beasley, Chris Piatek, 

Joycelynn Trask, Jennifer Isenberg, Lisa 

Guerra. Second Row: Deepa Rajkarne, 

Amy Kuebel, Krista Motley, Laura 

Moglia, Amy Johnson, Katie Lechner. 

Third Row: Rey-Wuei Huang. Molly 

Roller. Alicia Verdier, Karen Brook, 

Joanne Chung, Gail Bianchi. Fourth 

Row: Julie Reinish, Kara Krumdick. 

Emily Bally, Stacia Martin, Amy 

Palmreuter, Anne Sokolowski. Fifth 

Row: Celia Weeks, Stephanie Gast, Stacy 

Kuznitsky, Jennie Lee, Allyson Drinkall, 

Bridget O'Neill. Sixth Row: Gemma 

Wall Sarah Smalley, Deb Hill, Beth 

Watkins, Sara Langley, Meryl Ibis. 

Seventh Row: Erin Grant, Marie 

Graziano, Karen Petroskey, LaShawn 

King, Lee Drinan, Meghan Curran. 

Eighth Row: Anne Nosko, Christine 

Haupt, Kara Baier, Katie Brandt, Karen 

Fleming, Soraya Slymon. Ninth Row: 

Heather Watt. Jennifer Greene, Amy 

Noel Hall, Tristan Toland, Jeannie 

Bianchi. Tenth Row: Director Dr. Joe 

Grant. Amanda Braid, Kelli Trei, Ana 

Ravestein, Jen Sikich, Accompanist Mark 

Farris. Not Picture: Sharon Bender. 

Jocelyn Fischer, Molly Gaumer, Leah 

Glomski, Patricia Hamill, Brenda 

Kietzman, Joyce Lee. Leslie Malone. 

Melissa Peterson, Sarah Reinert, Katerina 

Somers. 




338 Organizations 



The Other Guys 



The group has been an a cappella tradition since 1969. 

It consists of eight men who arrange their own music, choreograph their own performances and do all their own 

stunts. 

The Other Guys have traveled throughout the United States and Europe, serving as ambassadors for the 

University of Illinois. 

The group's performances are a fascinating combination of high quality singing and lighthearted comedy. 
The group is the IHSA 8th grade basketball champions. 




he Other Guys: First Row: Dave Wagner, Dave Reader, Andrew Goldberg, Justin Strackany. Second Row: Ryan Behling, Brad Haag, 
dam Wengert, Brian Siedband. 



ORGANIZATIONS 339 




I 



African- 
American 
sororities 
unite during 
Sista Sista 
Week 



Story by 

Anne Peterson 

Layout by 

Jill Kogan 



hree African- 
American sororities 
on campus, Sigma 
Gamma Rho, Zeta 
Phi Beta and Delta 
Sigma Theta, joined 
togetiier to celebrate 
thie first annual sis- 
terhood week from 
Oct. 8 through Oct. 14. 

Ane Kidd, senior in LAS and 
first vice president of Delta 
Sigma Theta, said, 'The purpose 
of Sista Sista Week was to 
strengthen the bonds between 
the three African American 
Sororities. And, most important- 
ly, recognize October as it is 
across the nation, as AIDS 
Awareness Month." 

The celebration began on the 
evening of Sunday, Oct. 9. The 
three sororities united for the 
first time that week. They start- 
ed out the sisterhood events by 
making ribbons with the differ- 
ent colors of each sorority. 
Throughout the week, the rib- 
bons were worn in honor of 
Sista Sista Week. 

Kidd stated, "The main focus 
on Sunday was to help cement 
the bonds of sisterhood since 
we're all working for the same 
cause." 

Monday, a sorority forum was 
held. The forum was open to any 
woman who wished to attend. 

The rest of the week was filled 
with events such as a trip to 
Greek Granduer, an African- 
American owned store that spe- 
cializes in greek paraphenalia. 

On Wednesday, the sororities 
expressed their concern for the 
AIDS epidemic and unsafe sex, 
as AIDS literature and condoms 



were distributed to the public in 
the south foyer of the Illini 
Union. 

Sanya Gool, service chair for 
Zeta Phi Beta and senior in LAS, 
said, "We chose to pass out con- 
doms and AIDS literature 
because we felt it was our duty 
and obligation to educate the 
students about AIDS and pro- 
tecting themselves." 

The concern for AIDS was 
expressed further as the sorori- 
ties held a canshake on the 
Quad on Friday, Oct. 13. The 
canshake was used to raise 
money for the AIDS Pastoral 
Care Network which is a founda- 
tion that gives support to AIDS 
patients who have been turned 
away from their churches. 

Friday night was the highlight 
of the week as a successful 
African-American woman who 
had appeared on the cover of 
Essence Magazine came to talk 
to the young woman about the 
AIDS virus. 

Kidd stated, "She gave us a 
real alert of just how threaten- 
ing the AIDS virus issue is today. 
It was food for thought for 
many college students." 

Michelle Miller, service chair 
in Delta Sigma Theta and senior 
in LAS, stated, "Overall, the 
entire week was very productive. 
It built a foundation for the 
togetherness felt between the 
three sororities. Also, Sista Sista 
Week was effective for letting 
the students see the leadership 
roles we play on campus." 

Gool effectively summed the 
entire week when she simply 
stated, "It was a beautiful expe- 
rience." 



340 



Greeks and Organizations 




A 



member ofZeta Phi 
Beta sorority participates 
in a canshake on the 
Quad on Friday, Oct. 13. 
The canshake was used to 
raise money for the AIDS 
Pastoral Care Network, 
which is a foundation 
that gives support to AIDS 
patients who have been 
turned away from their 
churches. 



Dave Moser 



SisTA SisTA Week 



341 




Wan Da 



-la Wan Da is an honorary society that recognizes seniors who have displayed excellence in leadership posi- 
iions, activitites, academics and service to the university community. 

At the time the organization was founded in 1912, Ma Wan Da was specifically for men, but in 1986 it merged 
with Shorter Board and became co-educational. 

This year. Ma Wan Da members have focused on passing on knowledge that they have gained through their 
experiences at the University of Illinois to freshmen students. 

Ma Wan Da members have spoken to freshmen First Year Impact groups about how to get involved on campus 
and have given presentations at freshmen leadership conferences on a variety of topics. 



Ma Wan Da 
Executive Board: 

First Row: Heather 

Kelmachter, co-tapping 

chair; Shannon 

Tebben, secretaiy. 

Second Row: Rhonda 

Kirts, advisor; Jennifer 

Cox, president; Laurie 

Slithers, co-tapping 

chair; Jennifer Flynn, 

vice president. 



342 



Ma Wan Da: First Row: Frin 

Bavougian, Margaret Webster, 

Shannon Tebben. Second Row: 

Jennifer Flynn, Erica Bown, Amy 

Hill, Lyn Debatin, Dennie 

Rogers. Third Row: Beth 

Richards, Heather Kelmachter, 

Casey Garza. Fourth Row: 

Andrea Peck, Jennifer Cox, 

Amanda Benson, April Haenitch, 

Laurie Suthers, Lisa Seilheimer, 

Kathryn Stokes, Ben Wong, Bi 

Shibla. Not Pictured: Reed 

Berger, Dana Berk, William 

Bodine, Chris Crawforc 

Rebekah Frese, Daniel Gerbasi, 

Malt (joben, Sivaraja 

Kuppsiivvami, Matthw Lloyd, 

'I'ricia Marino, Malt Ma.ssucci, 

Ja.son Silcox, Kathryn Stokes, 

Ilakung Wong. 

Organizations 




Illinois 
=Technograph 



The Illinois Technograph is the independent engineering magazine of the University of Illinois, and is part of the 
lUini Media Company. The magazine features articles about people in engineering, engineering research and top- 
ics of interest to engineering students. 

Four regular issues of the Illinois Technograph are published each year. Additionally, two special issues, the 
Engineering Open House Guide and the Engineering Survival Guide for new engineering students, are published 
in the spring. 

The staff of the Technograph is composed entirely of students, including writers, sales representatives, photogra- 
phers, designers, a business manager and editors. 

Circulation of regular issues is 5,000 to 6,000 copies distributed on the U of I campus and beyond. Copies of 
each regular issue are mailed to nearly 1,000 high schools in Illinois. The EOH issue is distributed to ten thou- 
sand students and visitors and the Engineering Survival Guide is mailed to high school seniors who have been 
accepted to the U of I engineering programs. 

The Technograph is an award-winning magazine. In 1994-95 is was judged the third best college magazine in 
the nation by the Society of Professional Journalists. 

Illinois Technograph: First 
Row: Joetta Bohman. Second 
Row: Carmen Hernandez, Jee 
Suh, Johanna Canniff, Third Row: 
Dar-Lon Chang, Kaushal Gupta, 
Brian Hart. Fourth Row: Arwin 
Levinson, David Eldridge, Don 
Baron. Fifth Row: Aaron 
Levinson, David Lemmiehirt, 
Kevin Bollman, Ashish Pandya, 
Brian Swan. 





Members of the Illinois 
Technograph discuss the 
next issue. Editor in 
Chief Joetta Bohman 
talks over ideas with 
staff members Arwin 
Levinson, David Eldridge 
and Brian Hart. 



Organizations 



343 




107.1 The 
Planet gains 
recognition 

as the 
number one 
modern rock 

station in 
the country 



Story by 

Pam Riley 

Layout by 

Ramiro Nava 



he Planet was 
able to start 
off 1995 
boasting the 
fact they are 
the number 
one modern 
rock radio sta- 
tion in the country. Arbitron, 
which is the equivalent to the 
Neilson rating system for televi- 
sion, was the company that 
ranked the station number one 
in radio. 

"It's such a honor for a station 
run by college students to beat 
out some of the biggest stations 
in the country/' said Jay 
Schulman, junior in 
Communications and program- 
ming director. 

The fact that the station is 
number one in the country 
means more to businesses that 
advertise with the Planet. Many 
members of the Planet staff were 
happy with the ratings because of 
all the competition in the area. 

"It was really cool to see us do 
so well considering we have 
more competition on the market 
now," said Ben Ponzio, junior in 
LAS and student sales manager. 
The experience at the Planet 
has even made Ponzio decide to 
go into radio sales for his career. 
He knows being the sales man- 
ager of the number one station 
in the country will help him 
find a job. 

"I'm positive it will help me. 
I'm able to graduate from the U 
of I knowing no one else can 
have more experience than me. 
The best anyone else can say is 
that they have a 5.0, but I have 
the experience," Ponzio added. 
But the rating means a lot to 



more people than the program- 
ming director and the sales 
manager. Many students who 
once worked at the station are 
now employed at other stations 
thanks to their experience at the 
station. 

Jamie Marchiori, who worked 
in the on-air department, left 
the Planet during the fall semes- 
ter of this year to work at 96.3 
the Edge in Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Marchiori graduated from the 
College of Communications, but 
said he owes much of what he 
has learned to the Planet. 

"The Planet exists to give stu- 
dents an opportunity to learn 
things different from that of the 
classroom," Marchiori said. 
"They not only learn how to use 
the equipment, but the capabili- 
ties of the equipment." 

Marchiori realizes that the sta- 
tion's new rating will help more 
students with future careers. 

"The idea is once people who 
want jobs leave they will get 
noticed," Marchiori added. "The 
fact that the station has done so ' 
well the ratings just brings more 
publicity to it and people in the 
industry know what it's about." 

The station has made many 
changes from the days when 
people joked it was just a bunch 
of kids spinning records in a 
dorm's basement. Now it has a 
better location in the communi- 
ty and state of the art equip- 
ment to provide better quality 
and experience. One thing 
remains the same. Besides just 
being a place of business the 
Planet becomes much more to 
many people. 

"It's been my home for the 
kist four years," said Marchiori. 



344 



Greeks and Organizatons 




M 



idday disc jockey Jeff 
Wolf, senior in 
Communications, raps to 
his listeners and prepares 
to play some music. 
Arbitron recently ranked 
WPGIJ as the number one 
modern rock radio station 
in the country. 




Paul (irano 



lanetgate tailgaters stand in front of the 
Planet bus. The fact that the station is num- 
ber one means more to businesses that adver- 
tise with the Planet. 



rr. 



uring a Planetgate performance, local band 
Suede Chain entertains the audience. WPGU 
sponsors many events on and off campus. 



WPGU 



345 



anhellenic 
uncil^^ 



m 



'.'■"■'/■ 






.1, .. v^.ii Panhellenic was awarded the National Panhellenic Conference 1995 Outstanding Scholarship Award for 
ihe most outstanding Panhelenic Scholarship program in the nation. 

Panhellenic was awarded the 1995 TIS Outstanding Student Organization for its contribution to the campus and 
community. 

Adopt-a-School, a tutoring program co-sponsored by Panhellenic, received recognition for being one of the top 
20 Adopt-a-School programs in the nation. 

Panhellenic consists of 23 chapters and approximately 3,000 women. It is governed by an executive board, 
which consists of a president and eight vice presidents, and the Panhellenic Council, which is made up of a rep- 
resentative from each chapter. 

Panhellenic excels in the areas of scholarship and community service. The all-sorority grade point average is 
consistently above the all women's average, and the Greek community donated more than 15,000 hours of com- 
munity service and $25,000 last year. 

Panhellenic Council: First Row: Heather Parmelee, 
vice president of public information; Heatlier 
Kelmachter, vice president of scholarship; Kathy 
Parsons, vice president of membership; Tina Green, 
Panhellenic President. Second Row: Craig Jackson, 
Greek Advisor; Marie O'Connor, greek advisor; Laurie 
Suthers, vice president of membership education; 
Rebecca Milligan, vice president of finance; Dana 
Ingrassia, vice president-internal; Ann Schmitz, judicial 
board chain^'oman; Heather Rastorfer, vice president- 
external. 



346 



Organizations 




II 



Pre-Law Club 



Benefits of Pre-Law Clul:) membership include The Gavel, the Pre-Law Club's newsletter, which features articles 
about club activities, law school information and news about current issues in the legal profession. 
We hold monthly meetings with speakers from different areas of the legal profession and related fields. 
They also hold the Mock LSAT, a practice exam under similar conditions to the real test. 
Pre-Law Club offers qualification for membership in Phi Alpha Delta, the Pre-Law Honorary. 
The Pre-Law Club holds social activities, involvement in committees and much more. 




re-Law Club: First Row: Binal Joslii, Neha Sampat. Second Row: Beth Hickey, Neil Kraetsch. Third Row: Sherry Mundorff, Brenda 
haffer, Aaron Dyer, Sam Gullo, Julia Warner, Laura Chambers. 



Organizations 



347 



Shi-ai 



Shi-ai Members: First Row: 

S. Bishop, H. Chapman, E. 

Buchman, C. Berman, A. 

Stevensen, J. O'Donnell, D. 

Ingrassia. Second Row: D. 

Russo, E. Neuhaus, A. 

Braverman, J. Serlin, K. 

Lesters, A. Anspach, J. Mihr, 

T. Johnson. Third Row: A. 

Nativi, J. Schumacher, T. 

Buedek, E. Maki. Fourth 

Row: S. Chase, B. Carlson, 

A. Schneider, J. VanWinkle, 

J. Holland. Fifth Row: M. 

Janas, A. Granzbell, E. 

Hawker, T. Yurku, J. Lasser, 

L. Horvath, N. Stack, D. 

Kaiser, K. Priest. Sixth Row: 

A. Bunselmeyer, J. Koerte, 

K. Garfield, L. Krajecki. 







Women's Golf 



Women's Golf 

Team: (left to 

right) Jacqueline 

Rubin, Ashley 

Webb, Jillian 

Sitter, Kourtney 

Mulcahy, Karen 

Karmazin, Kristie 

Treseler, Andrea 

Cowell, Michelle 

Lin, Coach Paula 

Smith. 




348 



Organizations 



star Course 



Star Course is a completely student-run concert organization that brings rock bands to campus. 

It is made up of approximately 90 student staff members and is headed by a group of nine junior managers and 



First semester, Star Course rocked U of I with such shows as Matthew Sweet, Elastica, BoDeans and Natalie 
Merchant. 

Star Course Staff: First Row: 
L. Kay, A. Talbert, N. Hamid, 
N. Webster, S. Lipinski, A. 
Russell, D. Levy, J. Hargave, M. 
Calkins, M. Bell, J. Larsen, L. 
Burnett, S. Hayes, S. Niemayer. 
Second Row: M. Angrio, K. 
Brumund, B. Krisel, S. 
Katsaros, J. Cuailewski, B. 
Quigley, D. Harrison, C. 
Crawford, P. Fuller, P. Liebman, 
B. Bischmann, M. Murphy. 
Third Row: M. Hatfield, R. 
Parker, B. Patano, L. Sutti. M. 
Keaney, N. Rockwood, S. 
Hage, J. Blouin, J. Dayon, J. Li, 
R. Crawford, A. Gibson, R. 
Harris, A. Reese, M. May, L. 
Coy, K. Dixon. Fourth Row: 
D. Gazdic, A. Pawlak, V. 
Grazulis, E. Chung, D. 
Peterson, E. Feurer, N. Boehm, 
A. Scaeffer, M. Dressel, D. 
Figatner, J. Major, C. jepson, B. 
Bobyk, S. Labahn, R. Mishra. 




Organizations 349 




^f''y. 



William 

Olson 

decides to 

leave after 

28 years of 

service 



Story by 

Pain Riley 

Layout by 

Stephanie Fritcher 



any people are big fans of 
the Varsity Men's Glee 
Club and attend their 
concerts regularly. After 
this year the audience 
may notice something 
different about their 
shows — the director. 
William Olson, who has been 
director of the Varsity Men's 
Glee Club for the past 28 years, 
has decided that this would be 
his last year. 

Most members of the club 
realize Olson will be missed. "In 
my eyes this man is a legend," 
said Andy Goldberg, senior in 
LAS and president of the club 
this year. He believes one of the 
reasons why Olson is so great is 
because of the traditions Olson 
started. For example, at the end 
of the Big Ten melody, Olson 
invites old members to come on 
stage. Goldberg thinks this adds 
a lot to the performance. "It's 
amazing how many people 
come back on Dad's Day and 
during large events to sing 
along," said Goldberg. 

Goldberg is trying to make 
this year as special as possible 
for Olson. He has made some 
plans to put out a CD of the 
Glee Club singing Olson's 
favorite songs. He also has made 
engagements so the club can 
tour more this year. 

Olson says the thing he will 
miss most about directing the 
Varsity Men's Glee Club is the 
men. "They are exciting to be 
around. They are young and 
energetic and it sort of rubs off 
on you," said Olson. 

Of course, Olson will also miss 
making the music, but he said 



he will still be attending shows 
next year. One of the main rea- 
sons he has decided to leave is 
because he wants to do more 
traveling with his wife. "I've 
always wanted to go to Alaska 
and Australia," commented 
Olson. Olson also wanted to 
spend time with his grand- 
daughter. 

Under Olson's 28 years of 
directing the Varsity Men's Glee 
Club, the a cappella group, the 
Other Guys was started. Most U 
of I students are familiar with 
this group because they sing at 
school activities and put on 
their own concerts. Olson said 
their should be no worries for 
this groups survival. "The Other 
Guys pretty much run them- 
selves. They do their own 
music. They rehearse it and are 
pretty much on their own," 
said Olson. 

With all these traditions 
under Olson's belt it will be 
interesting to see what happens 
with a new director next year. 
Some Glee Club members do 
not think that the switch will be 
that difficult even though audi- 
ences are used to his format. "I 
think it might be hard at first, 
but a lot of the older guys who 
are used to how the club works 
under Professor Olson, will be 
leaving with him," said Dave 
Wagner, senior in FAA. "The 
music school is losing a good 
person and a cool guy." 

Only after seeing a concert 
performed by the Varsity Men's 
Glee Club next year will one be 
able to see how the impact of a 
new director may change how 
the club works. 



350 



Greeks and Organizations 





1. iano performance 
major and Glee Club 
accompanist Brad Haag 
concentrates on playing. 
His role in keeping time 
and providing chordal 
melody is essential to the 
performance. 



I>, 



irector William Olson 
leads the Glee Club in a 
rendition of "Mary Had a 
Baby." Olson's directing 
style can often be very 
energetic. 



Varsity Men's Glee Club 



351 



student 
overnment Association 







The Student Government Association is the official voice of the University of Illinois' student body. 

We act as representatives on campus-wide comittees. 

The Student Government Association lobbies Springfield and Washington to protect student rights. 
We deal with student concerns such as financial aid, student fees and campus safety. 
The Student Government Association expresses official student stance on issues such as the Chief and 

Affirmative Action. 



I 



■ ;•■ '■<<■■' 

■"-' :■•'< 




Student Government Association Members: 

Steve Graclman, Joe Cvviklinski, Gate Munson, 

Ivelissa Rodriguez, Henoc Eriik, Kali Thomas, 

Kartik Tamhane, Doug Wojcie.sczak, Mike 

Barett, Shanon Tebben, Steve Deiiie, Patty 

DeFilly, (ulic Riccardi, Lisa RosenField. Honn 

Alitto, Melissa Randel, Andrea Andetson, M.in 

Jane Potthoff, Beth Daily, Jeffrey Remotigui. 

Kelli Harsch, Joy McMillon, Adedej Akinkunle. 

Dorthy Moe, Dwayne Da\ i^ 



352 



ORGANIZATIONS 



II 




The students of the University of Illinois at Urbana- 

Champaign establish and formally recognize the Student 

Government Association (SGA) and charge the SGA with 

authority and responsibility to represent and act in our 

collective interest. 



Organizations 353 



I 



I 



Greeks and Organizations 



Kj?ppa Sigma' s Athletics 

i\.-4.»,'a :5i;4iiia's biggest loving cup was won 
by the active chapter in 1925 wlien it cap- 
tured the university basketball champi- 
onship. The fraternity had a histoiy of ath- 
letic achievement from its start on the cam- 
pus. Following the removal of anti-fraternity 
restrictions at the U of I, Kappa Sigma was 
the first fraternity to come back to the cam- 
pus. Their charter was granted on Oct. 15, 
1891. Their first chapter, Alpha Gamma, 
came into official existence a month later 
when its first members were taken into the 
fraternity under the guidance of Robert 
Lackey. Ten years earlier, in 1881, the 
trustees of the U of I, then known as the 
Illinois Industrial University, had abolished 
Greek letter societies from the campus by 
requiring matriculates to sign pledges not to 
become members of such groups while stu- 
dents at the institution. Previous to that 
time. Delta Tau Delta and Sigma Chi had 
brief existences on the campus but because 
of the ruling were forced to disband. The 
required pledges were known as "iron 
clads," a famous term. 

Fraternity Life 

The University of Wisconsin at Madison 
published a brochure in I960 called 
"Fraternity Life at Wisconsin." The focus 
was on how the college fraternity could 
be the center of social life. The brochure 
included this picture of Duke Ellington 
who had entertained at one of the frater- 
nity formals the year before and was 
one of the hits of the year. Besides 
showcasing special fraternity events, fra- 
ternity life at Wisconsin told members 
the definitions of a pledge, rush and fra- 
ternity policy. Fraternity advantages 
included the encouragement of competi- 
tion, good citizenship, financial strength 
and integrity. At this time, U of W frater- 
nity initiation fees, including badge and 
national magazine, averaged $75, but the 
c(jst was paid only once and dorm rales 
at the time where only $40 to $70. 




354 



Greeks and Organizations 



II 



Purdue's "The Greek " 



r 



*^THE/^REEK 



^ 



ToiMB* 1. JiuBtwr 1 



*fi.1 liri)Wt»>. rwJiifj 4T»t 



Sigs, Kappas Treat Children 



Non-Greek Letter Houses 
Pay Ind. Property Taxes 



b»: I>1CK »UlSTUt 
Acacu, runlwuse, %ui TTl> 
lACl* Enlvnuucs omr pi) i pro- 
prrt) Ui lu U)4 tlalr p)t»nuB««l, 
«tilU kll CrrckL-Uttrr frAtrnutttt 
trr rx«nl4 fioir. ttus stjiv tax. 
This proMpni of Laiiac aU fri- 
l<-rmlirfc «n-n( Cr»«k.t««« Irm- 
trnuli^K wUI be <2UKtus*d aloac 
«tUi olhrr tu <ft9SUOBS u Ik^ 

atjply k) rnurottus a) ite ^»ul 
ir.M(la( of ttM ChapUT AlMwri 
Assoctatloe and a* Pr«iMcftt's 
Council of liw IFC. TW mvvttBC 
la to b* h^ld IQ Oh- «*$i family 
lo<a(t ot the Memorial I'aluo tm 
Wdkwdai, Not. 9. 

na PmnlaW't Cotact) bu Is- 
TIM aa lu fwats aU rntaraltr 
adnaara for a <llBfli»r uxi a dta- 
cnasloa atacloti conmmn^ tax«a 
MMl hnv fralfnufti^ ar« aIT«ctf4 
t\ tjp!i..TV« N r»Twl B|*ai*ir for 
' ■ K. I*. .Slv*ar1, 
I wi Tn'as- 
'-■■'■ 




As trrasurvr h»r» at fiaottf, 
Strvarl pigaawad ftf theory a4 
oparatac ttt iBtT>rrattyflaa"t<ay- 
otr buu: aaa u, ke adncaMd 
tlv aaUlK o( tnada by n> an- 
Inrslty la bafr aavvort Haalf 
rattier tttaa lo d iw i j cstlraly m 
(raala trpm local, state, and M- 
•ral pmerviDeata, II «aa hit ef- 
kifU to Oua nald Hial eataUlaka< 
bin aa oaa of )te satiaaftl laaders 
tAlba area otcoUete maMtameat 

After more 1^a« ttm* tfaeatea 
of talKatail aereK* to Pal4M 
lue*rtlty. Stewart r««lr«d tron 
tfie talferuty stall and u today 
iMd of Oie IMMaa State Tu 
CoaMaMOL As a rnirif<ailTe 
01 ll» csBBUMea, Stmit win 
Veak o« Bh Mblect o< laiea 
and tw tbey affect traterttl>te«. 

Slenrt l>u Imb ttrmnc for ^ 
tedalalaoB la tbe Kale aaaemld 
tn |«I dme traleraitMaado 
Ukr oms o« ISie Kin> t 
" ■*- l.rert.lrtlw I 




Purdue first published "The 
Greek" in 1966. Taken around 
Halloween, the picture on the 
cover of "The Greek" was of 
Sigma Chi and Kappa Kappa 
Gamma entertaining 35 Gary 
Home children with an ice 
cream party at the Sigma Chi 
house. The festivities included 
apple dunking and dancing. It is 
obvious that today philanthropy 
is a big part of Big Ten Greek 
life, and it has its roots estab- 
lished far back in the past. Other 
articles featured in "The Greek" 
included information on proper- 
ty taxes, IFC Honors Banquets, 
fraternities staying national and 
a Lutheran fraternity that started 
accepting honoraiy members. 
Information regarding social 
events was on the inside. 



Happiness is Belonging 

Penn State's sorority system started in 1929. 
This picture from "Happiness is Belonging" 
was taken in 1929. The Associated Press 
published an article titled "Penn State Frowns 
on Fraternity Girls" on Jan. 23, 1971, in the 
Washington Star. Two girls moved into a fra- 
ternity at this time, and the Penn State 
University administration no longer recog- 
nized it as one of the campus fraternities. 
The girls said they wanted to check out 
sororities, but they did not offer the girls 
what they were looking for because the 
members lived in dorms. 




Big Ten 355 



■J ••>: 




Waa-Mu Show 

•-orthwestern puts on an annual 
■' ''V' nity/Sorority show similar to the 
Kiicm of the U of I campus. In 

vaa-Mu Show was called 
icnse. Taken from the book you 
J when you arrived at the show, 
rure is from a little ditty called 
)ii to Nudity." Other skits included 
-a rni:»ute to Hugh Heffner called "What 
would we do without Hugh?," featuring a 
giant playboy bunny logo. Two years 
later, the 1971 show was criticized by a 
student w^ho noted that there was only 
one black student in the show, and he 
was offstage in the band. At this time, 
the student who complained referred to 
Northwestern as the "great white liberal 
university." The 1971 Waa-Mu show was 
aired on a nationwide broadcast. 



Hell Week 



In 1940 Ohio State University published a 
pamphlet titled "Life in the Fraternities at Ohio 
State University." This was the first time the 
school declared that the campus abolish Hell 
Week. It made the claim that fraternities that 
wanted to promote the physical maltreatment 
of pledges in any form needed to be strictly 
prohibited. The prohibition was to help mem- 
bers to improve systems as a whole. Like 
many Big Ten schools, the pamphlet also 
stressed involvement in athletics. This picture 
was an action shot in Ohio's 1939 game 
against Missouri. The emphasis on sports is 
apparent, and the article even considered 
Greek life as athletics to be a major part in a 
man's transformation into adulthood, using 
"from High-School youth to College-Bred 
man" to describe the change into adulthood 
one person makes when entering college. 




356 



Greeks and Organizations 



I 




Politics 

The University of Michigan made a politi- 
cal statement in 1950, supporting Truman 
in the Truman vs. Dewey election. 
Although founded at Penn State in 1852, 
Phi Kappa Psi started at University of 
Minnesota in 1876. To some, being Greek 
at a Big Ten school meant making politi- 
cal decisions as well as supporting the 
football team. 




Alpha Tau Omega 

Members of Alpha Tau Omega made history at the U of I 
when their headquarters moved away from campus last year. 
It was also making news at Indiana University in 1994, 
because it was the first time the fraternity raised its letters 
since 1992. The fraternity had been disbanded from the cam- 
pus in the spring of 1992 for hazing practices. A pledge of 
the fraternity became intoxicated and was admitted to 
Bloomington Hospital. No members from the 1992 chapter 
were allowed in the chapter. This meant that all members 
had to be new. ATOs had to eliminate pledging from the 
chapter, have a non-student house director residing in the 
house and keep the house drug free. This picture is of U of 
I members in front of their house. ATOs are usually consid- 
ered to have one of the best-kept houses on campus. They 
started off this year by painting the new house and laying 
new sod. 



Derby Days 



The U of I is not the only univer- 
sity to have a Sigma Chi Derby 
Days. Derby Days is Sigma Chi's 
philanthropy and one of the more 
popular Greek activities on cam- 
pus. Fraternities and sororities 
come to compete against each 
other. The Derby Days at Penn 
State were held to benefit the 
Ronald McDonald house. 




Big Ten 



357 



The Minnesota Daily! 

Big Ten school usually meant having a good 
r^wsnaper. This may be considered cjuite a 
ig that most college papers consisted 
ely of students who serve as reporters, 
.-:, piiotographers and graphic artists. Many even 
ri:dents that deal with aclvertising and business 
liC paper. The Minnesota Daily boasted as 
ixj'it; tiie world's largest college-circulated paper 
ii-om 1900 to 1950. At the U of I, the Daily Illini is 
consistently ranked as one of the best newspapers of 
its kind. It is celebrating its 125th anniversary this 
year. Its main competitor is the student run newspa- 
per at Northwestern University, also a Big Ten 
school. It has been rumored that these two schools 
shared the title of first place at the annual Illinois 
College Press Association Conference in Chicago. In 
1995, the Daily Illini had the title. j^ 

Marching Bands 3 




E 



StV Uttttt^finta Sailg 



r-uwytMirir'ot umNfatit, 




ZONING BILL PASSES SENATE 



Committee Tables Measure Abolishing Compulsory ^^7/''^'!™^™*™^ 

WOlilO Bt «AOF ._,,«.,.. C... gllLMAVUKlD 

iirmnuBvuwl #.i^ ! cinmna 



7. ^^W^^ifej^^ 



tnTumiiTOBkcm 



5UW.«T> U) !'>«(ltIW 



L 




Another p^TOrneing a Big Ten school is halviftg a marchiftg 
band. Michigan's band gave its first show on the home field 
in 1898 and are still going strong. In addition to performing 
at home and away football games, the marching band plays 
concerts and joins other university bands in Band-o-Rama. 
Traditional songs are played most often, but jazz, classical 
and popular selections are commonly added for variety. 
Michigan has the tradition of forming into the block M which 
only allowed 225 people to participate, so competition 
increased among band members. The U of I marching band 
presently has its own CD out on the market. It also has a 
mix of traditional songs and more modern pieces. For exam- 
ple, besides the traditional fight songs, you can hear the 
band's rendition of "Just a Gigolo," or you can groove to the 
infamous "Beer Cheer." The marching band at U of I per- 
formed at many school events. This year they performed at 
the New Student Convocation. 

National Honor Societwi 

One thing that all Big Ten schools have in commorT 
societies. The Golden Key National Honor Society is one group 
that is located on many different college campuses throughout 
the countiy. To get an invitation to the society one must be a 
junior or senior in the top 15 percent of his or her class. Once 
a member of the organization, students get to apply for scholar- 
ships which are awarded on the local and national level. The 
club stresses the recognition and encouragement of scholastic 
excellence among students from all fields of study. Golden Key 
members provide services to the university and the community 
by performing various activities. The picture was from the 
induction ceremony at Purdue. The ceremony was one of the 
highlights of the year for the members, both past and present. 




onor 




158 



Greeks and Organizations 






ROTfft # 



In 1969, U.S. News & World Report ran a fea- 
ture stoiy on what ROTC meant at Indiana 
University and all Big Ten campuses. At that 
time, the ROTC was in danger of personal 
attacks by anti-military students and faculty. 
These questions were rooted in the United 
States' involvement in Vietnam. The article 
tried to answer the question, why Big Ten 
universities should be teaching militaiy sub- 
jects if war itself was immoral. At that time, 
an Indiana student who needed 122 hours to 
graduate registered for ROTC courses that 
contributed 16 hours to students who took 
them. A few militant students and some fac- 
ulty members at the time asked for elimina- 
tion of ROTC from the campus curriculum or 
at least demanded a denial of academic cred- 
it for ROTC classes. The chancellor at the 
time, Dr. Byrum E. Carter, went on record 
saying that ROTC would be retained with 
credit. This picture showed Air Force ROTC 
members at the U of I preparing to receive 
the flag at sundown outside of the Armory^ 



Student Government Association 

All Big Ten schools had to find a way to get the con- 
cerns of students heard. Student Government 
Association, SGA, is usually the governing body of the 
student population. At Penn State, SGA sponsors an 
array of events and services that reach a large group of 
students, faculty and staff. In 1989, the Penn State year- 
book reported on how the saident government spon- 
sored the Penn State Harrisburg yearbook, Capitalite, 
and its newspaper. Capital Times. SGA also funded two 
yearly leadership conferences and all campus clubs and 
organizations at Penn State that year. At the U of I, 
every student has to pay a fee to the SGA. It is included 
with all student fees and is refundable during a certain 
time at the beginning of the semester. This picture was 
of the SGA at U of I in 1982. 





:entennl^ 




Big Ten 



359 



I 



r 





y.^'^e 



i'l 




fli 1 


it 


m 


^^^^^B ^^H 


B '^ 


^H > H 


fiKi 


■f |B 1 


^^B 


^m^^^m*'. 9H^ 


^ 


rA 


«^ ^'- 








^HBp 






I^H'^ J 


iV 




i 


■i] 








^H * f 


|H 




I 




I I ^ 




J 




|l| 




Ll 


^^■M'^B 


i! 





\ vi 



^. 




Q raduates 

Amie Megginson, Editor 

Life is made up of many different experiences whicli add spice and 
excitement throughout the years. Each new encounter that we 
experience ma]<es up one piece of the puzzle of life. When they were 
looked at one piece at a time they were interesting, but if all of the 
pieces were placed in their fitted places and looked at as a whole, more 
than likely a beautiful mosaic would appear. The picture represents 
the past, while the future is still to be formed. If you look closely at the 
picture, you can see a tiny area that represents the years spent at the 
University of Illinois. 

The transition from living at home with parents to being free and 
staying in an environment inundated with young adults fighting for a 
chance in the working world can often be difficult at first, but is also 
a time of learning, adapting and growing. 

Students come to the university from all parts of the world to 
further their education. The knowledge and training received from 
classes and extracurricular activities will help to prepare the students 
for jobs after graduation. Nearly everyone hopes to be successful and 
strives to get good grades while they are here learning what they can, 
but there is a lot more to college life than putting one's nose to the 
grindstone. 

For example, friendships that are formed during college have a 
great potential to continue throughout a lifetime. Sharing the same 
experiences and helping each other through difficult times can start 
a bond that will continue after a diploma has been earned. There is 
more to life than dealing with a bad test grade. 

During the undergraduates' stay at the university, personality 
changes and shifts in the maturity levels are not uncommon. The 
students must realize that they are one step closer to becoming a part 
of the adult world. They are given both the freedom to live and behave 
as they choose and the added responsibility of preparing themselves 
for life after college. Interacting with men and women in a 
professional atmosphere requires self-composure and maturity in 
order to be taken seriously. Being responsible creates a better 
prospective employee. The seniors that are leaving the University of 
Illinois have learned many things while they were here and will take 
those lessons with them everywhere they go. This piece of the puzzle 
opened a gateway that could greatly inf lueiice the following pieces of 
the mosaic. 

The graduating seniors from the University of Illinois are 
embarking on a long trip to form their own unique mosaics. No two 
are alike. 



Groups of people 

gather for coffee and 

socialize, such as these 

European exchange 

students. The 

'aiyn Espresso 

icat place 

.;nd catch up 

^tirrent events. 



coffee 
talk 




where you got your brew of 
roasted caffeinated beans really did 
matter, according to local coffee con- 
noisseurs. However, the dilemma of 
choosing a coffee shop went much 
deeper than just the taste of the cof- 
fee. 

The campus and surrounding 
Champaign-Urbana area offered 
coffee shops to suit everyone's 
taste. There were some for hermits 
and socialites, for off-campus seek- 
ers and convenience drinkers, for 
the mature and youthful, for 
imported and conventional coffee 
lovers and for smokers and non- 
smokers. Obviously, the choice 
often fell outside of simply the cof- 
fee flavor and quality service. Each 
coffee shop provided a distinctive 
atmosphere that attracted different 
crowds. 

Espresso Royale on campus in 
Champaign offered "quick service 
and quality coffee," according to 



employee Sun Kim, senior in FAA. 
Kim also said the larger space, 
friendlier employees, downstairs sit- 
ting area and quad-viewing are 
added attractions. Shop frequenters 
include "students, professors, locals 
and everyone with a happy, coffee- 
drinking face," Kim said. 

The Daily Grind, tucked away in 
Johnstowne Centre, attracted an 
older crowd. 

"It's smaller, and it's orange and 
green with wood paneling. It's kind 
of out of the way," said employee 
Natasha Ritsma, senior in LAS. "And 
it's the only smoking cafe left in 
town." 

Ritsma said a lot of professors, 
graduate students and regulars from 
the '70s soaked up liberal doses of 
coffee and classical music there. 

As promised in its name, the 
International Cafe on campus provid- 
ed an exotic selection of drinkables. 

"We have a really wide selection 



of imported coffees that you can't 
get anywhere else on campus — like 
Vietnamese and Thai coffees," said 
employee Nathan Rosser, senior in 
FAA. 

The one-year-old coffee shop 
attracted a typical campus mix of 
graduates, faculty members, teachers 
and serious-minded undergraduate 
students. 

Nicole Williams, senior in LAS, 
spends hours in the St. Louis Bread 
Company drinking at cheap rates. 

"You pay $1 for a cup of coffee 
and they have free refills," Williams 
said. "If you get there by six, they 
close at nine so that's three hours of 
free refills." 

All in all, coffee shops can pro- 
vide much more than just food and 
drinks. They provide a place to 
study, a unique atmosphere for 
group meetings or simply a different 
place to relax and forget about life 
for a while. 



layout hy Carolyn Perschke 
story by Chuan-Lin Alice Tsai 



362 



Graduates 



Abarbanel-Babski 




Abarbanel, Rachael Belvidere 
Aboutar, Daniel Burbank 
Abu-Khdeir, Hanadi Berwyn 
Aceron, Suzanne Evanscon 
Achilles, Amber Westmont 
Achord, Shanna Normal 
Acosta, German Morton Grove 
Adair, Kristina Dwight 

Adams, Lisa Danville 
Adams, Michelle Metamora 
Aden, Mindy Newman 
Aden, Susan St. Joseph 
Adler, Lawrence Homewood 
Adsuar, Natalie Guaynabo, PR 
Aggertt, Michelle San Jose 
Agrest, Jeff Northbrook 

Aguilar, Annissa Aurora 
Ahmari, Susanne Naperville 
Ahn, Eura Urbana 
Aitken, Christine Harrington 
Albright, Angela Appleton, Wl 
Albright, Heather Danvers 
Allaman, Lori Roseville 
Allen, Jason Springfield 

Allen, Richard Palos Park 
Allen, Tennille Chicago 
Allord, Shane Lake Zurich 
Allswang, Jennifer Northbrook 
Almon, Ryan Silverdale, WA 
Altenbaumer, Jodi Decatur 
Althans, Tracey Long Grove 
Altom, Katherine Oak Ridge, TN 

Ander, Deborah Crystal Lake 
Anderson, Carrie South Barrington 
Anderson, Dwight Lake Bluff 
Andorfer, Heidi Rochester 
Andrejek, David Burbank 
Angus, Jason Ottawa 
Anhari, Ali Glenview 
Aningo, Welugewe Chicago 

Ankney, Jonathan Washburn 
Annis, Aaron Elgin 
Antal, Amber Washington 
Antonopoulos, George Elmhurst 
Aranda, Rogelio Chicago 
Aremu, Oyebisi Chicago 
Arends, Carrie Buffalo Grove 
Argao, Michael Oak Forest 

Argraves, James Madison, WI 
Armstrong, Katie Wheaton 
Arndt, Jennifer Roselle 
Arnett, Stephanie Pekin 
Arnold, Jeffrey Glenview 
Arredondo, Beatriz Bolingbrook 
Arth, Aaron Edwardsville 
Arthur, Scott Rockford 

Au, Connie Chicago 

Au, Wing Yun Champaign 

Aude, Christine Chadwick 

Augspurger, Susan East Peoria 

Aung-Myint, Terri Palatine 

Avni, Tamar Decatur 

Ayers, Sarah Coal Valley 

Babski, Dianne Hawthorn Woods 



GRADUATES 



363 



JLJ'^ 



ckiis-Biancalana 



I 



Backus, Neil Fisher 

Badrov, Joseph Champaign 

Badruddoja, Roksana Elgin 

Bailey, James Chicago 

Bailis, David Napervillc 

Baldoza, Veramarie Hinsdale 

Baieiko, Ruth Cadillac, MI 

Bambule, Suzzanne Romeoville 

Banerji, Ronald Liberryvillc 

Banks, Pamela Chicago 

Barengo, Beth Arlington Heights 

Barker, Christopher Urbana 

Barkley, Krista Minooka 

Barney, Julie Arlington Heights 

Barrera, Maria Champaign 

Barrington, Joshua Villa Park 

Barrow, Thalia Chicago 

Barstad, Kelda Anchorage, AK 

Bartelt, Allison joliet 

Bartelt, Chris Bartlett 

Bartholomew, Craig Carol Stream 

Bartimus, David Decatur 

Bartusch, Jeremy Kankakee 

Bashaw, Jennifer Downers Grove 

Basu, Anupam Naperville 

Bates, Derrick Orland Park 

Batista, Tatiana Fortaleza, Brazil 

Bauer, Ronald Addison 

Bauer, Steven Champaign 

Bauspies, JefF Lake Villa 

Bautista, Jeremy Westmont 

Beckberger, Amy Oakforest 

Becker, Daniel Chicago 

Beckett, Kelly Champaign 

Beckman, Craig Palatine 

Beckman, Daniel leutopolis 

Beegun, Denise Niles 

Beeker, Scott Danville 

Beh, Kian Teik Urbana 

Behr, Timothy Bloomington, MN 

Bell, Alicia TariffA-ille, CT 

Bell, Hans Matteson 

Belmonte, Teresa Benscnville 

Beltrame, Jennifer Champaign 

Benes, Brian Chicago 

Bennett, Karen Mascoutah 

Benson, Amanda Riverside 

Beran, Laura Belleville 

Berens, Steven Lcmont 

Berg, Kristi Morris Plains, NJ 

Berger, Maria Algonquin 

Berger, Reed Northbrook 

Berk, Dana LongCirove 

Bernard, Tehra Prospect Heights 

Bernotus, Nicole ( "rete 

Bernstein, Stephen Schaumburg 

Berry, Meredith Marengo 

Bcrtoglio, Kalhryn Bulfalo (irovc 

Bcshilas, Sofia Western Springs 

Belts, Julie Hamilton 

Bhaltacharyya, Rumi Darieii 

Biag, Jonathan (ileii LIlyn 

Biagini, Ixiri Peru 

Biancalana. IJisa Wiiifuld 




364 



Graduates 



Biewenga-Bruce 




JftJiii 



Biewenga, Michael Napcrville 
Bilder, Laura Chicago Ridge 
Bils, Brett St. Charles 
Birch, Jeffrey Robinson 
Birnbaum, Keith Lincoln 
Bischoff, Catherine Zionsville 
Bissell, Kevin Tinley Park 
Black, Darci Sherman 

Blacker, Travis Monticello 
Blair, Jonathan Wheaton 
Blakemore, Sharon Rockford 
Block, Nicholas Pearl City 
Blood, Susan Poplar Grove 
Bluestone, David Deerfield 
Blumenberg, Karia Chicago 
Boak, Derek Woodridge 

Bode, Christopher Eden Prairie, MN 
Bodine, William Bismark 
Boe, Tracy Ottawa 
Boehler, Nicole Godfrey 
Boian, Theresa Chenoa 
Bokamba, Nsengela Urbana 
Bokowy, Thomass Naperville 
Bond, Jaime Algonquin 

Bonovich, Earl Oak Lawn 
Bonsignore, Fenna Amherst, MA 
Booker, Paige Morris 
Booth, Brett Springfield 
Borak, Rachel Skokie 
Bordner, Heather Canton 
Borger, David Warren, NJ 
Boricic, Lisa Crete 

Bottom, Michael Rantoul 
Boudreau, Philip Gilman 
Boule, Melvin Sugar Grove 
Boulware, Christina Bloomington 
Bounds, Jennifer Frankfort 
Bowers, Elise Leawood, KS 
Bowers, Jessica Chicago 
Bown, Erica Kettering, OH 

Boyda, Maureen Naperville 
Bracki, Michael Lombard 
Brame, Sharon Bloomington 
Branham, Clyde Champaign 
Branham, Sheila Champaign 
Brannstrom, Megan Northbrook 
Branom, Matthew Belvidere 
Breidel, Kimberiy Peoria 

Brenner, Ann Palatine 
Bretthauer, Scott Yorkville 
Brewer, Careyana Springfield 
Brickley, Amy Louisville, KY 
Bridges, Glynnis Champaign 
Bridgewater, Jim Springfield 
Brill, Janine Des Plaines 
Britter, Torya Calumet City 

Brotschul, Martin Schaumburg 
Brown, Colleen Orland Park 
Brown, Joel Sherrard 
Brown, Marc Brookfield 
Brown, Pamela Elgin 
Brown, Rebecca DeKalb 
Brownell, Lisa Palatine 
Bruce, Ian Springfield 



Graduates 



365 



ich-Chambers 



I 



Bruch, Kevin Granville 

Brumm, Michael St. Louis, MO 

Brunette, Annie Crystal Lake 

Brusca, Eric Streamwood 

Buan, Joselle Crystal Lake 

Buck, James Champaign 

Buckman, Christina Lombard 

Budde, Matthew Highland 

Budzinski, Ted Harwood Heights 

Buedel, Michael Downers Grove 

Buesinger, Michelle Blue Mound 

Bugajski, Stacy Addison 

Bullerman, Alison LaGrangc 

Bullitt, Brian Matteson 

Burch, Bruce Glenview 

Burgeson, Marnie Geneva 

Burkhalter, Jeffrey Porter, IN 

Barman, Dawn Tolono 

Burnett, Peggie Chicago 

Burns, Kathy Orland Park 

Burns, Stacey Cerro Gordo 

Bussone, RJ Morton 

Butler, Alison La Harpe 

Buzzelli, Jodi Elk Grove Village 

Bye, Suzanne Normal 

Byers, Lynn Belvidere 

Byrne, Christopher Western Springs 

Byrne, Colin Minnitonka, MN 

Byrnes, Patrick Northfield 

Cada, Mary Elmhurst 

Cafaro, Brian Harrington 

Cafferty, Michael Pales Park 

Cahill, Brian Brimfield 

Campagna, Mary Chicago 

Campbell, Erin East Bismarck 

Campus, Brian joliet 

Canfield, Whitney Springfield 

Capes, Jennifer Champaign 

Caprio, Kellie Champaign 

Cargill, Dan Elgin 

Carl, Kimberly Wheeling 

Carlson, Brian Princeton 

Carlson, Brian Beecher Ciry 

Carolan, Shawn Glen Ellyn 

Carosielli, Kristen Mt. Prospect 

Carroll, David Champaign 

Carsello, Jeffrey Bloomingdale 

Carson, Adam Cincinnati, OH 

Carson, Jeremy C^incinnati, OH 

Carter, Keri Athens 

Carter, Natalie Tinley Park 

Carucci, Chris Maywood, NJ 

Caruthers, Jill Waverly 

Casaclang, Rowena Willowbrook 

Casner, Joy Batavia 

Casserly, Deirdrc Schaumburg 

C^astelloni, C;arol Oak forest 

Castens, Kyle Chester 

Cavanaugh, Amy Monticello 

Cavers, Josic Chicago 

Cervantes, Josefina (Chicago 

Cha, (^hung Sknkic 

Chaike, Stephen ( ^li.inipaigii 

(Chambers, Lana Smiililicld 




366 



Graduates 



For many students starting out col- 
lege life, sharing a room, was a new 
experience. Sure, some students had 
to share a room with a sibling, but 
that was a completely different expe- 
rience from living with a friend or a 
stranger. 

With a family member, we were 
allowed to yell when we were mad, 
be moody when we had a bad day 
or poke fun, to the extent of being 
downright rude, at a brother's or sis- 
ter's new girlfriend or boyfriend or a 
new hairdo because we were sup- 
posed to. Not that 
our families deserved 
all the grief we gave 
them, nor did we 
deserve the grief we 
received, but for the 
most part, we knew it 
would work out in 
the end. Some others 
of us may have only 
had experiences with roommates 
from a short sojourn at a summer 
camp or even from sleep overs with 
friends. Neither which prepared us 
in the least for living with a room- 
mate. 

With a roommate at school, there 
was not the same sense of openness 
at the beginning. It is hard to contin- 
ue the same jocularity with a 
stranger that we did with family 
members. How were we supposed 
to approach issues such as how 
much television to watch or how 
loud the music could be played? Was 
the room for sleeping or for enter- 
taining and hanging out with friends? 
What took precedence? 

In the beginning, it was hard to 
know what to expect, especially 
with no knowledge about our new 
roommates except for a sketchy let- 
ter or maybe a short luncheon date 



and a few phone calls. 

Even if we were rooming with 
friends it was difficult. We knew 
their likes and dislikes, maybe a few 
of their quirks, but did we really 
know what living with them in a 
new environment would be like? 
Our sources for forming an idea of 
living with a roommate were left to 
television, movies, books and per- 
sonal anecdotes. 

In general, students were expected 
to get along with their roommates or 
at least to respect one another. Some 



setting the Throng 
pectations for your 
ne^v roommate 



pairs hit a rough spot or two, while 
others stmggled long and hard to 
strike a balance that both roommates 
could agree to live with. Still others 
had none of these problems, but not 
because they got along perfectly. 

"I didn't necessarily expect us to 
be best friends, but I thought that 
we would get along together," said 
Wenlan Cheng, freshman in LAS. 
"Anyway, we really don't have time 
to fight; she's almost never home." 

Brett Hochmuth, freshman in LAS, 
had a similar experience, but he was 
more excited by his roommateless 
status. "I didn't really have any set 
expectations about my roommate 
before meeting him. I just thought 
we"d get along and become friends. 
Now I've decided the best kind of 
roommate is the one that doesn't 
live here. I've got a single, but I'm 
only paying for a double." 



While some students were relish- 
ing or fretting over the absence of 
their roommates, one student had a 
problem with unanticipated extra 
roommates - two chickens. 

"If I had even contemplated my 
roommate bringing a pet, I would 
have never thought of chickens," 
said Carrie Slaymaker, freshman in 
ALS. "At first, they were small and 
furry and cute, but I think it's time 
to make some chicken soup." 

Not all students brought optimistic 
views about their roommates to 

school with them. 
Alice Naretta, fresh- 
man in LAS, had a 
rather pessimistic 
view of what her 
roommate would 
be like. 

"I was really 
expecting her to 
be a lot bitchier 
than she is," said Naretta. "I just 
thought that since she was from the 
suburbs of Chicago and that she was 
on student council and really 
involved in her high school, she 
would be really uppity." 

So not every roommate lived up, 
or down, to the expectations set by 
their new living partner. Some stu- 
dents were disappointed by who 
they were paired with. 

"I think if people set their expec- 
tations too high, they aren't going to 
be satisfied with anyone they have 
to live with," said Cheng. 

Of course, not all students were 
displeased because their roommates 
did not fulfill the expectations set for 
them. 

Naretta commented, "My room- 
mate turned out to be a lot different 
than I had pictured. I guess I could 
say I was pleasantly surprised." 

layout by Ramiro Nava 
story by Sara Cahill 



Graduates 



367 



i^ 





m 



mm 



Hi . 




SLJ3 



,JI 



iiamcharas-Cull 



\ 



I 



Chatncharas, Jamarie Chicago 

Chan. Julie Arhngton Heights 

Chandrathil, Anita Des Plaines 

Chang, Wendy Orland Park 

Chaparro, MadeHne Chicago 

Chapman, Courtney Barrington 

Chapman, Karyn Darien 

Chapman, William Sterling 

Chapnick, Stephanie Buffalo Grove 

Chase, Jennifer Collinsville 

Chavez, Melissa Blue Island 

Chears, Florence East St. Louis 

Chen, Evan Urbana 

Chen, Michael Urbana 

Chen, Michelle Urbana 

Chen, Miles Urbana 

Chesniak, Kevin Chicago 

Chesta, Julie Chicago 

Chin, Doris Chicago 

Chin, Richard Lincolnwood 

Chin, Yvonne Naperville 

Chou, Peter Champaign 

Chou, Shih Shin Glendale 

Chow, Ellen Chicago 

Chu, Beverly Dayton, NJ 

Cimaroli, Edward Princeton 

Clark, Charles Geneva 

Clarke, Sunne Chicago 

Clausius, Kristin Fontana, Wl 

Cleary, Maureen Chicago 

Clendenin, Katherine Sparta 

Cloney, Jennifer Decatur 

Cochran, Christine Hamton, OH 

Cohee, Amy Mapleton 

Cohen, Ornit Deerfield 

Cohen, Valerie Northbrook 

Colby, Kimberly Palatine 

Collins, Jennifer Urbana 

Collins, Kathleen Palos Heights 

Collins, Michelle Homewood 

Colwell, Dorothea Champaign 

Conner, Latoya Oak Park 

Cook, Angela Mt. Auburn 

Cook, David Park Ridge 

Cook, Shelly Hanna City 

Cookis, Judith Wheaton 

Cooley, Heather Wheaton 

Corcoran, Debra Elgin 

Corsaw, Mindy (Champaign 

Cosman, Rebecca C^hampaign 

Corner, Rick St. Charles 

Coultas, Matthew Winchester 

Courier, Alice Alexander 

Courtney, Jerry Robinson 

Couturiaux, Darin Wavcrly 

Cox, Jennifer C^hampaign 

Oawford, Stacy Sullivan 

(rawlord, (Carrie Wilmcttc 

Ocech, John London, KY 

Cristobal, Malou Urbani 

Croft, Eric Nortn.il 

Crowe, Erin (Chicago 

Cuchra, f-raig Bcrwyn 

Cull, Ian l.lgin 




I 



370 



Graduates 



Cullinan-Dollinger 




Culllnan, Patrick Downers Grove 
Cummings, Joseph Oak Lawn 
Cunningham, Bridget Chicago 
Cunningham, Stacey Chicago 
Curran, Meghan Palatine 
Curran, Steven Darien 
Curtis, Amanda Johnston City 
Cuvala, Michelle Lombard 

D'Ercola, Jason Naperville 

DaSilva, Assir Chicago 

DaValle, Mark Arlington Heights 

Dabler, Vicky Ladd 

Daily, Beth Arthur 

Daino, Teresa Long Valley, NJ 

Dale, Sherri Walnut 

Damashek, Amy Barrington 

Dancey, Jen Sterling 
Daniels, Michael Chillicothe 
Dankoski, Eric Hillsboro 
Darling, Ginger Williamsville 
Das, Nirvan Urbana 
Dasse, Teresa Lake Forest 
Davis, Brent Springfield 
Davis, Christine Arlington Heights 

Davis, Rebecca La Grange 
Davis, Rebecca Houston, TX 
Dawson, Justin Urbana 
De Los Santos, Sandra Tinley Park 
Deanching, Reginald Matteson 
Deans, Rodessa C^hicago 
Debatin, Lyn Robinson 
Decker, Robin Northbrook 

Degler, Aaron Geneva 
Dekker, Amy 1 inley Park 
Del Real, Jose Calumet City 
DelaTorre, Dawn Calumet City 
Delgadillo, Elvia Chicago 
Delheimer, Kristi Cornell 
DeMichael, Linda Elk Grove 
Demick, Mark Joliet 

Dempsey, Kristen Champaign 
Deng, Xiaoxi Savoy 
Denning, Pamela Lemont 
Deopere, Denise Orland Park 
DeVar, William Harrisburg 
Dewitt, Christine Elk Grove Village 
Deyarmond, Constance Champaign 
Deysher, Jennifer Newtown Square 

Dickinson, Traci Dixon 
Dietrich, Shane Dundas 
Digate, Danielle Prospect Heights 
Dillman, Cynthia St. Joseph 
Divane, Patricia Chicago 
Diversiev, George Urbana 
Dixon, Helen Chicago 
Dixon, Kelly Geneva 

Dizon, Angelo Skokic 
Do, Khach Chicago 
Doell, Erin Champaign 
Doell, Susan Lombard 
Dolbin, Tom Champaign 
Doles, Kurt Lombard 
Dolezal, Sarah LaGrange 
Dolliger, Melissa Bourbonnais 



GRADUATES 



371 



to meet a 
deadline 



ii- 



layout by Steve Liao 
story by Ben Hoyle 




Graduate student Lynne 

Sprinez works on putting 

a study model together. 

Complicated models are 

often accompanied by 

pages of floor plans. 

Junior in FAA Steve Bopp 
calculates rise and run on a 
contour map. Architectural 
engineering requires accura- 
cy, detail and lots of time. 



Big projects were a stumbling 
block for many students. Almost 
every class had one or two big pro- 
jects that constituted a large chunk of 
the final grade. Some classes had 
three, four or even more projects. On 
top of all that, many students had 
more than one class at a time, so the 
probability of having multiple projects 
due on or near the same date was 
very high. Of course, the professors 
tried to keep their deadlines spaced 
out in regards to other classes, but 
that did not always work. Sometimes, 
students just had to face the facts and 
try to get everything done on time, 
even if it meant sacrificing sleep. 

Some people said that time man- 
agement was the key to avoiding the 
dreaded deadline crunches. Most 
classes had a syllabus that listed the 
due dates for all of the assignments, 
and all of the professors gave ample 
time for students to complete the 
a.ssignincnt.s. However, no matter 
how well the time re(iuirements were 





juggled, people still ended up need- 
ing to do a lot of work in an 
extremely short time. Murphy's law 
states that if something can go 
wrong, it will. 

Carl Nolting, junior in FAA, had 
three art labs on top of all of his 
other classes and activities. "I have 
classes all day and I can't start work- 
ing on my projects until nine o'clock 
at night," he said. That gave him the 
minimum amount of time to work on 
assignments and forced him to pull at 
least one all-nighter. 

The all-nighter was a popular way 
to handle a big workload. The basic 
idea behind the all-nighter was to not 
sleep until all of the work was done, 
which usually meant no sleeping at 
all. 

"I never planned to pull an all- 
nighter, but a lot of the times projects 
don't work out ciuite right and I have 
to work around the little things that 
come up," Nolting said. 

Some people had a great knack for 



pulling all-nighters. For example, 
Lindsey Graham, sophomore in FAA, 
expected to pull an all-nighter once a 
week because the high intensity lev- 
els of her classes. 

She did not mind pulling all- 
nighters, though. "All-nighters in 
architecture are different," Graham 
said. "In the studio there's always a 
ton of people. You've got your Mr. 
Pibb and you've got a party all 
night." 

All-nighters were not for everyone, 
though. Many people passed the year 
without pulling any all-nighters. This 
was not to say that they did not have 
to work hard. On the contraiy, they 
often gave up daylight hours to do 
homework and slept al night, instead 
of the other way around. 

'Ibni llemrick, junior in Agriculture, 
said, "I can't functk)n the next day if I 
pull an all-nighter, so 1 always start 
really early. " 

Early or late, night or day, the 
work was done. 



372 



Graduates 



DombroT^ski-Fick 








Dombrowski, Robert Barrington 
Dominiak, Erin lemont 
Dooley, Michelle Flossmoor 
Doucha, Heather South Beloit 
Douglas, Elizabeth Farina 
Dralle, Douglas Homewood 
Drews, Sharon Des Plaines 
Drinan, David Wheaton 

Droho, Jennifer Elm wood Park 
DuMoulin, Adam Batavia 
Dudycz, Oksana Niles 
Duesterhaus, Stacie Rochester 
Duffield, Gwendolyn Lensing 
Duffy, Margaret Champaign 
Duitsman, Kristin Rantoul 
Dulay, Claro Des Plaines 

Dumit, Marina Park Ridge 
Dunphy, Kathy Chicago 
Dupps, Kristina Champaign 
Dupuis, Marc Naperville 
Durkin, Amy Oak Lawn 
Durkin, Leslie Pales Heights 
Dykstra, Amy Aroma Park 
Dziedzic, Jason Addison 

Eadler, Justin Hampshire 
Eaton, Jeffery Maywood 
Eblen, Jennifer Champaign 
Eby, Kristin Lake Zurich 
Ecker, Thomas Glen Ellyn 
Eder, Linda Deerfield 
Edidin, Mindy Glenview 
Edmiston, Catherine Rowley, MA 

Edmonson, Jennifer Mt. Prospect 
Edwards, Julie Lombard 
Edwards, Sara Decatur 
Egawa, Edward Skokie 
El-Dinary, Ayman Urbana 
Elms, Lisa Highland 
Elwood, Matthew Beavercreek 
Engel, Ryan Arlington Heights 

Englehart, Erik Champaign 
Ensch, Kathryn Rochester, MI 
Ernsting, Melanie Elk Grove Village 
Erwin, Craig Champaign 
Essington, Chad Champaign 
Estacio, Kristine Itasca 
Estandarte, Anne Orland Park 
Fabbre, Jodine Joliet 

Fabian, Joshua Champaign 
Fair, Jill Godfrey 
Falat, Thomas Schaumburg 
Falkenthal, Denise Chillicothe 
Famatid, Rommel Glen Ellyn 
Farmer, Angela Crete 
Farrell, Rhett Lake City 
Farris, Mark Peoria 

Fedoryn, John Chicago 
Felbinger, Melissa St. Charles 
Feldman, Amanda Morton Grove 
Fen, Elena Skokie 
Fenster, Scott North Potomac, MD 
Ferro, Marc Chicago 
Fewkes, Lesley Albion 
Fick, Julia Decatur 



Graduates 



373 



igiira-Garceau 



Figura, James Lombard 

File, Shani Pocahontas 

Finlayson, Audrey Woodstock 

Fiorello, Michelle Rockhird 

Fischer, Christi Hottman Estates 

Fischer, Edwin Tilton 

Fitzgerald, Edward Flossmoor 

Fitzwater, Shane Braidwood 

Fleming, Karen Rogers, AR 

Flesner, Jennifer Carterville 

Flessner, Jolene Montrose 

Flewelling, Janet Downers Grove 

Flores, Martha Chicago 

Flowers, Allison Naperville 

Flowers, LaToya Matteson 

Flowers, Tara Chicago 

Fluegel, Rebecca Tremont 

Flynn, Adrianne Chicago 

Flynn, Jennifer Chicago 

FockJer, Leslie Wheaton 

Fogarty, Brian Pontiac 

Foley, Elizabeth Dolton 

Foley, Shane Lemont 

Folkenroth, Jason Peoria 

txjncannon, Michael University City, TX 

Fong, Agnes Champaign 

Forbes, Jeremy Springfield 

Forgy, Darren Pleasant Hill 

Fox, Ryan Braidwood 

Franchini, Jessica Winfield 

Francour, Erik Barrington 

Franey, Rebecca Piper City 

Franiuk, Renae Chicago 

Franke, Erica Champaign 

Franke, Mark Belleville 

Frantilla, Carol Broadview 

Freehill, Whitney Urbana 

Freese, Chad Rantoul 

Freese, Danielle Fowler 

Frese, Rebekah Quincy 

Fresso, Timothy Schaumburg 

Freund, Cassandra Wauconda 

Freund, Jessica Arlington Heights 

Fricker, Christine Bolingbrook 

Frieders, Daun Naperville 

Friedman, David Memphis, TN 

Frigo, Amy Western Springs 

Frigo, Kerri Dolton 

Frodyma, Melissa Downers Crove 

Froeschl, Stephanie (Champaign 

Fry, John Naperville 

Fudge, Kara Pittsfield 

Fuhr, Kevin Mattoon 

Fuller, Bryce Northbrook 

Fulton, Anita Galesburg 

Furmanski, Tracy Lin ley Park 

Ciabriel, Amy Ixlwardsville 

(ialco, Jodi Springfield 

(iale, lx)uis New Ixnox 

(iallick, Slephanic Minooka 

(iallol, Patrick Naperville 

Ganschow, Dean Sheffield 

Ciao, Yuan Aiirura 

Garceau, Alicia Winfield 




I 



374 



Graduates 



Garcia-Gray 




Garcia, Adolfo Chicago 
Garcia, Angelo Glendale Heights 
Garcia, Myrna Cicero 
Gardner, Lisa Buffalo Grove 
Garlich, Karen Nashville, TN 
Garner, Allen Mascoutah 
Garr, Tammy Rockford 
Garrett, Kenya Chicago 

Garrett, Christine Bloomington 
Garritano, Mary Calumet City 
Gaziano, Maria Rockford 
Ge, Shenzhang Urbana 
Gehrt, Trey Peoria 
Geister, Ryan Dundee 
Geraci, Karen Wheaton 
Gerleman, Laura Northbrook 

Gerstein, Kimberly Champaign 
Ghosh, Abhijit Kendall Park, NJ 
Giannini, Louis Berwyn 
Gibbs, Tamara Carbondale 
Gibson, Andrea Clarendon Hills 
Gier, Jonathan Western Springs 
Gieseke, Brian Danville 
GifFord, Adrienne Washington DC 

Giles, Margaret Champaign 
Gili, Aneela Skokie 
Gill, John Wyoming 
Gilman, Adam Vernon Hills 
Ginsberg, Scott Elk Grove 
Giorgetti, Duane Lockport 
Gipson, Tawanda Maywood 
Giuriceo, Christina Lake Forest 

Given, Lorl Mt. Vernon 
Glade, Todd East Moline 
Glass, Diane Champaign 
Gleason, Katherine Park Ridge 
Gleich, Jennifer Wheaton 
Go, Jenny Chicago 
Goben, Mattew Casey 
Goldberg, Andrew Highland Park 

Goldman, Shoshana Palatine 
Goldstein, Daniel Evanston 
Goldstein, Stacey Northbrook 
Golub, Lance Buffalo Grove 
Gonzalez, Felix Chicago 
Goodman, Julie Bolingbrook 
Goodman, Madonna Barrington Hills 
Goodman, Will Mahomet 

Gordon, Marcy Aurora 
Gorfin, Eugene Mt. Prospect 
Gorman, Katherine South Holland 
Gorny, Kristen Des Plaines 
Gorski, Dawn Lombard 
Gortowski, Andrew Frankfort 
Gothier, Sean Palatine 
Govindaiah, Rajesh Moline 

Goznobi, Tahazida Los Angeles, CA 
Grabowski, Lawra Centralia 
Gradman, Steven Chicago 
Graham, Douglas St. Charles 
Graham, Jolene Wellington 
Grant, Melissa Donovan 
Grant, Noreen Glenview 
Gray, Juliann C<.ne\,i 



Graduates 



375 



■•''X'- 




I'.iiil 1,1. ini, 










-I'.iLil (.i..m> 


1 




r 'iff 


/ 1 


^HKA'T 




1 ^^^^^^^^^^^B^MMMtMih ^ ['""y^r ''^^P^^l 


■ 


-■ 


jy^^nl^ 


r 




nwr 


• 



Harshbarger 



Gray, Lisa O'Fallen 

Green, Amy Quincy 

Green, Kristi Trilla 

Greenberg, Pam Champaign 

Greenfield, Allison Lincolnshire 

Gregre, Joel Park Ridge 

Gresko, John St. Charles 

Grieve, Andrew Bolingbrook 

Grijnsztein, Daniel Great Neck, NY 

Griswald, Matthew Mahomet 

Gritters, Joel El Paso, TX 

Groner, Allen Arlington Heights 

Gross, Christy Peru 

Grotto, Matthew Wheaton 

Growney, Alicia South Harrington 

Growney, Kimberly Franklin Park 

Guebert, Danielle Red Bud 

Gugala, Stephen Bolingbrook 

Gupta, Jay St. Louis, MO 

Gupta, Kaushal Glendale Heights 

Guritz, Cheryl Urbana 

Gutilla, Shauna Chicago 

Haag, Brad Hilliard, OH 

Haaland, Wendy Yorkville 

Haas, Christopher Englewood, CO 

Hachmeister, Gregory Des Plaines 

Hackett, Katherine Morris 

Hackman, Brian Rockford 

Hadjikyriacou, Eleni Urbana 

Haenitsch, April Dixon 

Haertel, Scott Mt. Prospect 

Haery, Susan Highland Park 

Hage, Sara Dixon 

Hagen, Kara Champaign 

Hahn, Brice Washington 

Hahn, Rebecca Washington 

Haiges, Robin Algonquin 

Mainline, Diane Havana 

Halac, Kelley Clarendon Hills 

Hall, Kelyssa Champaign 

Hall, Michael Naperville 

Han, Jung Ho Champaign 

Han, Wonsun C^hampaign 

Hancock, James Dwight 

Handley, Douglas South Holland 

Hanigan, Brian Arlington Heights 

Hankins, Khalid Park Forest 

Hanrahan, Jessica (Champaign 

Hansen, Christina Arlington Heights 

Hansens, Roger (Champaign 

Hanson, Debbie Clifton 

Hanson, Eric Wheaton 

Hardee, Jennifer Aurora 

Hardesty, Brent Danvcrs 

Hardy, Amy Belleville 

Harmon, Laura l.clwards 

I laronik, Ann Molinc 

Harris, Adrienne ( 'h.uiipaigii 

Harris, Michelle W.llow Hill 

Harris, Nile ( ).ik O.irk 

Harris, Robin Riverside 

Harris, Robin I )oI|()M 

Harrison, Melanie ( Ji.mip.iign 

Harshbarger, Jennifer D.mvilK 




378 



Graduates 



Hart-Hoffer 




Hart, Brian St. Louis, MO 
Hartman, Darren Peoria 
Hartmann, Thomas Tinley Park 
Hartzer, Jeffrey Northbrook 
Harvey, Caroline Flossmoor 
Harvey, Michelle Vernon Hills 
Haskell, Kim Buffalo Grove 
Hasselhring, Timothy Bermuda 

Hatfield, Mark ('hicago Heights 
Hattori, Takako Champaign 
Hawson, John McHenry 
Hayden, Jeoffry Peru 
Haye, Tracy Elk Grove 
Hayek, Benjamin Warrenville 
Hayes, Jennifer C'hampaign 
Hayes, Robert Urbana 

Heap, Julia Clinton 
Hearn, Laura Glen Lllyn 
Heaton, Alice Geneva 
Hebenstreit, Mike Decatur 
Heedum, Julie Woodridge 
Hegele, Eric Springfield 
Heil, Brian Belleville 
Heindselman, Emily Olney 

Heisner, Craig Genoa 
Heitzig, Timothy Alton 
Hellin, Steven Holbrook 
Helium, Heather Hazel Crest 
Helms, Matthew Belleville 
Hemann, Michael Worden 
Hembrough, Shawn Winchester 
Hemme, Elizabeth Norridge 

Hemphill, LaShurn Chicago 
Henard, Tessa Charleston 
Henning, Catriese Chicago 
Henning, Heather Hinsdale 
Henrichs, Melinda Forrest 
Henry, Brad Tuscola 
Herlien, Charmagne Downers Grove 
Herman, Neelie Lake Forest 

Hermano, Michael Lisle 
Hernandez, Adriana Urbana 
Hernandez, Gabriel Summit 
Hernandez, Gloria Chicago 
Herrera, Gilbert Franklin Park 
Herron, Daniel Chicago 
Hertz, Elizabeth Mahomet 
Hess, Jennifer Llrbana 

Hetzer, Kimberly Wheeler 
Heuberger, Brad Wheeling 
Heynis, Julie Ingleside 
Hickey, Elizabeth East Peoria 
Hickey, Julie Lockport 
Hickey, Mary Wyoming 
Hickman, John Sherrard 
Higgins, Edward Lake Forest 

Hill, Amy La Grange 
Hillier, Janet Chillicothe 
Hilton, Amanda Bloomington 
Hinchey, Elizabeth Wheaton 
Hirt, Stacey Mt. Prospect 
Hoeksema, Jason Bartlett 
Hoferle, Jill Algonquin 
Hoffer, Gretchen Elgin 



Graduates 



379 



Hoffman-Johns 



i 

I 



I 






Hoffman, Christina Terie Haute, IN 

Hoffman, Maya Urbaiia 

Hoffman, Richard Orland Park 

Hogan, Molly Champaign 

Hogel, Heather Urbana 

Holland, Keisha Bellwood 

Hollett, Heather Springheld 

Holm, Kjersten Champaign 

Hoist, Tracy Danville 

Homan, Julie Ingleside 

Hommema, Scott Rockford 

Hong, Yong Jae Champaign 

Hood, Nathan Springfield 

Hook, Amy Cape Girardeau, MO 

Hopkins, Lisa Lynwood 

Horn, Fred Urbana 

Houk, Jennifer Oak Lawn 

Howe, Mary Lombart 

Howell, Troy Champaign 

Howlett, Rebecca Rockford 

Hrodey, Andrew Sheldon 

Hsu, Jason Urbana 

Hubbard, Almasi Urbana 

Hubbert, Sheri Winchester 

Hubberts, Eileen Arlington Heights 

Huelsmann, Janiece Urbana 

Huffman, Joel Belvidere 

Huffman, Shannon Peoria 

Hughes, Ann Neshanic, Nj 

Hughes, David Wheaton 

Hulina, Holly Harrington 

Hull, Chris Arlington Heights 

Hulting, Andrew Sheffield 

Hulting, Melissa Champaign 

Hummel, Scott Millsradt 

Hunter, David Fairview Heights 

Hurelbrink, Michael Champaign 

Hynes, Colleen Park Ridge 

Hynes, Karen Orland Park 

Ignazito, Susan Charelston 

Imsorn, Kornvara Homewood 

Ingle, Emily Palatine 

Ingrassia, Dana Rockford 

Isenburg, Amy Granite City 

Isenhart, Kristen Champaign 

Jackson, Darren laylorville 

Jackson, Gregg Tinley Park 

Jackson, Scott Brookeville, MD 

Jacobsen, Paul P!lmhurst 

Jaeschke, Lisa Dcs Plaines 

Jaffer, Akbar (Champaign 

Jahneke, Margo Rantoul 

James, Jacqueline Decatur 

Janssen, Fiachel Homewood 

Jenkins, Ix;igh Monmouth 

Jennings, Victoria ('hicago 

Jensen, Alison Ocle 

Jensen, Laura Dixon 

Jereb, Steven Uiita 

Jewell, Malt German Valley 

Jezior, Kathryn Hoffman Estates 

Jin, Kyo- Young Hewlcii, NY 

Jodlowski, Sandra Naperville 

Johns, Jennifer ( champaign 




i 



380 



Graduates 



finding 

a job 

can be 

a pretty 
scary 
thing 

layout by Jill Kogan 
story by Adam S labor 



Are you worried about life after 
your years at U of 1? Finding a job 
after graduation might be difficult, 
but U of I tries to make finding a 
job as easy as possible. 

It was a full time job just to start 
looking for a career. Seniors had 
many different processes to prepare 
for and many different places to go. 
There are career services, placement 
offices and placement and career 
advising offices to go to when 
inquiring about job availability. 
Students went to these various loca- 
tions to find out information to fur- 
ther their job search. 

T went to my departmental 
office. They were very nice and 
helpful," Chih Liang, senior in 
Engineering, stated. "The reason I 
went to the Engineering office was 
because it was a place where I could 
schedule interviews and they had all 
of the company literature that I 
needed." 

In addition, a student could go to 
the Career Cluster in the 
Undergraduate Library, which was 
funded by the Mother's Association 
and Dad's Association. The Career 
Cluster has information on career 
planning, choosing a major, resume 
writing, interviewing techniques, 
internships and employment direc- 
tories. 

There were also opportunities 
available at career fairs which were 
located at on campus and off campus 
sites. Just a few of the fairs were 
Teacher Placement Day, Illinois 
Collegiate Job Fair and The 
Multicultural Career Conference. 



Prospective employers talked to stu- 
dents about their career interests. 
They were also helpful in setting up 
interviews for prospective students. 

Thomas Lee, senior in 
Engineering, stated, "The career fair 
was very hectic and overwhelming 
at times. If you know what you 
want, it'll be very helpful. Also, if 
you just want to see what is out 
there, it is a good experience." 

There were also workshops 
throughout the year which had 
career planning and placement pro- 
fessionals and company representa- 
tives. Topics included writing 
resumes and cover letters, prepara- 
tion for first and second interviews, 
conducting job searches and making 
successful transitions from college 
to a career. 

Students could also take advan- 
tage of individual counseling avail- 
able at their college departmental 
offices. The computerized DISCOV- 
ER and SIGI-PLUS programs offered 
help in evaluating career interests 
and plans. Interest and aptitude 
tests were also available. 

Jacqueline Gordon, senior in LAS, 
stated, "The computer programs 
helped me to discover my job inter- 
ests. Also, the postings at the 
Career Services Center have helped a 
great deal." 

Having this many ways to find 
jobs helped make the student's job 
much easier. These programs gave U 
of I students many opportunities to 
find careers that students at many 
other colleges and universities did 
not possess. 



Graduates 



381 



olins-Kelly 



Johns, John Glcnview 

Johnson. Glynnis Ballwin, MO 

Jolinson, Jennifer Bethalto 

Johnson, Jennifer Ann Downers Grove 

Johnson, Julie Moline 

Johnson, Kimberly Elgin 

Johnson, Marion Chicago 

Johnson, Sarah Gibson Ciry 

Johnson, Tamara Country Club Hills 

Johnston, Jennifer Tinley Park 

Johnston, Mark Dundee 

Johnston, Meredith Glen Ellyn 

Johnstone, Eric San Diego, CA 

Jones, Gary Albion 

Jones, Elizabeth Bolingbrook 

Jones, Erika Gurnee 

Jones, Gayle Harvard 

Jones, Johnathon Vandalia 

Jones, Temetra Champaign 

Joo, Se Urbana 

Jordan, Matthew Pontiac 

Joseph, Saramma Skokie 

Joshi, Sanjay Champaign 

Jovic, Rado Arlington Heights 

Juan, Jeffrey Bartlett 

Jung, Cathleen Godfrey 

Junkas, Jeff Chicago 

Justice, Jenna Aurora 

Kacmarcik, Tara Libertyville 

Kahan, Corrie Highland Park 

Kaiser, Jeff St. Louis. MO 

Kalaher, Chad Litchfield 

Kalina, Brian Commack, NY 

Kalinowsld, Aaron Grand Rapids, Ml 

Kalish, Christopher Naperville 

Kallmann, Kathleen Naperville 

Kamis, Robert Crete 

Kanabay, Robert Hinsdale 

Kanani, Shilpa Libcrr\'ville 

Kane, Amy Godfrey 

Kane, Clinton Genesee 

Kania, Edyta Chicago 

Kapoor, John Libertyville 

Kapp, John Quincy 

Kardatzke, Daniel Darien 

Karmel, Anil Gurnee 

Karp, Michele Glendalc Heights 

Karth, Matt (]lenview 

Karvelis, Julie Naperville 

Kashi, Asaf Ironia, Nj 

Kasper, Edward Burr Ridge 

Katz, Amy Woodridge 

Katznelson, Scott C'hampaign 

Kaufman, Ryan Glcnview 

Kaur, Adam Rivcrdale 

Kay, Lisa Skokie 

Keil, Nicholas Westville 

Keller, Amy Normal 

Keller, Jeffrey ( Chicago 

Kclley, Dennis St. Louis, MO 

Kellogg, Tim Yorkville 

Kelly, Bclh Clarendon Hills 

Kelly, (;hris Anti<n.li 

Kelly, Kelly Huisoiivillc 




382 



Graduates 



Kelly-Kozeliski 




Kelly, Mary North Riveriide 
Kelly, Michael Champaign 
Kelmachter, Heather Cheshire, CT 
Kendregan, Sherry Urbana 
Kenner, Emily Hawthorn Woods 
Kenny, Thomas Chicago 
Kenon, Dee Angela Peoria 
Kerrigan, John (Chicago 

Kessler, Kimberly Champaign 
Kessler, Sharon iiigraham 
Kesterke, Michelle Sycamore 
Kettell, Allison Belleville 
Khoury, Linda Palos Park 
Kietzman, Brenda Cissna Park 
Kilburg, Aaron Geneva 
Kim, Geanie Des Plaines 

Kim, Joyce Elmhurst 
Kim, Peter Chicago 
King, Rob Trussville 
Kingsbury, Julia Northlake 
Kinney, Karen Western Springs 
Kinsley, Joshua Champaign 
Kipka, Michelle Urbana 
Kirkwood, Allen New Baden 

Klamrzynski, Heather Buffalo Grove 
Klappauf, Laurel Bloom ingdale 
Klarman, Lori Glenview 
Klaus, Paul Freeport 
Klein, Abigail Chicago 
Klein, John Crestwood 
Kleinkemper, Michael St. Louis, MO 
Klepper, Jill Freeport 

Klepper, Shari Champaign 
Klimes, Sarah Moline 
Kline, Cameron Shorewood 
Klisiewicz, Tom Westchester 
Klobnak, Robert Metamora 
Klopfenstein, Peter Morton 
Klymkowych, Romana Wheaton 
Knabjian, Denise Chicago 

Knapp, Christopher Quincy 
Kneer, Jeffrey Champaign 
Knod, Adam Springfield 
Ko, Sun Kyung Chicago 
Kobiica, Lisa Lemont 
Koca, Julie Schaumburg 
Koch, Gregory Cincinnati, OH 
Koch, Sheryl South Holland 

Koepel, Ann Chicago Ridge 
Kofahl, Drew Chatham 
Koffler, Robert Bryn Mawr, PA 
Kogan, Jill Chicago 
Kohlbacher, Kelly Rockford 
Kohnke, JoAnna Chicago 
Kolb, Deborah Glendale Heights 
Kong, Avery Homewood 

Korose, Christopher Glen F.llyn 
Korzen, Carol Hillside 
Koss, Serra Derby 
Kot, Robert Arlington Heights 
Kovarik, Amy Orland Park 
Kozak, Jenette Flemington, NJ 
Kozanecki, Kaya Springfield 
Kozeliski, Kristen Decatur 



Graduates 



383 



::« 



:>>■' 



I 




^. h>!."'K.i'' 



iow^ski-Lee 



I 



Kozlowski, Christopher Urbana 

Kraemer, Lauren Chicago 

Krajecki, Susan Elgin 

Kranz, Jill ArUngton Heights 

Krause, Rebecca Napervilie 

Kreibich, Jay Elmhurst 

Kremer, Sharon Chicago 

Kremer, Thomas Chicago 

Kremper, Jacquelyn Burr Ridge 

Kretschimer, Alison Palatine 

Kretschmer, Eric Lake Zurich 

Kretz, David Hoffman Estates 

Kriegler, Kurt Addison 

Kristof, Thomas Round Lake Beach 

Kroiicki, John Cicero 

Krolikowski, Kari Lansing 

Krueger, Jeffrey Chicago 

Krueger, Kristopher Leawood, KS 

Krumdick, Kara Arlington Heights 

Kucek, Klaudia Burbank 

Kucharczyk, Suzanne Palos Hills 

Kuchenthal, William Galesburg 

Kulpins, Mark Des Plaines 

Kunath, Traci Hawthorn Woods 

Kuncl, James Hinsdale 

Kunkle, David Woodbridge, VA 

Kurth, Jennifer Schaumberg 

Kuster, Sara Peoria 

Kwan, Sui Yan Chicago 

LaCasha, Patricia Orland Park 

LaCrosse, Tracy Oak Brook 

Lacy, Joel Monticello 

Lai, Jane Urbana 

Lake, Christopher Glen Ellyn 

Lam, Darlene Glen Ellyn 

Lamb, John Vienna 

Lamkey, Jason Champaign 

LaMonica, Donald Franklin Park 

LaMotte, Renee Glenview 

Landauer, Michael Champaign 

Lang, Taryn Mt. Prospect 

Langer, Patricia Rolling Meadows 

Larsen, Julie Ann Chicago 

Larson, Danelle Alpha 

Larson, Sheri St. Augustine 

Laskey, Joseph Napervilie 

Latimer, Chris Buffalo Grove 

Lavery, Darin Geneseo 

Lawlor, Bill Orland Park 

Lawrence, Christopher Park Ridge 

Lawrence, Terry Belleville 

Lease, Christine Jacksonville 

LeClaire, Aimee Godfrey 

Leddell, Courtney Springfield 

Lee, Ann Champaign 

l^e, Ching Wen laipai, laiwan 

Ix-c, Craig Wellington 

Lee, Henry ('hampaign 

Lee, Jane (Champaign 

Lee, Melissa Matlcson 

I^c, Nakia Glenwood 

Ixe, Paul (ilen Ellyn 

Ix-c, Robert Norman, OK 

Ixe, Thomas Norilibrook 




386 



Graduates 



Any university student can go to 
room 172 IMPE and register with a 
team to compete in intramural 
sports. There are no physical fitness 
rec|uirements or tryouts in\'olved. It 
is just good, clean fun. 

Julie Grena, junior in Aviation and 
Ixlucation, has played softball since 
the seventh grade and volleyball for 
more than seven years. When she 
came to the U of I, she thought 
about trying out for the volleyball 
team. Taking her schoolwork into 
consideration, Grena weighed the 
pros and cons of joining the highly 
competitive team. She finally decid- 
ed that it was in her best interest not 
to join the team, but she did not 
want to completely exclude sports 
from her life. 

"Intramural sports are a way to 
still stay involved," Grena said. 

The main reason for her decision 
was that they take up less time. No 
grueling practices or excessive num- 
ber of games and tournaments are 
required. Plus, she can decide with 
her team when the best times are for 
them to play. 

Grena commented, "It is a differ- 
ent way to get away from the stress 
of school." 

Nancy Janowiak, junior in ALS, 
coordinates a variety of teams in her 
sorority. In the fall, she tacks a sign- 
up sheet to the wall to see who is 
interested in doing what sports and 
when they have free time for the 
games. Then she goes to IMPE to 
get the information about available 
playing times along with a list of 
rules. Each team must pay a $25 fee 
when they sign up. The games con- 
tinue for a three week period ending 
with one week of playoffs. 

As a captain, Janowiak must 



attend a total of two meetings, 
which she considers to be a small 
time commitment. 

Her words of advice to all cap- 
tains planning a team are, "Make 
sure you have enough players to do 
it so that you don't get fined for for- 
feiting." 

Aaron Reilly, junior in Engineering, 
said, "In a fraternity setting it's fairly 
easy to get people to do anything." 

He is the intramurals captain for 
the Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity and 
claims that he has little problem get- 
ting people to play on the different 
teams. 

Although the majority of the teams 
participating in intramurals are just 
out to have fun and get some exer- 
cise on the side, some of them are 
out for blood, according to Reilly. 
He has participated in broomball 
and baseball which gave him the 
opportunity to compete against a 
few teams that consisted of hand 
picked players who wanted to win 
at any cost 

Winning is always nice, but nearly 
everyone loses sometimes. Reilly's 
teams are willing to accept that. 
They will not bust their butts over a 
game because they are just out to 
have fun. 

Reilly believes that the whole 
point of intramural sports has an 
emphasis on social gatherings. For 
some people it may be the only time 
they have to hang out with certain 
friends. They can relax and be them- 
selves. 

If one person screws up during a 
game and costs the team the win- 
ning point, no one will attack the 
person, according to Reilly. Instead, 
everyone pats each other on the 
shoulder and calls it a good game. 



intramural 
sports: 
you don't 
have to be 
the best of 
the best 

layout by 
Carolyn 
Perschke 
story by Amie 
Megginson 



Graduates 



387 



Lehman-Madoch 



I 




.'*■;■■■. 



Lehman, Maryn Oak Lawn 

Leipold, Sheryl Palos Heights 

Lemmon, Shandi Robinson 

Lennington, Eric Morton 

Leon, Jennifer Urbana 

Leong, Clement Urbana 

Leslie, Erin Rockford 

Letsos, John Gienview 

Letwat, Jay Champaign 

Leung, Jason Rolling Meadows 

Levin, Darryl Woodcliff Lake, NJ 

Lewensky, Linda Urbana 

Lewis, Renee Gurnee 

Ley, Robert Rochester 

Lezak, Melissa Northbrook 

Li, Tao Champaign 

Liebovich, Cynthia Champaign 

Liem, Wan Ching Champaign 

Liermann, Kelle Rockford 

Lillig, Karrie-Lynn Elk Grove Village 

Lim, Margaret Hoffman Estates 

Limon, Julie Oak Lawn 

Lin, Edward Downers Grove 

Lin, Kwong Shing N.T. Hong Kong 

Lindahl, Jeremy Aurora 

Lindberg, Sara Naperville 

Lindeman, Angela Savoy 

Lindquist, Jason Northbrook 

Lipkie, Steven Worth 

Lipsey, Zsa'Marcia Chicago 

Lipsky, Matthew Petersburg 

Liter, Carissa Jacksonville 

Little, Joy St. Charles 

Liu, Hsiu Pen Savoy 

Liu, Jasper Worthington, OH 

Liu, Tai-fen Wendy Lansing 

Livingston, John Springfield 

Lloyd, Matthew Normal 

Lloyd, Sherie Robbins 

Lo, Hsin-Hsin Champaign 

Lo, Ronald Champaign 

Lolans, Karen Crystal Lake 

Long, Thomas Naperville 

Lonze, Julie Champaign 

Lorenc, Jana Berwin 

Loyola, Irwin Chicago 

Lucas, Sarah Springfield 

Lufkin, Melissa Naperville 

Luong, Vi Chicago 

Luzbetak, Paul Lockport 

Lyall, Mason Morton Grove 

Lyda, Judy (Calumet ('ity 

Lyman, Ellen McHcnry 

Lynch, Kelli West Salem 

Lynch, Stacey Riverton 

Lynne, David Naperville 

Ma, Victor Vancouver, ('anad.i 

Mal)ilangan, ItixJiellc ( llendalc I kigiiis 

Mabrey, Iraci I reeporl 

Macaluso, Michael Chicago 

Macapugay, Jaygce Park Ridge 

Machalka. Mark loikporl 

Madison, Darcy W.iliiiii 

Madoch, Kerry WluaKJii 




i 



388 



Graduates 



Mafee-McGrath 




Mafee, Rana Oak Brook 

Magee, Rebecca Petersburg 

Mager, Christopher Fairview Heights 

Maier, Jonathan Belleville 

Majerczak, Viaoria Arlington Heights 

Mak, Jennifer Champaign 

Malacina, Gary Piano 

Mahk, Faiza Abu-Dhabi U.A.E. 

Malone, Donna Chicago 
Malone, Kay Champaign 
Maloney, Amy Burr Ridge 
Mancine, Dominick Peoria 
Manderino, Michael Burbank 
Mandl, Jennifer Norhtbrook 
Mangano, Lisa Darien 
Mangurten, Brad Glenview 

Mann, Jennifer River Forest 
Mann, Jessica Niles 
Mansukhani, Anil Mt. Prospect 
Mao, Jun Darien 
March, Sarah Quincy 
Marcotte, Dana Lansing 
Marcus, Michelle Champaign 
Marev, Penny Chicago 

Marino, Tricia Schaumburg 
Marsh, Darren LaGrange 
Marsh, Jennifer Aurora 
Marshfield, Lisa Lincolnwood 
Martin, Jason Moline 
Martin, Lora Orland Park 
Martin-Ruiz, Beatriz Los Angeles, CA 
Marten, Heather Chicago 

Marx, Christopher Mount Carmel 
Mason, Thomas Quincy 
Mason, William Dayton, OH 
Massey, Michelle Waukegan 
Massucci, Matthew Barrington 
Mather, Marianne Bloomington 
Mathew, Thomas Quincy 
Mathon, Ammie Owaneco 

Matthews, Jessica Glenview 
Matts, Carrie Rockford 
Maurer, Erik Homewood 
Mavros, Dana Elgin 
Maxey, Cecil Chicago 
May, Kimberly Chicago 
Mayer, Joanne Barrington 
Mazur, Daniel River Grove 

McAloon, Elizabeth Chicago 
McAnelly, Nealy Urbana 
McCaleb, Kristen Palos Heights 
McCarthy, Erin Joliet 
McClusky, Amy Mattoon 
McCoUom, Patrick Western Springs 
McConachie, Angela (.Aider 
McDannel, Janeen Urbana 

McDonald, Suzanne laylorville 
McDonough, Megan Chicago 
McDowell, Alison Downers Grove 
McFarland, Jonathan Edwardsville 
McGee, Misty Flora 
McGinnis, Amy Quincy 
McGrath, Alastar Chicago 
McGrath, Marjorie Peoria 



Graduates 



389 



McGraw-Monks 



I 



McGraw, Joseph Plainfield 

McGuire, Ellen St. Louis, MO 

McKendrick, Colleen Western Springs 

McKim, Shawn Edwards 

McLaughlin, Diane Mt. Zion 

McLeod, Sarah Northbrook 

McLevige, Leonard Urbana 

McLoughlin, James Grays Lake 

McMahon, Pete Chicago 

McManus, Stephen Palatine 

McNaught, Meredith Geneseo 

McNutt, Enid Lebanon 

Mead, Megan Deerfield 

Mead, Michael Wheaton 

Medernach, Jennifer Rockterd 

Meehah, Miini Inverness 

Meeker, Lori Mason City 

Meidroth, Michael Peoria 

Melbye, Brandon Elk Grove 

Melchi, Meghan Elgin 

Melhart, Karen Brookfield 

Mell, William Delavan 

Mendoza, Georgina Urbana 

Meredith, Laura Amherst, NY 

Merod, Robert Millstadt 

Mertens, Amy Sue St. Charles 

Messinger, Mark Springfield 

Meydrech, Leigh Lisle 

Meyer, Brian Manteno 

Meyers, Jaqueline McHenry 

Meznarsic, Michelle Peoria 

Michael, Patrick Urbana 

Michau, Lori Crestwood 

Michonski, Christine Northbrook 

Mies, Timothy St. Joseph 

Migawa, Mandy Chicago 

Miglin, Elizabeth Monticello 

Milkereit, Eric St. Anne 

Miller, Alexander Austin, TX 

Miller, Amy Naperville 

Miller, Carrie Villa Park 

Miller, Cheryl Urbana 

Miller, Jeffrey Naperville 

Miller, Kevin Champaign 

Miller, Melissa Rockford 

Miller, Michael Morton 

Milligan, Rebecca Ottawa 

Mills, Scott Bcvcrton, OR 

Milner, Julia Danville 

Milos, James Palos Hills 

Milton, Sarah C^hampaign 

Minarik, Julie Arlington Heights 

Minch, Chris Rantoul 

Minor, Leslie Kankakee 

Minor, Paula Rocklord 

Mirocha, Nathan Moktna 

Misener, Brian Aurora 

Miserendino, Peter Darien 

Mitchell, Angela Winnebago 

Mizanin, Marcus Lansing 

Mlacnik. Daniel Pleasant Plains 



Mlade, Lauren l.aCira 
Mohr, Mark I airmo 
Monks, Jeffrey ( 



ige 




390 



Graduates 




Monroy-Nguyen 



Monroy, Victor Hoffman Estates 
Moore, Angela Walshville 
Moore, Dorothy Champaign 
Moore, Jonathan Aurora 
Moore, Mark Galesburg 
Moore, Rebecca Warrensburg 
Moore, Shelley Manhattan 
Moore, Teresa O Fallen 

Morales, Judith Oak Park 
Moran, Brian Northbrook 
Morrone, Anthony Oak Lawn 
Morrow, Mary Danville 
Mosbarger, Mark Rochelle 
Moscato, Sabrina Buffalo Grove 
Moser, David Clarendon Hills 
Mosher, Shellie Lyndon 

Moss, Heather Park Ridge 
Motohashi, Rieko Tokyo, Japan 
Moulden, Megan Evanston 
Moy, Janice Downers Grove 
Moy, Sharon Chicago 
Mraz, Jill Joliet 
Mueller, Suzanne Columbia 
Mulcahy, Christopher Chicago 

Mulder, Sonia Glen Ellyn 
Mullin, Michelle Schaumburg 
Mundorff, Sherry Goodthorp 
Mundzic, Jasmine Buffalo Grove 
Munson, Tyler Tiskilwa 
Murphy, Guinevere Chicago 
Murray, Julie Mt. Prospect 
Mushrush, Tammy Sumner 

Musick, William Wapella 
Musur, Jeffrey Sleepy Hollow 
Naatz, Beth Schaumburg 
Nadler, Julie Northbrook 
Naggs, Kathleen Bartlett 
Nagle, Brian Springfield 
Nahnson, Erik Orland Park 
Nahumyk, Andrew Wheaton 

Nailor, Sheristen Waukegan 
Nail, Jon Dekalb 
Namordi, Eyal Skokie 
Nashif, Marina Elgin 
Nation, Denise Chicago 
Naul, Julie Aurora 
Nayfeh, Hasan Urbana 
Neberieza, Amy Chicago 

Nedzel, Andrew Rolling Meadows 
Neiher^en, QinsBDpher Ariingpn Heigfils 
Nejman, Susan Oak Lawn 
Nellessen, Sarah Morton Grove 
Nesvacil, Robert Glendale Heights 
Neuendank, Laura Champaign 
Neuman, Corey Geneseo 
Newell, Jennifer Bonnie 

Newland, Alicia Morton 
Newman, Eve Highland Park 
Newton, Kathleen Chicago 
Ng, Dora Ontario, Canada 
Nguyen, Chaffee Urbana 
Nguyen, Elizabeth Rockford 
Nguyen, Phi Shorewood 
Nguyen, Tuan Dolton 



Graduates 



391 



I 







holson-Patel 



:ii 



■■xicliolson, Julie Palatine 

Nicola, Victor Hickory Hills 

Nicolandis, Calliope Chicago 

Nicpon, David Libertyville 

Niebrugge, Jeffrey Decatur 

Nieciecki, Catherine Northbrook 

Nielsen, William Hampshire 

Niemeyer, Susan Clarendon Hills 

Niemiec, Jennifer Pales Hills 

Nieng, Cathy Urbana 

Noble, Jill Morton 

Noonan, David Naperville 

Norgle, Regine Elmhurst 

Norris, Natalie Worden 

North, Raymond Wheaton 

Novak, Janna Darien 

Nowicki, Ralph McHenry 

Nowik, Kristie Bolingbreok 

Nowej, Adam Morton Grove 

Nudell, Marina Deerfield 

O'Connell, Christy Rockford 

O'Dennell, Bill Normal 

O'Leary, Erin Elmhurst 

O'Rely, Sean Naperville 

O'Shea, Brendan Cambridge, MA 

O'SuUivan, Jasen Addison 

Oberc, Jeremy Oak Forest 

Oberle, Janet Champaign 

Ocheco, Marie Lombard 

Oh, Helen Chicago 

Ohannes, Larry Glenview 

Ohotnicky, Susan Newburgh, IN 

Olefsky, Jayne Champaign 

OIkiewicz, Stacy Venon Hills 

Olriksen, Eric Long Grove 

Olson, Alicia St. Charles 

Ooms, Jennifer Chicago Heights 

Orkin, Bill Northbreok 

Ortiz, Brian Orland Park 

Osbern, Matt Belleville 

Osbron, Heather Yorkville 

Ostling, Karin Schaumburg 

Otocki, Ronald Darien 

Otsuka, Gregory Mokena 

Owens, Lisa Chicago 

Ozley, Suzanna Quincy 

Packard, John Peoria 

Padfield, Cory Champaign 

Padfield, Toby Centralia 

Palacie, Grace Morton Grove 

Palumbo, Joseph Munster, IN 

Papa, Joey Wheaton 

Paradis, Tina Hinckley 

Parikh, Khushali Buffalo (irove 

Parikh, Miraj Bloomingdale 

Parikh, Ritesh Glcndalc Heights 

Parr, Colleen Mason C.'ny 

Parsley, Jonathan Morris 

Parsons, Kathtrine Towanda 

Pasqucsi, Caroline Highland Park 

Pastore, John Lockpori 

Pataky, Alex Buffalo Grove 

Paid, Rajesh Wtstmont 

PattI, Vikas Dcs I'lamcs 




394 



Graduates 



Pater-Pottgen 




Pater, Derek t champaign 
Patterson, Melinda Chicago 
Paulsen, Heather Lake Villa 
Pauly, Lisa Lockport 
Paval, Michael Park Ridge 
Pawlak, Corelyn Palos Heights 
Paxton, John Pittsfield 
Pearl, Julie Champaign 

Pearson, Erica St. Louis, MO 
Peck, Andrea Champaign 
Peck, Nicole Countryside 
Pecoraro Giacomo Springfield 
Pedro, Tamara Ogden 
Pedroza, Kim Schaumburg 
Peerless, Brian Cincinnati, OH 
Pelaez, Antoinette Chicago 

Perez, Linda Alsip 
Perkinson, Aaron Onarga 
Peroulas, Thomas Chicago 
Perri, Stephanie Des Plaines 
Perry, Vanessa Chicago 
Perschke, Carolyn Crystal Lake 
Perz, Elizabeth Mt. Prospect 
Peters, John Benton 

Peters, Krista Rockford 
Peters, Timothy Danforth 
Petersen, Tyler Morton 
Petersen, Victoria LibertyviUe 
Peterson, Ann Urbana 
Peterson, Brian St. Charles 
Peterson, Clifford Port Byron 
Peterson, Stephen Kewanee 

Petros, Dean Champaign 
Petroskey, Karen Wheaton 
Pfaffinger, Cristine Des Plaines 
Pfile, Tammy Elgin 
Pfister, Daniel Rockford 
Phelan, Carla joliet 
Phillabaum, Tracy Glen Ellyn 
Phillips, Mark Champaign 

Pickens, Mitchell Mollison 
Pierce, Krisin Godfrey 
Pietsch, Michael Decatur 
Pinks, Kelly Chester 
Pinto, Jennifer Palos Hills 
Pinzino, David Homewood 
Piper, Stephanie Galesburg 
Piraino, Michael South Barrington 

Pistorius, Jill Blue Mound 
Pitman, Michele Carlinville 
Plummer, Adam Highland Park 
Podrebarac, Rebecca Lemont 
Podusca, Brian Buffalo Grove 
Poeschel, Timothy Schaumburg 
Pogue, Carissa Altamont 
Pokryfke, Leann Roselle 

Poluchowicz, Andrei Kildecr 
Pomering, Grant Champaign 
Pomis, Aaron Crystal Lake 
Poole, Rodney Champaign 
Porch, Sherri Calumet Park 
Portnoy, Leslie Wheeling 
Potempa, Robert Bolingbrook 
Pottgen, Jennifer Wexford, PA 



Graduates 



395 



ell-Robert 



Powell, Marwan Chicago 

Pozen, Brian Gary 

Pozen, Patricia Villa Park 

Prather, Penelope Centralia 

Preissner, Paul Barrington 

Probst, Christopher Wheeler 

Propst, Jason Smithfield 

Provinse, Jason Chesterfield, MO 

Pruski, Susan Palatine 

Pryor, Matthew Champaign 

PuUen, Frances Charleston 

Pytiak, Steven Elm wood Park 

Qi, Sumin Urbana 

Quartullo, Anthony Berwyn 

Quinn, Eric Geneva 

Quinn, Megan Glen Ellyn 

Quinn, Scott Mt. Vernon 

Quinn, Tiffany Chicago 

Rachell, Kristie St. Louis, MO 

Rackoff, Jarret Dew City, NY 

Rademacher, Matthew Grant Park 

Rader, Jeannine Wheaton 

Rader, Julie Carlock 

Rader, Kent St. Charles 

Radovich, Jennifer Geneva 

Rahman, Santano Champaign 

Randle, LaDonna Champaign 

Randolph, Travis Mt. Carmel 

Rathsack, Ben Springfield 

Raver, Lance Rantoul 

Ray, Melissa St. Louis, MO 

Raymond, Brittini Bushnell 

Reed, China Chicago 

Reed, Mildred Chicago 

Reeder, David Quincy 

Reep, Erin Melvin 

Reese, Shanon Danville 

Reffett, Eric Winfield 

Reinish, Julie Deerfield 

Reitzel, Jason ^''"''"" 

Remotigue, Jeffrey Chicago 

Renken, Dana Lomax 

Renner, Jennifer Crystal Lake 

Retana, Susana Chicago 

Reyes, Nicole Westerville, OH 

Reza, Debbie Chicago 

Rice, Amy Rockford 

Rice, Eric Acton, MA 

Rice, Melissa Galesburg 

Richard, Paul Decatur 

Richards, Beth New Lenox 

Richardson, Amy Peoria 

Richardson, Gerard Mt. Zion 

Richardson, Paul Urbana 

Richman, Chris Metamorm 

Rithler, Shane Stillwater, MN 

Riekc, Jeanettt Atirora 

Kiggins, Andrew Motomb 

Rinkcr, Tracy Grand Ridge 

Rios, Irish ( Jakbrook 

Risberg, Christopher Palaiiiic 

Rising, Erin Aurora 

Ro, Shelley (Chicago 

Robert, Matthew Smyrii.i 




396 



Graduates 



College students often have a tight 
budget for extra spending money. That 
money can go toward a variety of things 
like food, clothes, entertainment or gifts. 
Entertainment is a must to get a break 
from those long dreaded 
homework assignments. 

On Thursday and 
Friday nights, the streets 
are crawling with people 
going to the bars. This 
can be a fun time and an 
easy way to spend the 
night without thinking 
about assignments due 
on Monday morning. 
However, many costs are 
incurred throughout the 
evening. 

For example, if a cou- 
ple went out for an 
evening and decided to 
splurge, they might have 
chosen a nice dinner 
with a stop by the bars 
afterwards. A nice meal 
for two people can cost 
around $20. Cover to get 
into bars ranges from $3- 
$10. Once inside, the 
couple may have a few 
drinks and ring up a bill 
of approximately $20. By 
the time the night is over, 
this couple has spent 
$40-$50. 

This could be a very 
bad habit to repeat sever- 
al times a month if they 
need to keep an eye on 
their budgets. It is often nice to indulge 
once in a while, but this is not the only 
form of fim. Some people might not be 
able to think of many activities that cost 
under $5, but there are quite a few. 

Tanya Brooks, junior in ALS, has many 
dates that take her out for dinner or to 
the bars for drinks. She thinks that an 



^vhat 

happens 

when 

money 




evening walk down the Quad by the 
Eternal Flame can be very romantic and 
relaxing. Here people are not crammed 
into a small space fighting each other. 
"A lot of people also play roller blad- 
ing games at night," 
Brooks said. She and 
her friends often go 
roller blading during 
the day as well as in 
the evening and watch 
others play roller blade 
tag on the Quad by the 
Union. 

Tracy Victorine, 
senior in Engineering, 
is kept very busy with 
her studies. Her friends 
rarely see her procras- 
tinating. Instead she 
buries herself in 
Granger Library with 
her textbooks. Once in 
a while, though, she 
does take breaks to 
maintain her sanity. 

"If we have time, we 
go roller blading," she 
said. Another stress 
reliever for Victorine is 
running. 

"Last year we played 
Twister on the Quad," 
Mitun Gupta, junior in 
CBA, said, "The game 
was willed to me by a 
graduating senior in 
my sorority house." 
At the time Gupta 
thought it was absurd. 
"Random people kept coming up to us 
and asking if they could play. It was a 
lot of fun," Gupta said. The innocent 
game started with two couples and 
ended with a lot of new friends. 

Contrary to popular belief, a lot of fun 
can be had on this campus while spend- 
ing veiy little money. 



tight: 

having 

fun 

on a 
budget 

layo u t by Jill Koga n 
story by Amie Megginson 



Graduates 



397 



:oberts-Sanche2 



t 



ill 



Roberts, Marcus Decatur 

Roberts, Rachel Chicago 

Robertson, Thessa Chicago 

Robinson, Angela Bloomington 

Robinson, Cindy Greencastle, IN 

Robinson, Eric Hanover Park 

Robinson, Rebecca Champaign 

Rockenbach, Barbara St. Charles 

Roden, Rebecca Crystal Lake 

Roesslein, Kent Mt. Prospect 

Roger, Eric Chicago 

Rogers, Dennie Tyree Chicago 

Rogers, Kolette Chicago 

Rogowski, Wendy Palatine 

Rohr, Michael Moline 

Roitstein, Carrie Omaha, NE 

Rojanavongse, Nisa Chicago 

Rolf, Donna Arenzville 

Romano, Elizabeth Chicago 

Rooney, Bill Elmwood Park 

Roos, Diana Homewood 

Roper, Reginald Chicago 

Rosado, Jacqueline Cicero 

Rosas, Sarah Champaign 

Rosen, Mary Lombard 

Rosenfeld, Lisa Schaumburg 

Ross, Rebecca Gladstone 

Rosy, Chris Itasca 

Rottach, Timothy Arlington Heights 

Rottman, Aaron Gibson City 

Roubal, Victoria Gurnee 

Roupas, Stacie Palos Park 

Rozewicz, Todd Waukegan 

Rozgus, Amara Chicago 

Ruben, Rebecca Buffalo Grove 

Rubinson, Yori Barak Skokie 

Rudnick, Gregory Chicago 

Rue, Matthew Granville 

Ruff, Angela Avon 

Ruiz, Jose Guaynabo, PR 

Ruiz, Teresa Belvidere 

Rungsang, Ruttha Skokie 

Ruoti, Robert Addison 

Ruppert, Chad Witt 

Russell, Brian Des Plaines 

Saarnio, Eric Naperville 

Saban, Nicholas Monticello 

Sabbert, Becky Champaign 

Sabo, Renee Elgin 

Sacchitello, Angela Arlington Heights 

Saed, Alexis Winnetka 

Sage, Troy Fhomasboro 

Sahr, Angela Oak Lawn 

Sala, Steven Herrin 

Salamone, Michatl Arlington Hciglits 

Salasche, Dayna Libcrtyvillc 

Saleh, Tania Lisle 

Sallas, I'aulette Skokie 

Sallis, Joy Rockford 

Saltzman, (-raig Norihhrook 

Sampson, Barry IVicrslnirg 

Sams, Michael Hloomingion 

SanbonmaLsu, lainaini BuHalo ( /rove 

Sanchez, Maria (-liit.igo 




398 



Graduates 



Sanchez-Shannon 




Sanchez, Rosa Chicago 
Sanchez, Theresa Chicago 
Sanders, David Gibson City 
Sanders, Shana Skokie 
Sanders, Weston Peoria 
Sanderson, Lisa Frankfort 
Sanghavi, Dhaval Downers Grove 
Saunders, Kendra Champaign 

Savino, Pamela Elk Grove Village 
Sceisi, Michael Mt. Prospect 
Schad, Lesley Havana 
Schaefer, Scott Harvard 
SchafFer, Brenda Des Plaines 
SchafFner, Jodi Chicago 
Schell, Jeanne Glendora, CA 
Schenk, Rebecca Mt. Sterling 

Scher, Niclas Belleville 
Scherer, Mark Matavia 
Schieffer, Sara Libertyville 
Schilling, Daphne Smithton 
Schilling, Mark Waterloo 
Schimmel, Kim Chicago 
Schirer, Jeremy Oregon 
Schlarb, Matthew Crystal Lake 

Schlueter, Michael Belleville 
Schmidt, Brian Morristown, NJ 
Schmidt, Colin Mt. Morris 
Schmidt, Elizabeth Naperville 
Schmidt, Jonathan Champaign 
Schmidutz, Laura Glenview 
Schmitt, Aimee Oak Park 
Schmitt, Kelly South Barrington 

Schmitt, Kimberly Oak Park 
Schmitz, Ann Marquette Heights 
Schnable, Ingrid Bloomington, MN 
Schneblin, Adam East Peoria 
Schneider, David Rushville 
Schneider, Elissa Evanston 
Schneider, Jeffrey Chicago 
Schneider, Michael Barrington 

Schroeder, Beth Wheeling 
Schrof, Derek Forrest 
Schuler, Jill Peoria 
Schultz, Mindy Wheaton 
Schultz, Natalie Naperville 
Schwartz, Amy Clarendon Hills 
Schwartz, Nathan Rochelle 
Schweiss, Thomas Ingleside 

Schwetz, Shelly Schaumburg 
Scott, Michele Chicago 
Seabold, Kristin Aurora 
Seegmiller, Anne Gibson Ciry 
Semeniuk, Tanya Toronto, Canada 
Sensenbrermer, Sara Glendale Heights 
Septon, Brian Deerfield 
Serafin, Andrew Arlington Heights 

Seraphin, Brigitte Sugar Grove 
Sergio, Cathy Itasca 
Seribo, Virg Barrington 
Serrano, Roxana Chicago 
Shaffer, Kevin Lake Zurich 
Shah, Anil Frankfort 
Shandling, Alissa Northbrook 
Shannon, Edward Schaumburg 



Graduates 



399 



(haul-Speckan 



I 



Shaul, David Ch 

Shaw, Carli Ch 

Shea, Mike Los Anj 

Shea, Timothy 

Shells, Shannon 

Shepherd, Brent 

Shepston, Shad Ch 

Sherlock, Jennifer 



ampaign 
ampaign 
;eles, CA 
Chicago 
Belleville 
Danville 
ampaign 
Godfrey 



Shibia, William Chicago 

Shirley, Robert Mt. Prospect 

Showalter, Michelle Du Quoin 

Shule, Christopher Antiuch 

Shunk, Daniel Hume 

Shunk, Donald Champaign 

Sibaja, Hector Des Plaines 

Sibley, Tricia Springfield 

Sieffert, Margaret Palos Heights 

Sienko, Gary Shorewood 

Sikich, Jennifer Bristol 

Siller, Catherine Wheaton 

Simnett, Katherine Rockford 

Simon, Heather Longwood, FL 

Simon, Keith Deertield 

Sims, Michael Willowbrook 

Singer, Allison Buffalo Grove 

Sipes, Dallas Hampshire 

Siska, Elizabeth Wheaton 

Sison, Charlene Chicago 

Sitabkhan, Nazneen Naperville 

Skaggs, Kristi Urbana 

Skeldon, Shane Joliet 

Skelton, Matthew Mt. Prospect 

Skinner, Tom Quincy 

Sladek, Ember Edwardsville 

Sloat, Amy Foosland 

Slowik, Jean Westchester 

Slusar, Karen Winfield 

Small, Andrew Champaign 

Smart, Melissa Gendale Heights 

Smeaton, Richard Winfield 

Smith, Abigail Elburn 

Smith, April Blandinsville 

Smith, Dan Urbana 

Smith, Elizabeth Richmond, VA 

Smith, Julie Godfrey 

Smith, Melissa Champaign 

Smith, Nicole Urbana 

Smith, Trent Bclviderc 

Smittkamp, Charles Normal 

Snap, Amy Waukegan 

Snitker, April St. ("harlcs 

Snyder, Jennifer Palatine 

Sobun, Darlene Daricn 

Soderstrom, Britt Aurora 

Sohn, Sascha I.incolnwood 

Song, Jibaek C'hicago 

Sons, Jeffrey Ionics 

Soraghan, Tobi Orland Park 

.Sorkin, Harlan Mahomet 

.Soto, Louis Wheeling 

Spalding, Angela ( !hampaign 

Spanjoi, Jclena Urban. i 

Spears, Marcum ManmoMili 

Spetkan, I'.ric Vcriiiin llilK 




400 



Graduates 



the best places to 
be around campus 



Bookstores 

T.I.S. 

T.I.S. Too 

mini Union Bookstore 

Follett's 

Notes-N-Quotes 

Bars 

Clybourne 

BW-3 

C. O. Daniel's 

Kam's 

C-S treet 

Cochrane's 

Tooter's 

Coffee Shops 

International Cafe 

Cafe Kopi 

Daily Grind 

Espresso Royale 



Shopping 

Marketplace Mall 

Sam's Club 

Wal-Mart 

Meijer 

Lincoln Square 

Mall 

K-Mart 

Best Buy 

Menard's 




-l*jiil Grand 

Hanging out at the Urbana Espresso is a 
great way to unwind. Grace Hwang and 
Ayesha Kiian, seniors in LAS, drink coffee 
and catch up on things. 



H ango uts 

Delights 

Bub's 

White Horse 

The mini Orange 

Romantic Spots 

South Farms 
Under Bleachers on South 

Side of Stadium 

On the Quad Late at Night 

Old Astronomy Observatory 

Eternal Flame (by Lincoln Hall) 



Study Places 

Granger Library 

Undergraduate Library 

Coffee Shops 

Union 

Under a Tree on the Quad 

Outside the Psychology 

Building 

One World Cafe 



Fast Food 

A.J. Wingers 

Papa Del's 

La Bambas 

Steak N Shake 

Wendy ' s 

Burger King 

Papa John's 

Garcia's 

Jimmy John's 

St. Louis Bread Co. 

Subway 

Restaurants 

Pickles' Food and Fun 

Courier Cafe 

Minneci's Ristorante 

Red Lobster 

Mountain Jack's 

Ned Kelly's 



Graduates 



401 



If I 



escaping 

the 

drudgery 

of classes 

^th a T^^ell- 

deserved 

spring 

vacation 

layout by Bill Hynes 
story by Tanya Brooks 






What two words elicit dreamy 
smiles, sighs of happiness and looks 
of mischief in the eyes of all stu- 
dents? Spring break, of course. It is a 
time of relaxation, fun and perhaps 
even some travel. 

Many students opt for sun, sand 
and tropical waters. Popular destina- 
tions are Florida, South Padre Island, 
Cancun and the Bahamas. Other stu- 
dents seek adventure and thrills, so 
they may go to Walt Disney World in 
Florida or Las Vegas. But some peo- 
ple just want to go back to their 
hometown for a visit with their fami- 
ly or significant other. 

Jenny Hawkins, sophomore in ALS, 
is one of those people. She has never 
gone to any exotic place for spring 
break. She has always gone home to 
see her family and boyfriend. 

"Having a close-knit family is very 
important to me, and I would never 
pass up the chance to spend time 
with them," she stated. 

Her roommate Bridgette Deleon 
agreed. "I would rather spend quali- 
ty time with my boyfriend than be 
on the beach getting a tan. Our feel- 
ings toward each other will last a lot 
longer than my tan ever will." 

For those who like to travel far 
away from home, a little extra cash 
is required. Brenda Lattanzio, senior 
in LAS, went to the Bahamas last 
year with a few of her friends. They 
had booked the reservations only a 
week in advance, but still got a real- 
ly good deal. 

"The hotel we stayed at was off of 
the main strip, but it didn't matter. We 
had no problem meeting people," 
Lattanzio said. "We met a bunch of 
guys from the University of Wisconsin 
on the plane, and they ended up 
staying at the same hotel. They were 
really fun to hang out with both on 



the beach and at the clubs." 

A destination that requires cold 
hard cash is Las Vegas. Carrie Keane, 
junior in ALS, went to Las Vegas to 
try her luck. She said she was visit- 
ing friends at the University at 
Nevada, Las Vegas, and they went 
with her to see if Lady Luck was on 
their side. Apparently, she was not. 
Carrie lost $30 that day, but her 
friend Dave lost even more. 

"We went to Harrah's and he was 
only playing Blackjack for about ten 
minutes, but he lost $600 in that 
short amount of time," said Keane. 

Others seek the cold instead of 
the typical hot weather. Many stu- 
dents head for the slopes in search 
of white powder. Debbie Hannula, 
sophomore in LAS, planned on 
going to British Columbia with her 
family for some downhill skiing. 

"I hope my dad makes the plane 
reservations soon," she said, "other- 
wise I will go down to Florida for 
some water skiing." 

Lastly, there are students who do 
not specifically seek either the 
warmth of the sun or the cold, 
snowy weather. They are just out to 
explore new territory. 

Sara Sensenbrenner, senior in 
Education, plans on renting a car 
and going on a road trip. 

"My roommates and I will plan ooi 
getting a reliable car or van and 
heading south," Sensenbrenner said. I 
"We were thinking of going to 
Graceland to see Elvis' home and 
grave, and maybe hit the Grand Olei 
Opry, too." 

Whether it be new or familiar, hot 
or cold, places to go on spring 
loreak mean one thing ~ an escape 
from the monotony and drudgery of 
school. It is a time o{ relaxaticMi and 
rejuvenation. 



402 



Graduates 



Speir-Tang 




Speir, Lawrence Albion 
Spence, Fiona Chicago 
Sperry, Jonathan Champaign 
Spink, Clark Oak Park 
Spires, Judith Olympia Fields 
Sprague, William Hoopeston 
Sprechman, Sandi Arlington Heights 
Spurlock, Anthony St. Joseph 

Squires, Kelley Adee, lA 
Stachula, Joseph Minooka 
Stadel, Jennifer Freeport 
StagI, Kristin Crystal Lake 
Stahl, Charles Inverness 
Stajduhar, Michael West Chicago 
Stalets, Erika Pana 
Stall, Jeff Naperville 

Stambaugh, Brandon Jacksonville 
Stanish, Jeffrey Crystal Lake 
Stanley, Kimberly Herrin 
Starkey, Colleen Orland Park 
Stawarz, Scott Champaign 
Stebbins, David Spring Valley 
Steele, John Sherrard 
Stefanski, Anne Oak Park 

Steimel, Jennifer DeKalb 
Steinkamp, Diane Centralia 
Stephenson, Claire Lancaster, PA 
Sternhell, Paul Champaign 
Sternshein, Erica Deerfield 
Sterritt, Douglas Morris 
Stettin, Megan Burr Ridge 
Stevenson, Megan Geneva 

Stiglic, Jeffrey Orland Park 
Stirrett, Frederick Effingham 
Stokes, Kathryn El Paso 
Stoltz, Stephanie Palatine 
Storbakken, Shawn Bloomington 
Storm, Lisa Tolono 
Stotts, Retha East Moline 
Stout, Barry Crystal Lake 

Straub, Tim Stawnton 
Strunk, Dawn Champaign 
Strzelinski, Rachel Thornton 
Stuber, Jason Tremont 
Sturm, Brian O Fallon 
Stutz, Cindy Bartlett 
Sublette, Stacy University Park 
Sudduth, Matt Decatur 

Sulgit, Nicole Naperville 
Sullivan, Mike Mason City 
Sullivan, Matthew Chicago 
Summerville, London Louisville, KY 
Sunardio, Kadir Champaign 
Supalo, Susie Bolingbrook 
Suranik, Todd Oconomowoc, Wl 
Suthers, Laurie Arlington Heights 

Svoboda, Susan Addison 
Swanson, Mary Lincoln 
Swartz, Jeff Deland 
Szubka, Thomas Urbana 
Tabour, Paul Geneva 
Tai, Chiao Chicago 
Takhtehchian, Kurosh Glenview 
Tang, Gail Willowbrook 



Graduates 



403 



Tang-VanGeel 



Tang, Tze-John Urbana 

Tanner, Craig Speer 

Tanny, David Arlington Heights 

Tartir, Zain Westchester 

Tate, Jennifer Stewardson 

Taylor, Kyle Flossmor 

Taylor, Simone Chicago 

Teaschner, Dawn Champaign 

Tebben, Shannon Pekin 

Tebo, Erica Tinley Park 

Teckenbrock, Casey Urbana 

Teelucksingh, Edward Willowbrk 

Teiken, Emily Crystal Lake 

Tempia, Nicole O'Fallen 

Teodorescu, Mihai Westchester 

Tesdall, Katey Morris 

Thatcher, J. C. St. Charles 

Thayer, John Gregg Hanover Park 

Theodorakis, Athena Wheaton 

Thomas, Christopher Wavcrh 

Thompson, Erin loiiica 

Thompson, Terry Urbana 

Thomson, Mandy Rocktord 

Thulin, Amy Lockport 

Thurmaier, David Northfieid 

Tieche, Christopher Rockford 

Tillman, Sheree Hanover Park 

Tomaszewska Margeret Lake Forest 

Tomczak, Melanie Madison, Wl 

Tompkins, Jason Cuba 

Tong, Sau Loon Champaign 

Toosley, Adam Frankfort 

Toreja, Evelyn Urbana 

Tortorello, Peter South Shorewood 

Trawczynski, Michael Elk Crove 

Treccia, Sean Elmhurst 

Treseler, Kristie Petersburg 

Trinh, Hoa Morton 

Trommer Matthew Lincoln 

Trottier, Aimee Elmhurst 

Trubiano, Steve Orland Park 

Truckenbrod, Annie McHenry 

Tsai, Chuan-Lin Alice Rockford 

Tsai, Jehan Medinah 

Tucci, Yolanda Hinsdale 

Tucker, Osiris E. St. Louis 

Tuggle, Brent Chrisman 

Tully, Annie Chicago 

Turacek, Heidi Northlake 

Turek, Jason Carol Stream 

Turner, Emily Molinc 

Turpoff, Anthony [Rockford 

Ulicni, Brica Hinsdale 

Underwood, Rebecca Channahon 

Unzicker, Jacob Champaign 

Urbanik, .Sandra Barrington 

Urcna, (Christina Sth.iumburg 

Utterback, Pamela Weldon 

Valencia, Edwin Skokie 

Vales, Elizabeth Southlake, TX 

Van Dyne, Jenna Nebo 

Van Santcn, Victor Oak Park 

Van Wig, Nicole Round Lake Beach 

Van dec!, Michael Urban. i 




404 



Graduates 



whenever the Illini scores, the Illini 

Spikers yell "point Illini." Spikers 

get involved in many aspects of the 

team, including helping the coach 

ing staff recruit new players. 



Spirit 

reigns 

supreme 

layout by Jill Kogan 
story by Debbie Williams 




Being the only official cheering 
section for a women's sport, the 
group known as Spikers is an elite 
in its class. Beginning more than ten 
years ago, Spikers has grown to be 
one of the most popular cheering 
sections at the U of I. The group has 
increased attendance at the women's 
volleyball games, increased its own 
membership and, most importantly, 
increased the morale of the players. 

In order to be a member of the 
group, one has to be a member of 
Illini Pride and posess a great 
amount of school spirit. Interested 
members simply show up at the 
games and, after attending a certain 
amount of volleyball games, a group 
T-shirt is issued and one is an offi- 
cial member of Spikers. 

"Spikers is one of our most popu- 
lar activities to be in," said Matt 
Goben, senior in CBA and president 
of Illini Pride. 

Each year, Spikers boasts an 
increased attendance in both its own 
membership and at the games in 
general. Just this year, the member- 
ship increased from between 50 and 
70 people per game to between 80 
and 100 people per game. 

"Volleyball is really exciting and 
there's constant action," said Mark 
Mosbarger, senior in Agriculture and 
Spikers co-chairman. "People get 
hooked on it and they just keep 



coming back." 

Besides just cheering at the games, 
Spikers do a whole lot more. The co- 
chairs work closely with the coach- 
ing staff in order to provide the team 
with the best support possible. The 
members of Spikers decorate the 
women's locker room before the 
games, yell at the referees when bad 
calls are made and try to intimidate 
the other team. The group also plans 
a road trip each year. This past sea- 
son, Spikers made a trip to Purdue 
University to support the Illini. 

In addition to suppoiting the team, 
members of Spikers help the coach- 
ing staff with reciTiiting new players. 
The coaches arrange for prospective 
players to meet with Spikers and sit 
with them during the game. The 
Spiker talks with the reciTiit during 
the game about the many advantages 
of becoming a member of the team 
as well as what it may be like being 
a Big Ten athlete. 

Jason Smith, junior in LAS and 
Spikers co-chairman, said, "Being a 
member of Spikers is an easy way to 
get involved in a Big Ten sport at a 
higher level than just being a specta- 
tor." 

If you posess an al:>undance of 
spirit and pride in the Illini and have 
no outlet for it, check out Spikers 
and become a part of history in the 
making. 



Graduates 



405 



i 



science is 

catching 

up with 

science 

fiction 

layout by Jill Kogan 
story by Peter Mackay 



On the walls of all the campus 
computer sites are posted a variety 
of warnings: No Food Or Drink!, 
Save Your Work Often! and No 
Gaming, MUDs or IRC! What does 
that mean, MUDs and IRC, anyway? 
Well, MUD, which at one time was 
an acronym for multi-user dungeon, 
and IRC, which stands for inter- 
relay chat, were the most basic 
forms of virtual reality (VR) in use 
today. On the internet, these virtual 
reality, or VR worlds, connected lit- 
erally thousands of people from 
most countries on the globe in a 
text-based world created purely 
from the imagination. 

Now why is it called virtual reali- 
ty? Virtual means almost and reality 
refers to the world in which we live. 
So, users of these VR worlds could 
describe their own version of a 
Utopia, and interact with other users 
who could be as far as 10,000 miles 
away. 

Jennifer Garcia, sophomore in 
LAS, said, "Well, I started with e- 
mail, and now I use MUDs to talk to 
my friends who are at different 
schools. It's really wonderful that we 
can talk without any delay and we 
can do it in a virtual environment of 
our own creation." 

At the other end of the spectrum 
were the high-tech creations that 
could only be found in the secure 
areas of the Beckman Institute on 
the north end of campus. There, 
computer wizards worked on creat- 
ing real versions of the items seen in 
Hollywood movies. Items used for 



this purpose included a special set 
of goggles for viewing the 3-D com- 
puter generated world, a pair of tac- 
tile gloves that allowed you to feel 
your way around the world and a 
special headset that allowed you to 
hear sounds in 3-D. 

Frank Wang, a graduate student 
and an avid computer game player 
said, "Games and other applications 
are the driving force behind the cre- 
ation of newer and faster computers. 
And, as the computers get more 
advanced, games get more realistic 
in appearance, but there's a limit to 
how real a game can seem as long 
as you're confined to looking at the 
computer screen." 

As movies and television made 
virtual reality popular with visions of 
people fully interacting with one 
another in a computer generated 
world, science was attempting to 
catch up and actually create these 
futuristic toys. Some companies had 
already adopted minor VR devices to 
help in the design of products. 

Matthew Ford, senior in 
Engineering, said of a company he 
interviewed with, "They're using an 
imaging system that allows the com- 1 
puter operator to create aircraft partsi 
using a flat screen monitor, the 
glasses the operator wears allow for 
3-D vision." 

It would seem that science was 
catching up to science fiction. And 
possibly, we could look foi-ward to 
the day when a phone call to your 
long distance boyfriend or girlfriend 
could be much more intimate. 



406 



Graduates 




-Illio hit- photo 

In the Beckman Institute, items such as a 
special set of goggles for viewing the 3-D 
computer generated world, were being cre- 
ated. Shawn Doherty, graduate student, 
models a version of these special 3-D acces- 
sories. 



Graduates 



407 



I 



i 




VanLandeghem- wheeler 






Van Landeghem, Bridget Paris 

Vanderkooy, Kelly Machesney Park 

Vandervelde, Tiffany Richton Park 

Vaughan, Derek Rockford 

Vazzana, Christopher Palos Hills 

Venters, Allan Indianola 

Viar, Stephanie Springfield 

Vickers, Justin Danville 

Victorine, Tracy Buffalo Grove 

Villa, Vivian Chicago 

Vinyard, Jennifer Vienna 

Vlasak, Andrea Olympia Fields 

Vogelsang, Jana Rantoul 

Volkman, Karen Belleville 

Von Behren, Jennifer Champaign 

Vondr?k, Gretchen Ashkum 

Wade, Michelle Sterling 

Wagner, Jonathan Ogden 

Wainscott, Heather Jacksonville 

Waldhauser, Jann Chatham 

Waldschmidt, Kristin Mokena 

Waiicek, Holly Bartlett 

Walk, Brad Sigel 

Walker, Bryce Chicago 

Walker, Robert Rantoul 

Wall, Gemma Darien 

Wallisch, Thomas Hazelwood, MO 

Walsh, Kathy Aurora 

Walsh, Liz Clarendon Hills 

Walsh, Tricia Arlington Heights 

Wamsley, Rachael Mt. Vernon 

Wang, Andrew Flossmoor 

Ward, Erin Palatine 

Ward, Kristin Naperville 

Ward, Nicole Oklahoma City, OK 

Warncke, Melinda Villa Park 

Warner, Barton Elgin 

Warp, Christine Hoffman Estates 

Waters, David Tinley Park 

Watkins, Elizabeth Macomb 

Watts, Stephanie Champaign 

Weber, Brian Peoria 

Webster, Margaret Toulon 

Weddle, Corey Bethany 

Weichel, Lenae Naperville 

Weis, Katherine Lisle 

Weiss, Meredith Deerfield 

Welsh, Erin Winchester 

Welsh, Jennifer (jood Hope 

Wen, Amy Urbana 

Wendling, Kimberly South Elgin 

Wendt, Rosalyn Skokic 

Wernle, Jason O'lallcn 

Werve, Rana Mt. Atiburn 

Wesoloski, Karen Kankakee 

Wcssel, Jason Bay Village, OH 

West, Derek Norris (^ity 

West, lamara Elmhurst 

Westerman, Michelle Palos Hills 

Wcstphal, Cynthia Hast Dundee 

Wheat, Gabriclla ("hampaign 

Wheal, Julienne SpringfieUI 

Wheatley, Megan I.awrenccville, CA 

Wheeler, Gregg liberiyvillc 




410 



Graduates 



White-Zall 




White, Brad Savoy 
White, Christopher Glendale Heights 
Whitelock, Christine Champaign 
Whitlow, James Normal 
Wiater, Sandra Hanover Park 
Wickham, Douglas St. Charles 
Wiesbrook, Scott Mineral 
Wiewel, Chandra Quincy 

Wiland, Kevin Huntington, NY 
Williams, Amy Woodstock 
Williams, Cheryl Chicago 
Williams, David Canton 
Williams, Debbie Rockford 
Williams, Katie Algonquin 
Williams, Mark Okawville 
Williams, Michael Champaign 

Williams, Tiffany Decatur 
Williksen, Erik Barington 
Willis, Chad Monmouth 
Willis, Darby Highland Park 
Wilner, David Buffalo Grove 
Wilson, Scott Homewood 
Wiltz, Sarah East Peoria 
Winkelmann, Julie Naperville 

Winker, Karen Mt. Prospect 
Winnett, Erin Hillsboro 
Wise, Laura Park Ridge 
Wiseman, Alan Glenview 
Wiseman, Eric Browns 
Witter, Janet Barnhill 
Woertz, Jennifer Washington 
Wolfe, Richard Albion 

Wolff, Kimberly Champaign 
Wollard, Jason West Frankfort 
Wong, Benjamin Skokie 
Wong, Eugene Urbana 
Wong, Felicia Urbana 
Wong, Ha Kung Mundelein 
Wong, Joanne Springfield 
Wong, Man Yee Champaign 

Wons, Richard Grayslake 
Woods, Tyrone North Chicago 
Worman, Melissa Effingham 
Wozniak, Karen Bridgeview 
Wright, Heather Springfield 
Wright, Kathryn Urbana 
Wright, Timothy Naperville 
Wright, Tracilynn Oak Park 

Wu, Bei Woodridge 
Wu, Susan Naperville 
Wydra, Brian Clarendon Hills 
Wyzinski, Nicole Cresrwood 
Yacouby, Tahani Danville 
Yacullo, Beth Schaumburg 
Yang, Arthur East Brunswick. Nj 
Yi, Ann Peoria 

Yopchick, Eric Chicago 
Yost, Meredith Godfrey 
Young, Tamara Simpsonville, KY 
Youngblood, Mary Alton 
Zage, Kristin Schaumberg 
Zaiz, David Belleville 
Zakrzewski, Eric Chicago 
Zall, Jonathan Burke, VA 



GRADUATES 



41 1 






goin' to 

the 

chapel 

and Tv^e're 

gonna get 

married 

layout by Jill Kogan 
story by Debbie Williams 





shopping tor flowers lor their bridal boLi- 
quets, Debbie Williams, senior in Ixlucation 
and Hmily Downes, senior in ALS, visit 
Prairie Gardens in Champaign. Both brides- 
to-be are having their bou(|iiets made out 
ot silk t'lovvers in oixler to s;i\e a little 

money. 



Bridal showers and bachelor par- 
ties — these are just some of the 
things that run through the minds of 
a newly engaged couple, their 
friends and family. Once the initial 
excitement wears off, reality sets in 
and the actual planning of the wed- 
ding must begin. As if booking a 
photographer, reserving the church 
and reception hall, compiling a list 
of guests that will make everyone 
happy and ordering what seems like 
a million invitations are not difficult 
enough, try planning a wedding 
while one or both of you are still in 
school. 

Recently, it seems like more and 
more students are getting engaged 
while still in school. This can only 
mean that more students are tiying 
to plan a wedding on top of study- 
ing and completing the requirements 
needed to graduate. 

Many of these 
couples find it 
difficult to con- 
centrate on their 
studies, especially 
right after getting 
engaged and dur- 
ing the last few 
months before the 
wedding, which 
seem to be the 
most exciting and 
stressful times. 

"You need a lot 
of support from 
your family and 
fiance to be able 
to plan a wedding 
while dealing 
with all the stress- 
es of school," said 
Suzanne 
Kucha rczyk, 
senior in 
Education. 
Finding the time to make all of 
the arrangements is also a problem 
faced by many couples who are gel- 
ting married. This can be especially 
hard when you attend class during 
the day and many of the people you 



have to see are only available during 
business hours. That leaves only twc 
options: skipping class, which can 
sometimes be a problem or trying tc 
make special arrangements with the 
businesses. 

Also, if the wedding is in another 
town, making time to travel home 
can cause some difficulties. Many 
students do not have the time to 
travel home every weekend to make 
plans. Having someone at home to 
help make the contacts and some of 
the arrangements does help, but 
usually it is not enough. 

Mike Pietsch, senior in LAS, said, 
"Our wedding is going to be in 
Rockford and trying to find time to 
drive up there is really difficult. 
We've been planning the wedding 
for over a year and it still seems like 
there's never enough time to study 
and make plans." 

These days, many couples are 
looking for ways to save money anc 
cut corners when planning a wed- 
ding. Some people choose to make 
their own flower arrangements with 
silk flowers. This cuts the cost of 
buying real flowers and paying a 
florist to create the designs. 
Switching from a full dinner recep- 
tion to one with appetizers and cak( 
is another way to save money. 
Having a reception at someone's 
home is a great way to make a 
memorable reception and save 
money at the same time. 

"My fiance and I are having our 
reception at my parent's home," saic 
Emily Downes, senior in ALS. "The 
main reason isn't to save money, bii 
to make it more friendly and inti- 
mate for my family and friends. 
Saving money is just an added 
bonus. I'm also haxing my mom 
make my boucjuet and all of the 
flower arrangements. " 

"While planning a wedding may h 
one of the most stressful times iti ii 
couple's life, it will be worth it w ho 
that day finally comes and ex'eiy- 
ihing comes together to make an 
extraordinarily memorable day. 



412 



Graduates 



Zamir-Zumwalt 




Zamir, Eran Arlington Heights 
Zarno, Kimberly Mt. Prospect 
Zavala, Leticia Milford 
Zelaya, Pedro Springfield 
Zents, Brian Littleton, CO 
Zimka, Ami Algonquin 
Zimmerman, Shanna Griggsville 
Zorzopulos, Ana Urbana 

Zuback, Christopher Bolingbrook 
Zuckert, Jay Palatine 
Zumwalt, Shelley Griggsville 
Gold, Neal Buffalo Grove 
Kink, Rudy Springfield 
Romasanta, Marcos Chicago 
Vootkur, Aparna Glendale Heights 
Palmer, Christian Biloxi, MS 



Graduates 



413 



H 



11 



19 



Eighteen thousand Americans and 350 Italian marines provided protection for the retreat of United Nations forces from 
Somalia. 

' '-.\ space shuttle Endeavor laimched into the night sky on a 15 1/2 day mission to study the far reaches of the universe. 

'vJongress got closer to demanding the Clinton Administration to move the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jemsalem. 
Critics of tne move warned of resulting diplomatic disaster in potentially angering Arab parties who wouldn't see U.S. posi- 
tion as unbiased, and thereby disrupting delicate Middle East peace process. 

New York Governor George E. Pataki signed a death penalty bill into law, making New York the 38th state with capital pun- 
ishment. 

Twelve people, including seven children, were killed, and 28 others injured, as a time bomb exploded outside a Shiite 
mosque in Pakistan, which somehow fanned anti-U.S. hatreds. 

The space shuttle Endeavor landed in California, ending the longest flight in shuttle history. Mexican President Ernesto 
Zedillo took economic measures to stabilize Mexico's failing economy, including a 50% sales tax increase. 



/\altonen. Jonathoft^,,.. -yj 


;,^ 


284 


Allen, Tennille 


.%3 


Armstrong, J. 


2S2 


Baldoza, Veramarie 


Abarbanel, Racbael 


^i^ 239 


363 


AllLson, E. 


244 


Armstrong, Katie 


246, 363 


Baldrich, Camille 


Abarnel, K.ichel 


^^B 


239 


Allord, Shane 


331, 363 


Arndt, Jason 


282, 327 


Baleiko, Ruth 


.^bbey, S 


1^H 


244 


Allswang, Jennifer 


239, 363 


Arndt, Jennifer 


363 


Bales, Josh 


Abbott, K.iiherine 


^^1 


326 


Almon, Ryan 


311, 363 


Arndt, S. 


246 


Ballard, S. 


Abbott, lony 


^^^L^ 


293 


Alon, Noam 


241 


Arnett, Stephanie 


363 


Ballsrud, Kathy 


Aboutar, Daniel 


li^P^ 282 


363 


Altenbaumer, Jodi 


248, 326, 363 


Arnold, Jeffrey 


363 


Bally, Emily 


Abrahamson, B 




253 


Althans, Tracey 


363 


Arnold, S. 


240, 275 


Baloun, Craig 


AbrahanL^on, K, 




253 


Althoff, Brian 


284 


Arnoldy, K. 


253 


Baloun, Jeff 


Abrams, Kate 




26 


Altom, Katherine 


363 


Arora, S. 


331 


Baloun, L. 


Abrams, Rob 




267 


Alton, T. 


266 


Arredondo. Beatriz 


363 


Bakes, Dan 


Abmzino, Kim 




130 


Alvarez, Yvonne E. 


249 


Arroyo, Ramiro 


285 


Bambule, Suzzanne 


Abukhdeir. Amani A. 




249 


Amann, C. 


240 


Arroyo, Richard 


292 


Bane, G. 


Abukhdeir. Hanadi 


249 


363 


Amato, Amy 


298, 313 


Arteaga, Ramon 


260 


Banerji, Ronald 


Abundis. Cecilia 




290 


Ambler, Mark 


242 


Arth, Aaron 


363 


Banks, Pamela A, 


Aceron, Suzanne 




363 


Amrein, Laura 


264 


Arthur, Scott 


363 


Banoff, Bonnie 


Achilles, Amber 




363 


Amin, A. 


291 


Aruldoss, D. 


266 


Baran, M, 


Achord, Shanna 




363 


Ammirati, Jim 


262 


Asaro, K. 


253 


Baranauskas, N. 


Achtien. Eric 




262 


Ander, Deborah 


257, 363 


Ashur, Tanya 


277 


Baranski, Nichole 


Acker, Courtney 


140 


325 


Anderson. Adam 


284 


Assmus, L. 


278 


Barch. J. 


Ackerman, Ian 




267 


Anderson, Andrea 


352 


Atkinson 


218 


Barclay, Steve 


Ackerman, M. 




278 


Anderson, Brian 


238, 280 


Atterberry, B. 


252 


Barengo, Beth 


Acosta, German A. 


285 


363 


Anderson, Bryan 


312 


Au, Connie 


363 


Baren. Mike 


Adair, Kristina 




363 


Anderson. Carrie 


363 


Au, Wing Yun 


363 


Barker, Christopher 


Adamo, J. 




236 


Anderson. Colton 


279 


Aude, Chri.stine 


363 


Barkley, Krista 


Adams, A. 




251 


Anderson. Dwight 


363 


Auer, L. 


253 


Barman. Julie 


Adams. Bill 




237 


Anderson. H. 


275 


Augspurger, Nathan 


237 


Barman. Sandy 


Adams, C. 




278 


Anderson, K. 


257, 278 


AugspLirger, Susan 


363 


Barnard, S. 


Adams, L. 




269 


Anderson, L. 


275 


Auguis, L. 


278 


Barnes, Doug 


Adams, Lisa 




363 


Anderson, Matt 


287 


Augustine, Joy 


243 


Barnes, Jeff 


Adams, Michelle 


255 


363 


Anderson, N. 


269 


Aultz, Jeremiah 


282 


Barnes. S. 


Adams, Naomi 




315 


Anderson, Tom 


261 


Aung-Myint, Terri 


271, 363 


Barnes. Sarah 


Adams, Suzzane 




33 


Andorfer, Heidi 


363 


Aupperle, Ryan 


237, 312 


Barney, Julie 


Adcock. H. 




266 


Andreas-Hobin, C. 


264 


Austgen, G. 


244 


Barnum. A. 


Adcock, M. 




266 


Andrejek, David 


363 


Austiff, C. 


266 


Barr, Aaron 


Addington, Jamie 




277 


Andrews, Scott 


276 


Austin, Bryce 


292 


Barr, S. 


Aden, Mindy 




363 


Angelica, Tom 


36 


Austin, N. 


240 


Barradas. Cesar 


Aden, Su.san 




363 


Angelino, J. 


250 


Aveyard, C. 


240 


Barrera. Maria 


Adier, Lawrence 




363 


Angle, T. 


291 


Avni. Tamar 


363 


Barrick, Rebecca 


Adsuar, Natalie 




363 


Angio, Melissa 


244, 349 


Awazu, Yahna 


290 


Barrientes, John 


Ae.schelman, H. 




275 


Angus, Jason 


363 


Axe, Kathleen 


243, 298, 332 


Barrington, Joshua 


Aggertt, Michelle 


255, 320 


363 


Anhari, Ali 


363 


Ayeroff. Jason 


282 


Barrios, K, 


Agre.st, Jeff 


300, 301 


363 


Aniello, Anthony 


• 277 


Ayers, J. 


275 


Barrios, L. 


Aguilar, Anni.s.sa 


290 


363 


Aningo, Welugewe 


363 


Ayers, Sarah 


363 


Barrow, Elisheva 


Ahmari. Susanne 




363 


Ankney, Jonathan 


363 


Ayura, K. 


251 


Barrow, Thalia 


Ahn, Eura 




363 


Annafi, Ere 


299 


Ayyagari, Simil 


241 


Barry. Dan 


Ahn, Jin Byung 




42 


Annicchiarico, Simon 


42 






Barry. Larry 


Ahrling, J, 


269 


iil 


Annis, Aaron 


363 






Barstad. Kelda 


Aitken, Christine 


244 


363 


Anspach, A. 


246. 348 






Barta. David 


Akinkunle, Adedej 




352 


Antagnoli, Tony 


262 


Babiarz, M. -^^ 


r 240 


Bartels. Sandy 


Alberici, Jennifer 




252 


Antal, Amber 


363 


Babski, L:)ianne ^m 


363 


Bartelt. Allison 


Albers, Ronnie 




238 


Antonelli, A. 


294 


Bacevich, Beth ^W 


243 


Banelt. Chris 


Albers, Tom 




332 


Antonini, J. 


278 


Backus, Neil ^W^ 


-^ 364 


Banh, Mike 


Alberts, L. 




278 


Antonopoulos, George 


260, 363 


Badrov, Jo.seph ^^T^ 


^ 364 


Bartholomew, Craig 


Albcrtson, Mary 




253 


Apo.stolopoulos, M. 


246 


Badruddoja. Roksana 


M 364 


Bartimas. Da\id 


Albin. N, 


266 


331 


Appenzeiler, 1. 


253 


Bae, Herni.in 


^W 147 


Bartkowicz, A. 


Albrecht, Luke 




306 


April, Jen 


239 


Bahadur, O. _ ^ 


^ 269 


Bartlett. Ken 


Albright. Angela 




363 


Aquino, Shawn 


291 


Bahng, K, ^L— ^^ 


331 


Bartlow. A, 


Albright, Heather 




363 


Arana, B. 


278 


Baier, Kara 


331. 338 


Bartlow, Aaron 


Alex, Mina 




252 


Aranda, Aldo 


293 


Bailey, Brent 


282 


Bartm.in. C 


Alex, V, 




252 


Aranda, Rogelio 


306, 326, 363 


Bailey, James 


364 


Banoli, Jamie 


Alexander, Joe 




170 


Arciga, Monica L. 


249 


Bailey, M. 


240 


Banolic, N, 


Alexander, Liz 




239 


Aremu. Oyebisi 


363 


Bailis. David 


364 


Bartusch, Jeremy 


Alij), D, 




291 


Arenas. Hilda 


25,70 


Bailitz, O, 


250 


Basboom, l.\le 


Alip, .M 




291 


Arenberg, DavitI 


298 


Bair, C. 


250 


B.isch, Bri.m 


Alitto, Henry 


291 


352 


Arendarczyk. Jennifer 


302, 305 


Baker, Brent 


238 


Bashaw . Jennifer 


Allaman, Ixjri 


11, 255, 312 


363 


Arends, Carrie 


248, 363 


Baker. Biyan 


242 


Ba.s,s, Kevin 


Allaman, Robbie 




2.3H 


Argac), Michael 


363 


Baker, Doug 


73 


Ba.ss. Lariy 


Allen, J 




252 


Argraves, James 


363 


Baker. Seth 


237 


Bass, lee 


Allen, Jason 




363 


Argucta, O.scar 


285 


Bala, A. 


240 


B.iss, .Samlie 


Allen. K. 




240 


Arling, Adam 


293 


B.il.i. H K 


241 


Bassler, Ky.m 


Allen, Richard 




.563 


Annentrout. [, 


255 


li.ildiiei, 1 


240 


Basil, .\nup.mi 



264. 



414 



Index 



'hellor, Lisa 
■. :hellor, Susan 
i.'S, Derrick 

jsta, Tatiana 

a, Raj 

en. B. 

!er, Michelle 

jer, Ronald 

er. Steven 

ghman, M. 

man, L. 

mann, John 

mer, Greg 

mgarther, Ashley 

mgartner. Wade 

sell, H. 

spies, Jeff 

tista, Jeremy 

a, A. 

DUgian, Erin 

:hler, Craig 

rd, Ed 

■e, Nick 

y, Matt 

iley, Lelah 

stall, M. 

jpre, B. 

avior, Suzanne 

a, K. 

itel, David 

cberger. Amy 

car, Daniel 

cer, S. 

taring, K. 

ces, Dan 

kett, Kelly 

cman, Craig 

cinan, Daniel 

cman, E. 

cman, S. 

erka, Brian 

nar, Ron 

narz, K. 

zk, Jindalle 

don, Dan 

5un, Denise 

iar, Scott 

or, Alison 

, Kian Teik 
<ling, Ryan 
mkt'. Adam D. 

I limothy 

, Havid 



. \l 

«nonte, Teresa 
<on, B. 
u .11 , Zach 

r.iiiic, Jennifer Lynn 
Adena 
^haron 
<,ding, B. 
<edict, C, 
(edict, L. 
<ies, Brian 
<ing. Jill 
<nett, John 
cnett, Karen 
• nil Michael 



278 
278 

260, 364 
364 
293 
252 
239 
364 
364 
263 
253 
211 
76 
70 
237 
244 
364 
364 
257 

243, 342 

290 

218 

42 

210 

249, 338 
252 
275 
326 
240 
282 
364 
364 
246 
250 
260 
364 
364 
364 
264 
278 
292 
282 
278 
276 
293 

240, 364 
364 
298 
364 
339 
281 
364 
292 
331 
364 

324, 364 
349 
264 
364 
251 
283 

246, 364 
239 
338 
244 
244 
244 
364 
18 
299 
364 

292, 327 




Peter Mackay 



Tiffany Cull and Nathan Hood 



Benson, A. 
Benson, Amanda 
Benson, Richard 
Benz, Julie 
Beran, Laura 
Berarde, M. 
Berens, Steven 
Berg, Adam 
Berg, K, 
Berg, Kristen 
Berg, Kristi 
Berger, Kathy 
Berger, Maria 



206 


Berger, Reed 


342, 364 


Berk, Dana 


287 


Berk, Jaime 


79, 335 


Berlin, Amy 


364 


Berman, C. 


278 


Bernard, Jeremy 


364 


Bernard, Tehra 


241 


Berning, B. 


294 


Bernosky. Greg 


327 


Bernotus, Nicole 


364 


Bernstein, Amy 


239 


Bernstein, Karen 


364 


Bern.stein, Stephen 



239, 342, 364 

239, 342, 364 

239, 331 

239 

348 

241 

364 

294 

279 

364 

252, 326 

239 

364 



Berqui.^l, Brian 
Berrera, Maria 
Berry, Meredith 
Berry, Shellean 
Bersche, Joel 
Bertoglio, Kathryn 
Beshilas, Sofia 
Bessette, Andrew P, 
Bessick, L. 
Beth. Kevin W. 
Betts, Julie 
Betz, R. 
Beu, N, 
Beverly, Matt 
Beyers, Ben 
Bezman, Michelle 
Bezzini, Graig 
Bhanpuri, A. 
Bhattacharvya, Rumi 
Biag, Jonathan 
Biagini, Lori 
Bialecki, Jim 
Biancalana, C. 
Biancalana, Elisa 
Bianchi, Gail 
Bianchi, Jeannie 
Bickelhaupt, J. 
Biehl. Becky 
Bierman, K. 
Biewenga, Michael 
Bilder. Laura 
Bilotta, Brad 
Bils, Brett 
Bingman, Chad 
Biondo, B, 
Birch, Jeffrey 
Birnbaum, A. 
Birnbaimi, Keith 
Bischmann, B, 
Bischoff, Catherine 
Bischoff, K. 
Bishop, C, 
Bishop, D, 
Bishop, E, 
Bishop, Mike 
Bishop, S. 
Bissell, Kevin 
Bitakis, Steve 
Bitkiewicz, A. 
Bittner, Bart 
Bittner, K. 
Bityou. Lazar 
Bjerkan, A, 
Black. Darci 
Black, Tommy 
Blacker. Travis 
Blackman, Ken 
Blain, Brady 
Blair, Eric 
Blair. Jonathan 
Blakemore, Sharon 
Bland, J. 
Blazier, Jason 
Blecker. Phillip A. 
Blevins, Matt 
Blickem, Melissa 
Blinn, T, 
Bloch, R. 
Block, Nicholas 
Bloemker, K, 
Blood, Susan 
Blouin. J. 



241 
23 
364 
248 
260 
364 

253, 364 
284 
252 
284 
364 
240 
251 
290 
211 
239 
85 
331 
364 
364 
364 
241 
278 
72, 240, 364 

239, 338 
338 
255 

220, 221 
294 
365 

257, 365 
267 
365 
238 
278 
365 
253 
365 
349 
365 
255 
278 
244 
264 
289 

264, 348 

260, 365 
282 
251 
308 
294 
290 
244 

277, 365 
299 
365 
156 
215 
260 
365 
365 
251 
282 
281 
262 
36 
236 
246 
365 
269 
365 
349 



II 
\ 

II 



20 In Japan, a deliberate nerve gas attack is inflicted on innocent Tokyo subway commuters, killing ten people and injuring 
more than 500, many of them critically. 

21 Conservative commentator Patrick J. Buchanan declared that he was running as a Republican Presidential nominee. 

25 A CIA official was reassigned in the furor over the agency's employment of a Guatemalan colonel linked to the deaths of an 
American innkeeper ancia Guatemalan guerrilla, 

29 The world's largest bank was created by the merger of two of Japan's most powerful financial institutions, the Bank of Tokyo 
and the Mitsubishi Bank, totaling $819 Dillion in assets. 

31 Federal Judge Eugene H. Nickerson struck down the military's policy on homosexuals on the grounds that it violated the 
First and Firth Amendments and catered to the fears and prejudices of heterosexual troops. 



Index 



415 



I 



4 



R 
I 
L 



12 



18 



Secretary of State Warren Christopher recommended that the United States l^an most trade with Iran. Judge Sonia Stomayor ol 
the U.S. District Court in Manhattan issued an injunction against major league baseball owners yesterday. This ended the 
eight month baseball strike since Aug. 12, 1995. 

The 50th anniversary of World War Us end sparked heated debate in Germany. Republican governors worked with Congress 
negotiate changes in Medicaid that would limit rising costs of the program and increase the states' power over it. 

iT>c Pentagon sent the U.S. embassy in Haiti a list of political foes of President Aristide who were believed to be selected for 
assassination. After a week of debates the U.S. Senate approved cuts of $16 billion in government spending in the current fis- 
cal year. In the process, hundreds of millions of dollars was shifted back to welfare. 

The U.S. dollar recovered from its record post-World War II level, initiating bitter arguments between Japan and Germany as 
lo vv'ho bore the responsibility for fixing a problem that threatened economic relationships around the world. 

The CIA asked Congress for $19 million in 1996 to continue covert operations to destabilize Iraq, and to curb their "expan- 
sionist ambitions." 

The United Nations' four-week conference to review and renew The Treaty on The Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons 
began. The United States failed to persuade China to end its nuclear cooperation with Iran, or to improve its human rights 
performance. 



k 



Blue, J. 

Bluestone, David 
Blume. D. 
Blumenberg, Karia 
Boak, Derek 
Bobe, J. 
Bobis. Jeff 
Bobyk, Bkiir 
Boccarossa, Jim 
Bode. Chri.stoplier 
Bodene, N. 
Bodine. William 
Boe, Tracy 
Boehler, Nicole 
Boehm, Carrie 
Boehm, N. 
Boeke, T, 
Boens, G. 
Boerma, Tim 
Bogelsany, J, 
Bogoslaw, Debbie 
Bohle, J, 
Boian, Theresa 
Bokamba. N.sengela 
Bokowy, Thomass 
Boldt, Jeff 
Bollinger. Jacque 
Bolos, Dee 
Bolton. Janis 
Boltz, Dave 
Bond. Jaime 
Bonino, M. 
Bonner, Rebecca 
Bonovich, Earl 
Bonsignore. Fenna Lee 
Bonus, Debbie 
Booker, Paige 
Booth, Brett 
Bopp, Steve 
Borak, Rachel 
Borbas, Chris 
Bordner, Heather 
Bordy, J. 
Borger, David 
Boricic, Lisa 
Bornkamp, Amy 
Borow. Martha 
Borske, Erin 
Borucki. Jason 
Bo.ston, J. 
Bosworth, P. 
Botica, J. 
Bottom. Michael 
Boudeman. Matt 
Boudreau. Philip 
Bouillon, Shelly 
Boule, Melvin 
Boulware, Christina 
Bounds, Jennifer 
Bourdreaux, L. 
Bowers, E, 
Bowers. Eli.se 
Bowers, Jcs.sica 
Bowman, Aaron 
Bown, Krica 
Boyd, Brian 
Boyd, Joe 
Boyda, Maureen 
Boydo, Adam 
Boyks, I) 
Boza, Todd 
Bracki, Michael 



294 
365 
252 

299, 365 
365 
278 
316 

241, 349 
262 
365 
266 
283, 312, 342, 365 
255, 312, 365 
365 
332 
349 
331 
246 
284 
257 
239 
255 

271, 365 
365 
365 
238 
310 
239 
209 
261 
365 
252 
332 
365 

175, 365 
248 
365 
365 
372 

285, 365 
292 
365 
331 
365 
365 
332 
290 

164, 165 
291 
278 
251 
246 
365 
237 
365 
310 
365 
365 
365 
246 
253 

253, 365 
365 
287 

342, 365 
293 
293 
365 
291 
252 
114 
365 



Bradshav\-, Todd 
Brady. Heidi 
Braid, Amanda 
Brakenridge, Scott 
Brame, Sharon 
Brammeier, Nate 
Brandi, Becky 
Brandt, Betsy 
Brandt, C, 
Brandt, Katie 
Branham, Clyde 
Branham, Jon 
Branham, Sheila 



284 


Brannstrom, Megan 


146 


Branoni. Matthew 


294, 338 


Brasel, Ste\.in 


242 


Brashear, G. 


365 


Braun. Jennie 


279 


Braverman, A. 


252 


Bra\'erman, Amy 


4l 


Bravieri. |. 


257 


Breda, K. 


338 


Breen, H. 


365 


Breen, lustin 


280 


Brehart. D. 


365 


Breidel, Kinibedv 



257, 365 
273, 365 
282 
255 
243 
348 
239 
240 
246 
240 
282 
275 
365 




I'clcr M.KkcN 



Craig Anderson 



Breit.stein. R. 
Brennan, B, 
Brennan. Brian 
Brennan. Emma 
Brenner, Ann 
Bresnick, Benjamin 
BrestVanKampen, K. 
Bretthauer, Scott 
Brewer, Careyana 
Brewer, Douglas J. 
Brewer, Jenny 
Brey, Angela 
Brickley, Amy 
Bridges, Glynnis 
Bridgewater, Jim 
Briggs, H. 
Briggs, James 
Bright, K. 
Brill. Janine 
Brimner, Travis T. 
Brinkman. N. 
Britter. Torya 
Britton. Andy 
Britton. Boug 
Brochman. N. 
Brockman, Renee 
Brodie. Darrin 
Brody, John 
Broms. Michael 
Brook. Karen 
Brooks, R. 
Brooks, Sarah 
Brooks, Tanya 
Broquard. Wesley 
Brotherton. E. 
Brotschul. Martin 
Brown, A. 
Brown. Adam 
Brown. B. 
Brown, C. 
Brown. Colleen A.. 
Brown, D. T. 
Brown. Dean 
Brown, Derek 
Brown. Eric 
Brown. Greg 
Brown, Heather 
Brown. J. 
Brown, Jeffrey 
Brown. Joel 
Brown. Kelly 
Brown, L. 
Brov\-n. Ijwrence 
Brown, l.insey 
Brown. l.\nn 
Brown. Man- 
Brown. Pamela J. 
Brown, Pamela J. 
Brown. Pamela J. 
Browi-i, Rebecca 
Brown, Rob 
Brow n. S. 
Brown. Su.san 
Browiiell. Kevin 
Urow in-ll, lis.i 
Urounmg. lXi\ kI L. 
Brub.iker. Jim 
Bruce. Ian 
Bruce. J Jacob 
Bnuh, A 
Bruch, Kexiti 
Hiuck. G. 



264, 



416 



Index 



ick, G. 






240 


Bye, Suzanne 




327 


366 


Carolan, Shawn 




366 


Chantome, Becky 




144 


! le, C. 






257 


Byers, L. 






246 


Caroline, Jolynn 




321 


Chaparro, Madeline 




370 


1 leggeman, Jeff 






267 


Byers, Lynn 






366 


Carosielli, BCristen 




366 


Chapman, Courtney 




275, 370 


I'lmm. Michael 




55 


, 366 


Bykowski, L. 






257 


Carpenter, J, 




331 


Chapman, H. 




264, 348 


Eimund, K. 






349 


Byrne, Chrkstopher 






366 


Carr, Jamie 


68, 69 


Chapman, Karyn 




370 


Finette, Annie 






366 


Byrne, Colin John 






366 


Carr, Jason 




332 


Chapman, N. 




244 


,11-, F, 






278 


Byrnes, T, Patrick 




293 


366 


Carr, Maria 




32 


Chapman, William 




370 


lins, 1', 






291 


Byron, Steve 






262 


Carrasco, Aimee 




253 


Chapnick, Stephanie 




370 


rm.son, Scott 






276 










Carrigan, K. 




255 


Chappell, J. 




251 


Pisca, Eric 






366 










Carrillo, I, 




251 


Chariya, Thananaun 




281 


B,-.li. R. 






246 










Carroll, Chris 




242 


Chase, J, 




257, 294 


Rss. Joanna 
Eani. Christian 






332 


Cabage, Michael J. 






284 


Carroll, David 




366 


Chase, Jennifer 




370 






181 


Cabalfin, C. ^^g 


^^KK 




252 


Carsello, Jeffrey M. 


331 


366 


Chase, S, 




252, 298, 348 


fter, John 






287 


Cable, Dave ^^^k 


^^^^ 


218 


219 


Carson, Adam 




366 


Chavez, Melissa 




370 


Bin. joselle 






366 


Cabrales, l-sl^^SSm 






290 


Carson, Jeremy 




366 


Chavez, P. 




257 


Ehanan, N. 






257 


Cabrales, Juan 






241 


Cartenter, S. 




240 


Chears, Florence 




370 


iLhnian, E. 






348 


Cabrera, L, s 


^^^^^ 


k 


263 


Carter, Andre 




11 


Cheline, L. 




266 


I:l<, lames 






366 


Cacini, Mike limBB 


HUP' 


1^ 


242 


Carter, J, 




250 


Chen, Evan 




370 


fcken, K. 






252 


Cada, Mary ^^^W 


^^^^^ 




366 


Carter, Jennifer 




276 


Chen, Michael 




370 


jLklar, John 






242 


Cafaro, Brian 






366 


Carter, Josh M, 




242 


Chen, Michelle 




300, 321, 370 


ikley, Brian 






262 


Cafferty, Michael 






366 


Carter, Keri 


271 


366 


Chen, Miles 




370 


fe:kley, Mark 






327 


Cagwood, A. 






264 


Carter, Natalie 




366 


Cheng, Chris 




261 


M.knian, Christina 




366 


Cahill, Brian 




237 


366 


Cartlidge, Jennifer 




310 


Cheng, E, 




251 


tide, Matthew 




65 


366 


Cahill, Sara 




302 


304 


Carucci, Chris 




366 


Cheng, Wenlan 




367 


Fiizinski, Ted 






366 


Cain, Grant 






280 


Caruso, A. 




294 


Cherny, J. 




244 


E;dek, T. 






348 


Calabrese, T, 






263 


Caruthers, Jill 




366 


Chesley, G. 




269 


E,-del, Michael 




241 


366 


Calderon, Rudy 






262 


Casaclang, Cornelio 




34 


Chesniak, Kevin 




370 


EL-del. T, 






275 


Caldwell, J, 






257 


Casaclang, Rowena 




366 


Chesta, Julie 




370 


E-scher, J, 






269 


Calhoun, J. 






266 


Casey, George 




263 


Cheung, Kenny 




327 


E.",singer, J. 






246 


Caliendo, L, 






246 


Casey, J. 




253 


Cheung, V. 




263 


l;singer, Michelle 




366 


Calkins, M, 






349 


Cash, C. 




275 


Chiarito, Jenny 




32 


1- T, 






253 


Calvert, Andrew 




137 


241 


Cashman, Andrew 




242 


Chidley, K. 




253 


^Jl^ki, Stacy 






366 


Camara, Natalie 






271 


Casner, Joy 


243 


366 


Chin, Doris 




370 


lliriiw, AUyn 






283 


Cameron, Amy 






276 


Casolari, J, 




269 


Chin, E. 




246 


[Ikisky. A. 






278 


Cameron, James R, 






284 


Casper, Steve 




293 


Chin, Richard 




370 


tllerman, Alison 






366 


Cameron, Jerry 






287 


Cassens, B. 




291 


Chin, Yvonne 




370 


lllitt, Brian 






366 


Camp, Jay 






290 


Casseriy, Deirdre 




366 


Chinn, S, 




269 


Endt, A. 






269 


Campagna, Jozel 




79 


335 


Castellli, J. 




264 


Chinn, Stacey 




316 


Enselnieyer, A. 




255, 298 


348 


Campagna, Mary 






366 


Castelloni, Carol 


327 


366 


Chivington, K. 




257 


Ente, A, 






275 


Campanelli, Gino 






293 


Castens, Kyle 




366 


Choi, G. 




253 


Erch, Bruce 






366 


Campbell, Ed 






293 


Castillo, Kristina 




302 


Chou, Helen 




271 


Erger. Darcy 






175 


Campbell, Erin 






366 


Catlett, S. 




331 


Chou, Jeffery 




242 


Ergeson, Marnie 






366 


Camper, Sarah 






252 


Caughey, Ben 




261 


Chou, Peter 




370 


Erke, Brigid 






24 


Campion, A. 






331 


Caughey, Christy 




243 


Chou, Shih Shin 




370 


Erke, E. 






331 


Campus, Brian 






366 


Cavanaugh, Amy 




366 


Chow, Ellen 




370 


Erketi. Aspen 






212 


Canfield, K. 






294 


Cavers, Josie 




366 


Chowanec, M. 




253 


Erkhaker, Jeffrey 






366 


Canfield, Whitney 






366 


Cavey, J, 




244 


Christensen, Colleen 




302, 304 


lk^ John 






282 


Canna, J, 






257 


Cazan, D, 




253 


Christensen, Dallon 




316 


iilriii, William 






242 


Cantor, Amy 






285 


Cele, Priya 




313 


Christian, Mark 




291 


li-k-,son, Patty 






300 


Cantu, Manuel 






281 


Ceriale, A, 




240 


Christmon, Chariya 




334 


Imian, Dawn 






366 


Cantwell, C. 






264 


Cerny, A. 




294 


Chu, Beverly 




370 


Irnett, L. 






349 


Capes, Jennifer 






366 


Cerny, L, 




252 


Chu, Wesley 




334 


Irnett, Peggie 




299, 326 


366 


Capouch, Heather 






285 


Cervantes, Josefina 




366 


Chung, E. 




349 


Irns, A. 






264 


Caprio, Kellie 




246 


366 


Cetera, Mike 


300, 301, 336 


337 


Chung, Joanne 




338 


[rns, Kathy 






366 


Caravia, Lori 




79 


335 


Cha, Chung 




366 


Chutipisalkul, M, 




269 


Irns, Stacey 






366 


Carey, J, 






294 


Chakravorty, Bonnie 




326 


Cibula, E, 




264 


Irns, Walters. 






284 


Cargill, Dan 




332 


366 


Chalke, Stephen 




366 


Ciesla, Donna 




252 


[m.-itine, M, 






250 


Carl, Kimberly 






366 


Challacombe, Wade 




280 


Cieslak, Jennifer 




246, 321 


Irrell, Diane 






243 


Cariborg, A. 






244 


Challos, Courtney 


300 


301 


Cimaroli, Edward 




370 


Isboom, Jason 






280 


Carlson, B. 






348 


Chamberlain, Eric 




325 


Cirrincione, Julie 




10, 266 


1 ibi iom, Joel 






280 


Carison, Becky 






243 


Chambers, L. 




252 


Claps, N. 




240 


-tn Kelly 






276 


Carlson, Brian 




284 


366 


Chambers. Lana 




366 


Clark, A. 




278 


^L.^ln<), E. 






246 


Carlson, Caroline 






326 


Chambers, Laura 




347 


Clark, Jr Charies N. 




370 


I sen, S. 






246 


Carlson, L, 






252 


Chamcharas, Jamarie 




370 


Clark, Mike 




279 


Ivsone. RJ, 




327 


366 


Carlson, Quinn 






242 


Champion, B, 




255 


Clarke, A. 




253 


Itilla, Shanna 






117 


Carison, T, 






252 


Chan, Julie 


271 


370 


Clarke, Sunne 




370 


tkis, Josh 






242 


Carlson, Teri 






311 


Chandrathil, Anita 




370 


Clausius, ICristin 




370 


ik-i ;\lison 






366 


Carlton, Karyn 






31 


Chanenson, Genna 




239 


Clay, Andy 




310 


iicM (ich, Mark 






242 


Carinichael, Craig 






242 


Chang, Cecilia 


324 


325 


Clayton, S, 




253 


ii.s, .\nne 






253 


Carmichael, Jennifer 






252 


Chang, J, 




275 


Cleary, Maureen 




370 


Itis, K. 






278 


Carmody, Matt 






280 


Chang, T, 




331 


Cleary, P. 




331 


zzelli, Jodi 
1 A A A A 


A A t 


A A A A 


366 


Carnevale, K, 




^ m 


257 


Chang, Wendy 




370 


Clemens, S, 


A A 


251 


1 V V V w 


A car 


■ V V V ^ 

bomb attack 


in Oklahoma City ripped throu 


eh the Alfred P. Murrah building, killing a 


V 9 w w w V 

' least 31 people. 


Many 


Others 


:> 


were 


buried in 


the 


wreckage. Presiaent Clinton convened an inter-agency task force and^called on Aiiiericans to pry for the 


dead and stricken. 


He also dispatched 


a small 


army of federal investigators 


to conduct an intensive hunt for those 


responsi- 


* 26 


ble in the terrorist 


attack. 




















Brothers James D. 


Nichols, an organic 


farmer 


n Decker, 


Mich., and Terry Nichols were helc 


on conspiracy c 


harges 


to the 


I 


Oklahoma City 


bombing. The latter built "bottle bombs" 


and experimented 


with othei 


explosives in 1993 and 1994 with 


accused bomb 


ng suspect Timothy J. McVeigh 


















L 





























Index 



417 



A 
Y 



iU 



12 



President Clinton said he would cut off all U.S. trade and investments with Iran in an effort to fight terrorism and the spread 
of nuclear technology. After a four year custody battle over Baby Richard, the Illinois Supreme Court awarded biological par- 
ents Otakar and Daniela Kirchner custody. The boy was taken sobbing and whimpering from his adoptive parents of 
Schaumbure, 111. The lengthy legal fight involved the Governor, the General Assembly and judges in tne U.S. Supreme Court. 
.\ crowd of approximately 300 watched as Richard was taken away. 

■"' e Croatian Army stormed across U.N. cease-fire lines into an enclave held by rebel Serbs, raising the possibility of a return 

: ' luli-scale war. 

I lie Clinton Administration ended 35 years of special treatment for Cuban refugees and said it would start returning boat M 
people after admitting a group being held at Guantanamo. f 

International teams of scientists were sent to Zaire to investigate the outbreak of a mysterious disease that had killed at least 
56 people and put another 100 in hospitals in the last month. 

More than 170 countries at the U.N. conference agreed to extend in perpetuity a treaty that had limited the spread of nuclear 
weapons for a quarter of a century. 



^ 



Clendenin, Katherine 
Clever, Aymee 
Cliff, H. 
Clince, Sean 
Cloney. Jennifer 
Clough, Brenden 
Clough. H. 
Clough, I. 
Clow, K. 
Clumpner, Stacie 
Coba, C. 
Cobb, John 
Cobb. Stephen 
Cobo. F. 
Cochran. C, 
Cochran, Christine 
Cochran, Tim 
Cochrane, Scott 
Cody. E. 
Coffman, A, 
Coglianese, Don 
Cohee. Amy 
Cohen. Brandi 
Cohen. Erica 
Cohen, IVIelissa 
Cohen, Ornit 
Cohen, Valerie 
Colan. Andy 
Colba. Christi 
Colby, Kimberly 
Colby, Shane 
Cole, Annette 
Coleman, Jennifer 
Coleman, Jeremy 
Coleman, Kevin 
Coleman, Mary 
Collins, C. 
Collins, Jennifer 
Collins, K. 
Collins. Kathleen 
Collins. M. 
Collins, Michelle 
Colwell. Dorothea 
Combe, Emily 
Conklin, Tom 
Connell, Christy 
Connell, D. 
Conner. Latoya 
Conners. Jim 
Conniff, .Mike 
Connor, Catherine 
Connor, E 
Cook, A. 
Cook, Angela 
Cook, Dave 
Cook, David 
Cook, J. 
Cook. M 
Cook. Shelly 
C;ookis, Judith 
(;ooley. Heather 
(iope, Bnice 
( Copper, 1' 
Corbetl. I! 
(;orbeli, (^armcl 
(>)r(()ran, Debra 
Cornerio, Tommy 
(.orrouxh. Kill 
Corry, Brian 
Corry, M. 
(.orsaw, Mindy 
Conez. Ana 



253, 370 
276 
275 
334 

257, 370 
241 
294 
294 
257 
323 
294 
262 
310 
331 
246 
370 
242 
50 
275 
278 
72 
370 
239 
239 
239 
370 

285, 370 

237 

13 

370 

242 

255, 298 
239 
280 
290 
164 
278 
370 
244 
370 

244, 291 
300, 301, 370 
370 
271 
283 
243 
250 

334, 370 
290 
280 
120 
257 
264 
370 
263 
370 
266 
278 

266, 370 

240, 370 
370 
241 
291 
255 

212, 213 
370 
267 
33 
290 
253 
370 
290 



Cosman, Rebecca 
Costa, K. 
Costa, L. 
Costianis, R. 
Cote, K. 
Comer, Richard 
Cottom, Christy 
Cottrell, Bill 
Coultas, Matthew 
Courier, Alice 
Courtney II, Jerry 
Coutant, J. 
Couturiaux, Darin 



370 


Cowell, Andrea 


246 


Cowles, Jason 


240 


Cox, Andrew 


252 


Cox, B. 


278 


Cox, J. 


,370 


Cox, Jen 


252 


Cox, Jennifer 


262 


Cox, K. 


370 


Cox, M. 


370 


Cox, S. 


370 


Coy, L. 


264 


Coy, Laura 


370 


Craig, Christine 



316, 342, 




348 


Craig, Maureen 


78, 79, 335 


293 


Cram, B. 


269 


276 


Cramer, J. 


269 


250 


Craven, Danielle 


243, 331 


275 


Crawford, C. 


250, 252, 349 


271 


Crawford, Carrie 


370 


370 


Crawford, Chris 


242, 313, 342 


278 


Crawford, M. 


257 


291 


Crawford, N. 


236 


264 


Crawford, R, 


349 


349 


Crawford, Stacy 


370 


23 


Creech, John 


370 


276 


Crews, C. 


252 




Criner, Tandy 


327 




Cristobal, Malou 
Croegaert, J. 


299, 370 




255 




Croegaert, Jan 


308 




Croenenbroeck, Tracy Van 


271 




Croft, Eric 


283, 370 




Crossan, Leslie 


243 




Crowe, Erin 


370 




Caiitt, J, 


264 




Crusius, J. 


294 




Crutcher, S. 


257 




Cruz, Mundo 


273 




Cuchra, Craig 


370 




Cull, Ian 


280, 370 




Cull, T 


253 




Cullerton, Dan 


241 




Cullinan, Corey 


176 




Cullinan, Patrick 


371 




Culumber, Andrea 


325 




Cummings, Joseph 


371 




Cunningham, Bridget 


243, 371 




Cunningham, C. 


252 




Cunningham, Gregg 


289 




Cunningham, Stacey 


371 




Cupec, Kathy 


ll.-« 




Curran, Meghan 


338, 3'^l 




Curran, Steven 


289, 300, 371 




Currey, Steven 


242 




Curtis, Amanda 


371 




Curtis. M. 


253 




Cuailewski, J. 


349 




Gushing, Matt 


160 




Cuvala, Michelle 


371 




Cwiklinski, Joe 


352 




Czaczoski, E. 


244 




Czalkowski, B. 


264 




Czarnik, Cyndi 


320 




Czarnoski, Chris 


279 




Czech, Nicole 


209. 240 




D'Arco. R. ^i^ 


^ 251 




D'Ercola, Jason 


■ 




Dabler, Vicky ^^^^^^^ 


■ 271. 371 




Dacroih, l^^^^^^^^^ 


■ 




D.ihlin, J4^^ 


■ 316 




l>.ihl>lulSt,'C 


■ 294 




1 ).ililquist, liLiv'e 


■ 




i).iil\ Hett^L 


H)R. 352. 371 




I c ll!^^^^^^^^ 


^^. 




D.ilc, .shcni ^^^^^^^ 


^^^ .^71 




Oak-v, Jenny 


243 




Daley, M.itt 


293 




Dales, I'.it 


293 




Dalke, 1, 


278 




Daly. M. 


269 




Damashek, Amy 


.<71 




n.iincii, .\nn,i 


2^1 



418 



INDEX 




Catch The Spirit! You're smart, you're gutsy, 
and you've got the credentials to take you to 
the top. Now you're looking for a career with 
challenge and a company that values what 
you have to offer. At MCI, we know all about 
challenge - and all about succeeding where 
others have not dared to go. We also know it 
will take bright, educated, hard- 
working and aggressive people to 
stay on the leading edge of this 
competitive industry into the 21st 



e 1993. MCI. 




century. As a worldwide leader in telecom- 
munications, we're no longer the new kid 
on the block. But we still embrace that 
entrepreneurial spirit. We're breaking new 
ground every day, creating exciting career 
opportunities in telecommunications, 
engineering, computer sciences, finance, 

marketing, and business. Ask 
your Placement Officer today 
about opportunities with MCI. An 
Equal Opportunity Employer. 



Advertisements 



419 




CongratiMonsjouVe made your dream come taie. 



After cdl the late nighLs ;md early 
mornings, ;md all the parties skipped because 
of iuiatomy, biochemistr)' mid pharmacology 
fincds, you're going to be a veterinarian. 
Before your new ch^illenges begin, pause a 
while to revel in your -.ichievement. 

When you do set out in practice, keep 
in mind that Ptlzer will h^ there for you ever\' 
step of the way. With animal health products 
that meet the needs of tockiv's veterinari:ui. 



Backed by smiles force cind technical service 
assistance, product usage upd^ites and client 
meeting materials that add v:ilue to the service 
you provide. 

So even if your "Yorkshire diiles" ^ire in 
Albuquerque, New Mexico, or Clinton, New 
York, Pfizer will help you write one success 



story after another. 
(J2^B Animal Health 



<Q> 



Ml < iriilinvs dmil mill Siiuill (,ii|)\rinhl ' l')'2 b\ |,llm•^ llfrnol (.dmt illiMr.iliiin b\ I)(iii .Siimts I scil \miIi pcrnii.sMon (iI .Si \l.irlin\ I'ros, Iiu , 
New Vnrk. N>. and Baiuain liooks liu \c« York, NY (£31W1 PIiat Iih 



420 



Advertisements 




Paul Grano 

Daniel Lee, Nerissa Bettran, Genevieve Noble, John Kitn, Kathyjii and 
Walter Punsapy 



bnalewich, Jim 




52.-i 


Davis, C 


2-14 


Uellann, L, 


27t 


Ueopere, Denise 


371 


ancey, len 




371 


Davis, Christine 


371 


Deian, Camelia 


327 


Derango, Erin 


243 


aniel. Lyndsey 




276 


Davis, Dwayne 


352 


Dekker. Amy 


371 


Derat. Aida 


249 


aniels. Michael 




371 


Davis. Guy 


334 


Dekoj. M, 


275 


Derdzinski. Sue Ellen 


252 


■aiiko. Christine 




243 


Davis. Jeff 


237 


Del Real. Jose 


371 


Dertley. A. 


246 


ankoski. Eric 


290 


371 


Davis, Rebecca 


371 


Delanney, Sylvie 


130 


Derue. Steve 


.352 


bnnenfelt, Michael 




287 


Davis. S. 


278 


Delapena, L. 


269 


Desai. R. 


.331 


anner, Phyllis 


110 


111 


Davis, Susan 


l47 


DelaTorre, Dawn 


266. 371 


Desai. Shefali 


133 


are, Michael 


238 


312 


Davis. Tracy 


71 


Delaunois, Dan 


292 


Desmond, B. 


246 


arling. Ginger 
.irrow. Michelle 




371 


Dawson, Brian 


299 


DeLeon, Bridgette 


271, 402 


Dessert, Melissa 


18 


73 


246 


Dawson, Justin 


371 


DeLeonardis, Mike 


280 


Dettro, Doyle 


283 


arwish, Diane 




310 


Dayon, J. 


349 


Delfin, Jay 


280 


Dettrok, E. 


294 


as, M. 




294 


De Los Santos, Sandra 


371 


Delgadillo, Elvia 


371 


Deut.schmann. K. 


266 


as, Nirvan 




371 


Deanching. Reginald 


371 


Delheimer, Dristi 


277 


DeVar, Marc 


263, 309 


as, Shoma 




327 


Deans, Rodessa 


371 


Delheimer, Kristi 


371 


DeVar. William 


371 


aSilva, Assir 




371 


Debatin, L. 


331 


Delia, S. 


244 


Deverman. Brian 


283 


ass. Deepak 




55 


Debatin, Lyn 


243, 342. 371 


Delmore, A. 


278 


Devore. Chris 


214 


asse, Chris 




241 


Debruler, C. 


294 


DeMello, K. 


252 


Dewan. Michelle 


277 


asse, Teresa 




371 


DeChristopher, B. 


240 


DeMichael, Linda 


371 


Dewey. J. 


269 


aiilton, Ryan 




276 


Decker, Robin 


371 


Deniick, Mark 


371 


Dewitt. Christine 


246. 371 


aValle, Mark 


260 


371 


DeClerk, Travis 


283 


Demirdjian. J. 


263 


Deyarmond. Constance 


371 


avella, Mike 




37 


DeFiebre, Jonathan M. 


281 


Dempsey. Kristen 


371 


Deyerier. C. 


253 


avidow, Seth 




176 


DeFilly, Patty 


352 


Denenberg, Jill 


285 


Deysher. Jennifer 


248, 371 


avidson, Mindy 




277 


Defrates, Carlee 


243 


Deng. Xiaoxi 


371 


Diamond. Wendy 


239 


avies, J. 




264 


Degler. Aaron 


371 


Denning, Pamela 


257, 371 


Diaz. M. 


264 


avis, Brenl 


» • • • 


371 


Degraff. D. 


246 
• ••••< 


Denton, Mark 


267 

# # # # # 


Dickenson. John 


312 



VI 
Y 



16 The Supreme Court ruled that municipalities may not use single-family zoning to bar group homes for ciisableci people, 
including recovering alcoholics and drug addicts, by enforcing occupancy limits in a discriminatory manner. 

17 The Clinton Administration imposed the largest tariff ever imposed by Washington against any trading partner-on 13 
Japanese luxuiy cars that accounted for nearly $6 billion in U.S. sales last year, including Toyota, Nissan and Honda's flagship 
lines of cars. 

21 Congress made a proposal which could help resettle 20,000 Vietnamese refugees in the United States. Asian nations feared 
the plan might encourage new refugees. 

23 The Supreme Court ruled today that in the absence of a constituticjnal amendment, neither states ncM" Congress may limit the 
number of terms that members of Congress can serve. The vote was 5-4. 

28 France and its NATO allies renewed diplomatic efforts to stop the violence in Bosnia and asked Russia to help persuade the 
Serbs to free U.N. troops seized as hostages. 

30 The United States, Britain, France, Germany and Russia resolved to bolster the UN. force in Bosnia to deter rebel Serbs from 
raids that have left more than 300 peacekeepers hostage. 



Index 



421 



AM0C0...EXPL0RE THE POSSIBILITIES. 




Vvhen it comes to your future, anything's possible, especially 

if you work at Amoco Corporation. We're a global energy and 

chemical enterprise, with many exciting opportunities in a broad 

range of disciplines. 

We're also a strong, dynamic company with a well-earned 

reputation for environmental stewardship — a reputation we've 

worked hard for over the years. 

If your technical or business talents are balanced with creativity, 

initiative, and communication skills, you could find the perfect 

starting point on an Amoco team. 

uo come explore Amoco ... check your college placement office 

for information about career opportunities. Our world class 

organization is worth a good look. 



Amoco Corporation 
Explore the possibilities^ 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 





le be^innlns 
ndlngf career. 






One of the top 20 banks in the world, ABN AMRO 
has bulit a reputation as a solid, reliable institution 
with a commanding international presence and for- 
midable financial capabilities. In fact, ABN AMRO is 
one of the few banks worldwide with a double-A 
credit rating. 

Combined, our U.S. assets rank ABN AMRO as one 
of America's leading financial institutions. And we 
are growing. By cultivating simple core values- 
people, team, quality and results-ABN AMRO has 
been able to expand its global network even as other 
large banks rein in the scope of their international 
operations. To enhance this successful expansion ef- 
fort, we have created a new training program: the Treasury Associate Program. 

This Is a 12 month program designed to attract achievement-oriented leaders to 
join our team and learn the various components of Treasury. After being as- 
signed a mentor, training begins with studies through regular seminars and reading 
assignments of the history of markets, regulatory issues, theoretical aspects of 
trading, compliance and ethics and treasury systems. From there. Treasury 
Associates are rotated periodically to learn firsthand the sales and trading pro- 
cedures and techniques in Foreign Exchange, Derivatives, Money Markets, 
Government Securities and Proprietary Trading Areas. 

Throughout the program, the mentor seizes as a source of information and 
support as the Associate makes the transition from classroom to the trading 
floor. Successfully complete the program and earn a permanent position with 
ABN AMRO North America. 

To qualify, a bachelor's degree in Business, Economics, or Mathematics and a GPA 
of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale are required. You need to be competitive, flexible and 
profit-motivated with outstanding communication and quantitative skills. 

For consideration, direct resume to: Recruiter, ABN AMRO, 135 S. LaSalle 
St., Ste. 546, Chicago, IL 60603. 



f^ 



ABN-AMRD 




COULD YOUR WORK 
EXHIBIT AT THE LOUVRE? 

Monsanto's does. Our Saflex' brand interlayer — commonly used in 
car windshields to prevent shattering — protects the enigmatic portrait 
of the Mono Lisa. 

Our researchers have also created one of the best drugs available 
for treating high blood pressure. Some are developing genetically 
improved crops. Others recently perfected the first all-natural fat 
substitute. 

At Monsanto, there's a world of opportunity we're passing on to the 
best and brightest MBA graduates. New managers take responsibility 
for developing plans for growth of new businesses. Other challenges 
include analyzing the strategic directions of business units and 
redesigning business processes. 

Please send your resume to the Office of Professional Staffing and 
University Relations, 800 North Lindbergh Drive, Mail Zone C2NI^, 
Dcpt. NWLIS, St Ix)uis, MO 63167, Attn: Valentino Martinez. An equal 
opixirtimity emi^loyer, m/f/d/v. 



Monsanto 



i 



422 



Advertisements 



)ickinson, Traci 


371 


Douthard, Ty 


156, 157 


, 160 


Eaton, L. 


257 


Esenler, Bora 


175 


)idos, S. 


252 


Dove, Megan 




310 


Eaton, Patrick R. 


317 


Esko, Ryan 


273 


)ieckmann, Therron 


238 


Downes, Emily 


123, 257 


, 412 


Ebelhack, Amy 


310 


Essington, Chad 


373 


)iehl, Jason 


241 


Downey, S. 




257 


Ebert, Roman 


273 


Estacio, Kristine 


373 


)ielic2. Dave 


280 


Downs, C. 




244 


Eblen, Jennifer 


373 


Estacop, K. 


257 


Jiesiel. K, 


240 


Doyle, E. 




246 


Eby, K. 


252 


Estandarte, Anne 


373 


)ieter, Kathryn 


332 


Doyle, Steve 




283 


Eby, Kristin 


373 


Estell, Carey 


209 


)ietrich, Shane 


371 


Drach, J. 




255 


Ecker, Thomas 


373 


Esworthy, Jennifer 


255, 308 


Dietzler, R. 


264 


Dralle, Douglas 




373 


Ecklund, E. 


240 


Ethcheson, A. 


253 


Jigate, Danielle 


371 


Drennan, Phil 




242 


Eden, Blaine 


238 


Etheridge, Jason A. 


281 


J)igate, M. 


250 


Dressel, M. 




349 


Eder, L. 


240 


Etters, Jennifer 


243 


bihos, A. 


264 


Drews, Sharon 




373 


Eder. Linda 


373 


Evans, Angela 


94 


5ikhoff, Carolien 


165 


Dries, Katie 




252 


Edidin, Mindy 


373 


Evans, C. 


246 


Jillman. Cynthia 


371 


Drinan, David 


242, 


.373 


Edmiston, Catherine 


373 


Evans, K. 


240 


pillon. D. 


263 


Drinan, Lee 




338 


Edmonson, Jennifer 


275, 373 


Evans, Ryan 


293 


limmick. jim 
linneen, Darrik 


290 


Drinkall, Allyson 


333 


,338 


Edmund, J. 


253 


Ewald, Annmarie 


276 


263 


Droho, Jennifer 




373 


Edwards, A. 


264 


Ewalt, J. 


250 


')ivane, Patricia 


371 


Drost, J. 




240 


Edwards, Jay 


276 


Ewing, Betca 


134 


iiversiev, George 


371 


Drugan, Tom 




242 


Edwards, Jeremy 


283 


Eyman, L. 


255 


Jixon, Helen 


371 


Drusa, Brad 




283 


Edwards, Julie 


373 






lixon, Kelly 


349, 371 


Dubin, Stephanie 




239 


Edwards, Sara 


373 






lixon. L. 


244 


DuBois, M. 




264 


Egawa, Edward 


373 






liizon, Angelo 


371 


DuBruin, Jessica 




298 


Egel, E. 


266 


Fabbre, Jodine ^^^ 


^ 373 


to, Khach 


371 


DuClos, Bahama 




252 


Eggstaff, Justin 


263 


^^^H 


M -'53 


)ockeiy, Robin 


243 


DuClos, W. 




252 


Egidi, E. 


252 


Fabian, Josh ^^^^^^ 


203 


tockins, Jennifer 


327 


Dudycz, Oksana 




373 


Egly, K. 


252 


Fabian, Joshua^^^^^^ 


■ 373 


)QCter, Jason 


93 


Duensing. David 




242 


Egonmwan, Kimberly 


310 


J. Hfll^^^^^^B 


■ 257 


iodds, L. 


278 


Duesterhaus, Stacie 


266, 


,373 


Ehlers, Matt 


287 


Fabre, Jodi ^^^^^^H 


271 


lodge, T. 


263 


Duffey, Melissa 




271 


Eichen, Rodney 


332 


^^H 


246 


toell, Erin 


371 


Duffield, Gwendolyn 




373 


Einfelt, Jill 


276 


Fahlen, Kristen ^^^^H 


239 


toell, Susan 


371 


Duffy, Margaret 




373 


Eisner, Anna 


239 


^^H 


373 


toench, Steve 


293 


Duggan. John 




261 


EkI. T. 


244 


Falat, Thomas K. ^^HjL 


373 


loesnitz, Tom 


291 


Duhig, Maureen 




325 


Ekiund, Michael 


287 


Falese, A. ^^^^ 


257 


toherty, Shawn 


407 


Duitsman, Kristin 


269, 316, 


,373 


Ekstrom, Tara 


271 


Falk, Amanda 


277 


lolan, J. 


257 


Duke, S. 




275 


El-Dinary, Ayman 


373 


Falkenthal, Denise 


373 


lolbin, Tom 


371 


Dulay, Claro 




373 


Elarde, Joseph 


282 


Fall. S. 


257 


loles, Kurt 


371 


Dulemba, Lori 




271 


Elhers, Matt 


321 


Faliek, Cariye 


243 


tolezal, Sarah 


325, 371 


Dulick, Jason 




159 


Elijah, Dina 


209 


Faller. Chad 


284 


toll. Amy 


277 


Dum, Karyn 




277 


Elkins, Paulina 


327 


Famatid, Rommel 


327, 373 


tolliger, Melissa 


371 


Dumalski, A. 




246 


Elko, J, 


294 


Fancher, Erin 


310 


tollman, Cindy 


271 


Dumbrava, G. 




246 


Ellington, Sara 


271 


Farber, A. 


250 


tombrowski, Robert 


373 


Dumit, Marina 




373 


Elliot, S. 


294 


Fans. J. 


275 


tominiak, Erin 


131 


DuMoulin, Adam 


310, 


, 373 


Elliott, Nancy 


300 


Farmer, A. 


331 


tominiak. Erin B, 


373 


Duncan, Jeff 




284 


Ellis, G. 


331 


Farmer, Angela 


373 


lonahoe, J, 


294 


Dunkel, A, 




253 


Ellis, Geoff 


52 


Farnsworth, Katie 


276 


lonahue, S, 


257 


Dunlap, J. 




253 


Ellis, J. 


252 


Farnsworth, William 


273 


long, Karen 


120 


Dunn, K. 


244, 


,331 


Elms, Lisa 


373 


Farnum, Marshall 


242 


tonnelly. A, 


257 


Dunn, Katie 




334 


Elwtood, Matthew 


279, 373 


Farrell, Rhett 


373 


tonovan, Carrie 


107 


Dunphy, Kathy 


269, 


,373 


Ely, Ryan 


279 


Farris, Mark 


338. 373 


tonovan, L, 


294 


Dunseth, Jason 




312 


Elza. B. 


244 


Farwell, Ed 


326 


tonovan, Ryan 


300 


Dunton. S. 




264 


Eminger, T. 


331 


Faulkner, Brian S. 


284 


tonseth, Jason 


313 


Duong, P. 




331 


Emrich, Dan 


293 


Faulkner, Gretchen 


326 


tooley, Brian 


290 


Dupps, Kristina 




373 


Engel, Ryan 


373 


Fedoryn, John 


373 


tooley, Jonathan 


326 


Dupuis, Christopher 




289 


Engelson. J. 


278 


Fedunyszyn, M. 


331 


tooley, M. 


252 


Dupuis, Marc 


289, 


373 


Enger, M. 


255 


Fehrenbacher, Jessica 


332 


tooley, Michelle 


373 


Durden, N. 




257 


England, Dan 


37 


Felbinger, Melissa 


373 


[ore, Maureen 


271 


Durham, S. 




278 


Englehardt, John 


289 


Feldheim, Rachel 


239 


torfman. Ken 


88 


Durkin, Amy 




373 


Englehart, Erik 


373 


Feldman, Amanda 


373 


lorighi, J. 


246 


Durkin, Leslie 


294, 


373 


Enright, Jeff 


289 


Fell, Todd 


63, 90 


lorio, Stephanie 


243 


Dvaro, A. 




264 


Enrique, Albert 


137, 241 


Fellman, L. 


269 


torn, Dave 


238 


Dvorachek, Eric 




289 


Ensch, Kathryn 


373 


Felver, Kori 


243 


torsay, Dave 


179 


Dye, A. 




264 


Enstrom, Jeff 


290 


Fen, Elena 


257, 373 


jiorsey. Brad 


238 


Dyer, Aaron 




347 


Epelbaum, Leonard 


■ 287 


Fenoglio, J. 


246 


torsey, C. 


275 


Dyksta, Amy 


373, 


240 


Epperson, K. 


278 


Fenster. Scott 


373 


loucha, H. 


294 


Dziedzic, Jason 




373 


Epperson, T. 


278 


Ferega, Stacy 


316 


iioucha. Heather 


373 








Erans, L. 


275 


Ferguson, E. 


264 


j'oud, J. 


244 








Ereckson, E. 


253 


Fernandex, V. 


263 


foughney, J. 


252 


V"""*^ 






Erickson, Chris 


283 


Fernandez, Cindy 


334 


toughty, L. 


294 


Eadlei, Justin m1 


^ 


373 


Ernat, C. 


253 


Fernandez, Elizabeth 


290 


touglas, Elizabeth 


373 


Earnist, J. *^«iH|g 


m 


269 


Ernst, L, 


242 


Fernando, W. 


266 


'ouglas, L. 


236 


Eathiii'jton, Kevin 




284 


Eruk, Hence 


352 


Ferro, Marc 


373 


touglas, Steve 


326 


Eaton, Jr. Jeffery 


299, 


373 


Erwin, Craig 


373 


Ferro, T. 


240 



J 

u 

N 
E 



1 Christopher Reeves, the star of Superman, fell while riding his horse and was paralyzed, 

6 South Africa's newly created supreme court made its first major decision that abolished the death penalty. 

7 President Clinton issued his first veto, sending back to Congress a $16,4 billion package of spending cuts. He said the reason 
for the veto was that it would cut education to save pet Congressional projects. 

13 Tennessee woman Jennie Bain was indicted on first degree murder charges in the hypothermia deaths of two children who 
she left in a car while she partiecl with friends in a motel. 

18 The United Nations gave up its attempt to protect Sarajevo in exchange for the release of the remaining 26 peacekeepers 
who were held hostage by the Bosnian Seros. 



INDEX 



423 



u 

N 
E 



20 



28 



\ member of the religious sect Aum Shinrikyo hijacked a Japanese plane that held 365 people and demanded that its sect 
'cader be released. 

President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt suivived an assassination attempt without injury. Several gunmen had opened fire while 
he was on his way to the African summit meeting in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. 

Lairopean Union leaders decided to put off plans for a common currency from 1997 to Jan. 1, 1999, due to Europe's econom- 
ic problems with high unemployment and heavy budget deficits. 

President Clinton ruled that public schools can require drug testing for student athletes even if they are not suspected of drug 

use. 

Japan and the United States averted economic war with an agreement on automobile trade that President Clinton hailed as, 
■'a major step toward free trade throughout the world." 



Feny, Kristin 
Fesi, Carmelina 
Fetta. Traci 
Fetter, Rochelle 
Feurer, E. 
Fewkes, Lesley 
Fick. Julia 
Ficklin, Kent 
Fidler, Chris 
Fie.ster, Andy 
Figatner, D. 
Figura, James 
File. Shani 
Filin.son, Wendy 
Filipowski, Chrissy 
Fin. K. 
Finck. T. 
Fine. Barbara 
Finlayson. Audrey 
Finley, Anne 
Finn. M, 

Fiorello. Michelle 
Fischer. Chri.sti 
Fischer. Edwin 
Fischer, Jocelyn 
Fischer, .\I. 
Fischer. Timothy 
Fisher. Kim 
Fisher. R, 
Fisher. Tom 
Fitch. Ke\in 
Fitpold. Kirk L. 
Fittanto, S, 
Fittanto, Su,san 
Fitzgerald, Edward 
Fitzgibbons, M. 
Fitzwater, Shane 
Flach, Ryan 
Flaig. Jen 
Flamm, S. 
Flammang, R. 
Fleck, Kevin 
Fleenor, J, 
Fleischer, Claire 
Fleming. Karen 
Fleming, Ryan 
Flesner, Jennifer 
Flessner, Andy 
•lessner, Jolene 

lewelling, Janet 

liss, .M. 

lock, S. 

loers. A, 

lores, Ed 

lores, Fabiola 

lores, I.izdelia 

lores, .Martha 
-lorez. A. 

lowers, Alli.son 

lowers, LaToya 

lowers, Niki 

lowers, Tara 

liie^el, Rebecca 

lynn. Adrianne 

lynn, J 

lynn, Jennifer 

ockler, Ix;,slie 

o^any, Brian 

oley. Klizalx-lh 

oley, Usa Manstielo 

olcy. M. 

olt^, Shane 



276 
2S3 
120 
239 
349 
276, 373 
253, 373 
283 
260 
280 
349 
137. 241, 374 
374 
83 
310 
264 
255 
239 
374 
71 
246 
374 
374 
374 
239, 338 
250 
289 
243 
240 
291 
293 
284 
253 
253 

374 

257 
374 
280 
239 
255 
244 
242 
253 
20. 28, 52, 98 
243, 338, 374 
237 

300, 374 
267 
374 
374 
275 
244 
264 
310 
290 
290 
374 
253 
374 

299, 374 
277 
374 
374 
374 
244 

342, 374 
374 

238, 374 
.■574 
311 
2"K 

290, 374 



Foley, Tom 
Folkenroth. Jason 
Foncannon, Michael 
Fong, Agnes 
Foppe, Paul 
Forbes, Jeremy 
Ford, Matthew 
Forgy, Darren 
Forman, A, 
Forsberg, L. 
Foster, Brad 
Foster. Greg 
Foster, J. 





237 


Foster, Joella 




374 


Foster, Ryan 




374 


Foster, T. 




374 


Fournier, Mark 


39 


311 


Fournier, Mike 




374 


Fowler, A. 




406 


Fox, Jeni 


279 


374 


Fox, Michael 




266 


Fox, Ryan 




253 


Fox, Ryan E. 




242 


Foxx, Matthew 




242 


Frake, Aimee 




294 


France, Mike 



252 
313 
291 
287 
287 
278 
271 
276 
374 
281 
242 
325 
293 




Christopher Weil 



Franchini, Jessica 
Francour, Erik 
Franey, Rebecca 
Franiuk, Renae 
Frank, Dan 
Frank, Matt 
Frank, Matthew 
Frank, Nick 
Frank, S. 
Franke, Erica 
Franke, Mark 
Franklin, D. 
Frantilla, Carol 
Frasca, A. 
Frasca, J. 
Frederick, J. 
Freedman, Stacy 
Freehill, Velda 
Freehill, Whitney 
Freeman, L, 
Freeman, Stepanie 
Freese, C. 
Freese. Chad 
Freese. Danielle 
Freeze, Kelly 
Freidman, Amy 
Freidman, Julie 
Freidman, Stacy 
Frese. B. 
Frese. Danielle 
Frese, Rebekah 
Fresso, Timothy 
Frett, A. 

Freund. Cassandra 
Freund, Jessica 
Frey, S, 

Fricker. Christine 
Frieders, Daun C, 
Friedline, C. 
Friedman, Dana 
Friedman. David 
Friesz, Shelley 
Frigillana. L. 
Frigo, Amy 
Frigo, Kerri 
Frobish, A, 
Frodyma, Melissa 
Froeschl, Stephanie 
Frost, J. 
Fro.st, M. 
Fruend, C. 
Fiy. John 
FiydrNch, Frank 
Fudali. F. 
I'udge. Kara 
Fuhr. Ke\in 
I iilk-r. H, 
lullci. C Biyce 
I iillcr. P 
Fulton, .\nita 
l-urnianski, T, 
Furmanski, Tracy 
Furtak, Nicole 
Fvnn, lennil'er 



2(>" 






t;,ib,i, iv 

(i.ibricl, ,\ 

lialiriel, Ani>' 

tiacli, Dan^ 

1 .,ulni,m, Snctoluua^ 




424 



Index 





ge, V. 


255 


Geister, Ryan W. 




375 


Glover, J. 




266 


Grant, Melissa 


248, 375 


hlbeck, A. 


255 


Geistler, Owen 




277 


Go, Jenny 




375 


Grant. Noreen 


375 


I lante, Jacques 


.•509 


Gelbuda, Billy 




287 


Goben, Matthew 


308, 342, 375 


405 


Granzbell, A. 


348 


(|lco, Jodi 


374 


Gelfeld, Dana 




239 


Godar, C, 




291 


Gras, Jenny 


243 


s 


le, Louis 


324, 374 


Genender, Amy 




285 


Godfrey, Doug 




241 


Grasso, Michelle 


248 


< 


llegf). Pilar 


243 


Gen.sler, James 




242 


Goebel, Jodi 




277 


Gratza, H. 


294 


(jllick, S. 


294 


Georgacopolous, Demetrios 




291 


Goeddel, Darrel 




282 


Grau, N. 


294 


(Nick. Siephanie 


374 


Geppinger, A. 




253 


Goeddel, T. 




253 


Graves, Brad 


238 


'Hiniuiv. Hal 


282 


Geraci, Karen 




375 


Goele, Madhn 




57 


Graves, D. 


244 


1 lli\ .111, (;iiris 


290 


Gerakiaris, Ali 




336 


Goetz, A. 




244 


Gray, Juliann 


248, 375 


II. .1 I'atrick 


374 


Gerald. K. 




269 


Goger. Gustav 




326 


Gray, Lisa 


378 


K.in, C. 


250 


Gerbasi, Daniel 




342 


Goitein, Dan 


128 


261 


Gray, M. 


246 


milii, KarthiKeyan 


44 


Gerleman. Laura 




375 


Gold, Katie 




239 


Gray, Melissa 


313 


Mui draham 


261 


Gerniann. C. A. 




242 


Goldberg, Andrew 


339. 350 


375 


Graziano. Marie 


338 


iiuw ish. 1- 


275 


Germeny. A. 




250 


Goldberg, Frannie 




239 


Grazulis, V. 


349 


nm '11, M. 


275 


Gerry, T. 




253 


Goldberg, Maren 




239 


Green, A. 


257 


nil. III. Tim 


262 


Gerstein, Kimberiy 


285 


375 


Golden, Matt 




313 


Green, Amy 


378 


11^. how, Dean 


374 


Gerstenecker. David 




284 


Goldfarb, S. 




240 


Green, Dorian 


211 


iiiucrker, Brian 


282 


Gertsma, J. 




240 


Goldman, Sharon 




243 


Green, G. 


250 


> "1 uan 


374 


Gervase, Brian 




260 


Goldman, Shoshana 


79, 335 


375 


Green, J. 


250, 331 


r.in.inlia. A. 


264 


Gervase, Dave 




260 


Goldstein, Daniel 




375 


Green, Kristi 


378 


il.ishch, J. 


240 


Gervasse, M. 




253 


Goldstein, M. 




264 


Green, Tina 


346 


!■ ( MU, A. 


246 


Getz, K. 


275 


331 


Goldstein. Rachel 




239 


Greenberg, Natalie 


239 


1 !i , ,iu, Alicia 


374 


Geu. T, 




264 


Goldstein, Stacey 


239 


375 


Greenberg, Pam 


378 


ucha. B, 


331 


Geurrini, Lou 




290 


Golfader, Lindy 




239 


Greenberg. Paula 


239 


(rcia, Adolfo 


375 


Ghalayini, Serene 




243 


Golub, Lance 




375 


Greene, Jennifer 


338 


(jTcia, Adriana 
(|rcia. Angeio 


249 


Ghosh, Abhijit 




375 


Gomeric, J. 




244 


Greenfield. Allison 


248, 378 


375 


Ghuman. Pretti 


240 


324 


Gomez, Kathy 




243 


Gregg, A. 


269 


Crcia, Jennifer 


406 


Giannini. Louis 




375 


Gomez, Oralia 




290 


Gregg. Rachel 


271 


((rcia, Melis,sa 


290 


Gib. Alison 




276 


Gomez, Patricia 




271 


Gregre. Joel 


378 


(ircia, Myrna 


375 


Gibbs, Tamara 




375 


Gomez, Terecita D. 




249 


Grena. Julie 


271, 387 


(rdner, Lisa 


375 


Gibson, A. 


264 


349 


Gomorczak. Christy 




243 


Gresko, John 


378 


(rdner. Matt 


280 


Gibson, Andrea 




375 


Gonzalez. Andrea 




243 


Grickevich, Andy 


30 


(rfield, K. 


244, 348 


Gibson, Dan 




51 


Gonzalez. Felix 




375 


Grieshaber. Christian 


298, 310 


Crfieid. T, 


244 


Giebelhausen. M. 




251 


Gonzalez. Miguel 




285 


Grieve, Andrew 


378 


(rgano. M. 


240 


Gier. Jonathan 




375 


Gonzalez, Wes 




289 


Griffin, E. 


331 


(rgano. Melanie 


240 


Gieseke. Brian 




375 


Goodall, Jeff 




261 


Griffin, J. 


269 


(ribay, Liz 


243 


Gifford, Adrienne 




375 


Goodman, Julie 




375 


Griffith, Becky 


37 


(rite, Pete 


260 


Gifford. Scott 




293 


Goodman, Lisa 




239 


Grijnsztein, Daniel 


378 


(rlich. Karen 


375 


Gilbert.so. S. 




253 


Goodman. M. 


252 


257 


Grikevich. Andy 


93 


Carlson, K. 


244 


Giles, Margaret E. 




375 


Goodman. Madonna 




375 


Grimes, Jodi 


277 


(rner, Allen 


375 


Gill, Aneela 




375 


Goodman. Will 




375 


Grisolano, J. 


294 


(rntano. A. 


264 


Gill, John 


283 


375 


Goodner, Jason 




238 


Grisolano, Mike 


292 


(rr, K. 


278 


Gillespie, Kataka 




299 


Gool, Sanya 




340 


Griswald. Matthew 


378 


(rr, Kim 


134 


Gillespie, M. 




266 


Gordon, Jacqueline 


50 


381 


Griswold. M. 


331 


(rr. Tammy 


375 


Gillett. Lisa 




277 


Gordon, Marcy 


52 


375 


Gritters, Joel 


378 


(jrrett, Becky 


172, 173 


Gillis, Mike 




241 


Gorfin, Eugene 




375 


Grode, K. 


294 


(rrett, C. 


244 


Gilman, Adam 




375 


Gorman. J. 




257 


Grodskey. Ja.son 


81 


(rrett, Christine D. 


221, 375 


Gilomer, J. 




264 


Gorman. Katherine 




375 


Grohering, Jeremy 


292 


(rrett, Kenya 


299, 375 


Gilroy, J. 




252 


Gorney. J. 




257 


Grohlich, S. 


269 


(rrett. Shelley 


326 


Gilstrap. Kristen 




276 


Gorny. Kristen 


294 


375 


Groner, Allen 


378 


(rrison. A. 


246 


Gimpert, Matt 




261 


Gorski. Dawn 




375 


GrosboU, Angela 


294. 316 


drritano, Mary 


375 


Gindler. Matt 


218 


219 


Gortowski. Andrew 




375 


Gross, C. 


331 


(rske, S. 


244 


Ginsberg, Scott 




375 


Gothier. Sean 




375 


Gross, Christy 


378 


(rson, Jennifer 


285 


Giorgetti, Duane 


292 


375 


Gottool, John 




242 


Grotto, Matthew 


300, 301, 378 


(.rwood, Mark 
(|rza. C. 


283 


Gipson, Tawanda 




375 


Goulding, Liz 




243 


Growney, Alicia 


246, 378 


252 


Gitles. Marci 




239 


Govindaiah, Rajesh 




375 


Growney, Kimberiy 


331, 378 


(rza, Casey 


342 


Giunta, K. 




264 


Goznobi, Tahazida 




375 


Grube, Dave 


283 


Crza, Maria 


72 


Giuriceo, Christina 




375 


Grabowski, Lawra 


50, 294 


375 


Gaimish, L. 


331 


(.fit. Stephanie 


333, 338 


Given. K. 




275 


Grabowski, Liz 




243 


Grzeskowiak. J. 


250 


(jumer, Molly 


269. 338 


Given, Lori 




375 


Gradford, E. 




269 


Grzyb, L. 


264 


( uthier, Christopher 


34, 44 


Gladding, Sophie 


118 


119 


Gradman. Steven A. 


352 


375 


Guebert, Danielle 


378 


C|Zdic. l^. 


349 


Glade, Todd W, 




375 


Grady. B. 




251 


Guenther, Grant 


313 


(ziano. Maria 


243, 375 


Gladney, Anthony 




81 


Grady. J. 




253 


Guenther, Ron 


205 


( . Shenzhang 


375 


Glaenzer, Dan 




238 


Graff, Ryan 




218 


Guerra, Lisa 


316, 338 


(.anuleas, M. 


257 


Glass, Diane 




375 


Graham. Douglas 




375 


Gugala, Stephen 


378 


Cjbhardt. Brandon 


242 


Gleason, Katherine 




375 


Graham. Jolene 




375 


Guleserian, M. 


246 


(e. Stanley J. 


281 


Gleeson, Juliann 




243 


Graham. Lindsey 


257 


372 


Gulley, T. 


246 


(hring, C. 


255 


Gleich. Denise 




243 


Granata, T. 




331 


GuUo, Sam 


347 


Cjhrke. Kelly 


240 


Gleich. Jennifer 


271 


375 


Grano, Paul 




302 


Guo, Connie 


327 


(hn. Trey 


300, 301, 331. 375 


Glennon. K 




278 


Grant. Erin 




338 


Gupta, Jay 


378 


tl 


ger, Ron 


279 


Glomski, Leah 




338 


Grant. Joe 




338 


Gupta. Kaushal 


378 



\ 

J 

L 
{ 



2 United Nations hea(dquarters in Bosnia was hit with a mortar shell by Bosnian Serb rebels. The mortar shell wounded three 
peacekeepers and an embassy guard. 

9 Two District of Columbia men were arrested after one of them threatened to kill President Clinton through telephone calls. 
Agents then traced the call to a house where the men were foimd. 

President Clinton decided that the First Amendment did not convert our schools into "religious free zones." He sent a memo 
to all schools saying what would and would not be allowed. 

Ambassador Var Muoth reopened Cambodia's embassy in Washington after it had been closed for 20 years because of the 
Khmer Rouge takeover of Cambodia. 



12 



20 



INDEX 



425 



the United States government decided to send a total of $100 million for "heat aid" to 18 states due to extreme summer tem- 
i'cratures. 

i he Senate, in a foreign policy defeat for the Clinton Administration, voted to end U.S. participation in the arms embargo in 
1 >; onia-Herzegovina. 

h S. officials took a Palestinian into custody who they said was one of the senior leaders of Hamas, a militant Islamic group, 
responsible for bombings in Israel. 

Walt Disney Company and ABC made a faiiy-tale marriage in a deal worth $19 billion. The merger was the second largest in 
U.S. history'. It brought together the most famous creator and the most successful TV network. 



I 



Gupta, Mitun 
Gupta, S. 
Gurgel, Kevin 
Guritz, Cheryl 
Gurley, A. 
Gurnani, P. 
Gustafson. A, 
Gutiila, Shauna 
Gutman, Dana 
Gutterudge, C. 
Guyot, Brad 
Guyot, Dan 
Guzik, S. 
Guzlas, Courtney 
Guzzino, T. 
Gwillam, Brad 



Haacke, 
Haag, B^ 
Haaland, Wendy 
Haas, Christopher 
Habblew A. 
Habisohn Kim 
Hachmeisier, Gregoiy 
Hacker. .Michelle 
Hackett, Joshua 
Hackett. Karherine 
Hackett. .Susan 
Hackman. Brian 
Hadjikyriacou, Eleni 
Haenisch, George 
Haenitsch. April 
Haenel. Scott 
Haery, Susan 
Haevner, H. 
Hage, Sara 
Hagemann, Matt 
Hagen, Kara 
Hagen, M. 
Haggerty. C. 
Hahn. Brice 
Hahn, Rebecca 
Haiges, Robin 
Hainline, Diane 
Halac, Keiley 
Hale, Jenny 
Haley, K. 
Hall, A. 

Hall. Amy Noel 
Hall, C 
Hall, Jason 
Hall, Jeff 
Hall, Kely.ssa 
Hall, Maggie 
Hall, Michael 
Hall, N. 
Hall. Ryan B. 
1 lallbers, S. 
Halstead, Brian 
Halverson, T. 
Ilamid, N, 
Hamill. Patricia 
llammel, .Mall 
Hammill, l!ri< 
Hammond, Karl 
I Ian, Junn Ho 
Man, Mike 
I Ian. Wonsun 
llancoik, C;hris 
llan< 0( k, James 



271 


397 


Handler, Lisa 




269 


Handley, Douglas 




282 


Handley, Eric 


249 


378 


Hanigan, Brian 




240 


Haning. Will 




.^31 


Hankins. Brian 




331 


Hanley, M. 


246 


378 


Hanley, S. 




239 


Hanlon, M. 




264 


Hann, A. 




128 


Hanna, J. 




130 


Hannah, D. 




264 


Hanneken, A. 


138 


139 


Hanning. Jay 




257 


Hannula, Debbie 




242 


Hanrahan, Jessica 
Hansen, A. 
Hansen, Christina 
Hansens, Roger 




271 


Hanson, D. 


241, 339, 351 


378 


Han.son. Debbie 


■1^^ 264 


378 


Hanson, Eric 


^^^^ 


378 


Hanson, John 


^^^^^ 


257 


Hanson, M. 


^^B244 


300 


Hanson, Susan 


^^^H 


378 


Haramija, Mark 


■Ki 


327 


Hard, Matt 


^ 238 


332 


Hardee, Jennifer 


244 


378 


Hardesty, Brent 




271 


Hardin, Don 


277, 324 


378 


Hardy, Amy 




378 


Hardy, J. 




280 


Hardy, Kevin 


266, 342 


378 


Hardy, S. 




378 


Haremza. Rebecca 




378 


Harenza, Kris 




294 


Hargave, J. 


93, 349 


378 


Hargraves, A. 


300 


301 


Harmon, Laura 




378 


Harms, Angie 




236 


Harms, Jason 




244 


Harm.sen. Mike 




378 


Haro, Gina 


243 


378 


Haro, Vanessa 


236 


378 


Haronik, Ann 




378 


Harpe, Tara 


246 


378 


Harper, Kim 




277 


Harris, Adrienne 




251 


Harris, C. 




275 


Harris, Casey 




338 


Harris, Dan 




244 


Harris, James Berton 




242 


Harris, Jen 




327 


Harris, Jenny 




378 


Harris, Michelle 




335 


Harris. Nile 




378 


Harris, R. 




255 


Harris. Robin 




284 


Harri.son, D. 




275 


Harri.son, Melanie 




290 


Harroun, J. 




253 


Harsch, Kelli 


266 


349 


Harsch, Kelli E, 




338 


Harshbarger, Jennifer 




293 


llarshbarger, Mike 




168 


Harshbarger. Tim 


269, 282 


331 


Han, Brian 




378 


Han, Greg 




324 


llartman, Darren 




378 


Hanman, S, 




3.30 
37K 


llartmann, Ci 
ll.irlm.inn, I'homas 



285 


Hartmen, J. 


378 


Hanter, Michael 


242 


Harty, K. 


378 


Hartzer, Jeffrey 


291 


Harvey, Amanda 


378 


Harvey, Caroline 


246 


Harvey, Michelle 


257 


Haskell, Kim 


251 


Hasler, A. 


275 


Hasselbring, Timothy 


246 


Hassell, B. 


278 


Hastings, Jim 


294 


Hatfield, L. Mark 


238 


Hatfield. Sheri 


271, 402 


Hattori, Takako 


378 


Haugberg, L. 


257 


Hauman, J. 


257, 378 


Haupt, Christine 


378 


Havard, Steve 


255 


Have, C. 


378 


Havener, Heidi 


261, 378 


Havey, Carrie 


300 


Havranek, Scott 


294 


Hawker, E. 


276 


Hawkins, Jen 


292 


Hawkins, Jenny 


260 


Hawkinson, Ben 


378 


Hawonh, Sarah 


378 


Hawson, John 


164 


Hayden, Jeoffry 


378 


Haye, Tracy 


257 


Hayek, Benjamin 


154, 162 


Hayenga, Heide 


246 


Hayercraft, Z. 


252 


Hayes. Erin 


243 


Hayes. Jennifer 


349 


Hayes, Robert 


257 


Hayes, S. 


378 


Hazer. M. 


277 


Healy, Dan 


267 


Heap, Julia 


262 


Hearn, Laura 


25 


Hearn, Mike 


290 


Hearsley, L. 


266, 378 


Heaton, Alice 


253 


Hebenstreit. Mike 


308, 332 


Hebert, Mike 


378 


Hebert, S. 


253 


Hecht. Brian 


48 


Hecimonich, J. 


37 


Hedger, B. 


40 


Hedin. E. 


324 


Hedkind, Marc 


243 


Hedrick. Brad 


378 


Heedum, D. 


378 


Heedum, Julie 


349 


Hefner, A. 


378 


Hefron. K. 


349 


Hegele, I'ric 


378 


Heidkamp. Jason 


257 


Heil. Brian 


298, 352 


Heind.selm.in, l-niily 


317 


Heine, Krica 


378 


Heiney, Jennifer 


279 


Hcinrik.son. Courtney 


241 


Ik-inz. M, 


379 


Ileinzm.inn, .Aaron 


284 


Heiple, K. 


379 


Hei.ser, M. 


290 


Heisner. Craig 


251 


Heisner. PInil 


379 


Ilciini,in. Daxe 





294 


Heitman, David 




282 


Heitzig, Timothy 




246 


Heldt, Delane 




379 


Helis, Jason 




310 


Hellin, Steven 




379 


Helium. Heather 


253 


379 


Helms, Matthew 


239, 315 


379 


Hemann, Michael 




275 


Hembrough, Shawn 




379 


Hemme, Elizabeth 




244 


Hemphill, LaShurn 




279 


Hempstead, Matt 


349 


379 


Hemrick. Toni 




243 


Henard, Tessa 




379 


Henderson, Matt 




252 


Hendricks, A. 




253 


Hendricks, Chris 




338 


Hendricksen, R. 


157 


160 


Heniff. M. 




240 


Hennenfent, Matthew 




334 


Henning, Catriese 




240 


Henning, Heather 




241 


Henning, S. 


269, 348 


Henningsen, B. 




271 


Henrichs, Melinda 




402 


Henricks, Ken 




283 


Henry, Brad 




36 


Henry, Brian 




379 


Hensley, Chad 




379 


Hensley, Doug 


243 


379 


Henson, Eric 




379 


Henson, K.O.D. 




300 


Hentzel, Q. 




250 


Henwood, K. 




60 


Herbst. Crystal 




379 


Herlien, Charmagne 




379 


Herman, A. 




349 


Herman, N. 




264 


Herman, Neelie 




260 


Hermano, Michael 


266 


379 


Hernandez, A, 


257 


379 


Hernandez, Adriana 




242 


Hernandez, Gabriel 




257 


Hernandez, Gloria 




379 


Hernandez, J. 




379 


Hernandez, Miguel 




164 


Herold, J. 




263 


Herrera, Gilbert 




206 


Herrman, Chad 




264 


Herron, Daniel 




269 


Hertz, Elizabeth 




250 


Heser, B. 




267 


Heskin. John 




203 


Hess, Jennifer 




246 


Hetzer, Kimberl>- 


246 


379 


Heuberger, Brad 




250 


Heyen, Jon 




264 


Heynis, Julie 




379 


Hickey, Elizabeth 




293 


Hickey, Julie 




379 


Hicke>', Maiy 




379 


Hickman, John 




243 


Hicks, Shawna 




243 


Higgins, Edward 


321 


.331 


Hilb, Jennv 




264 


1 liliM, Tammy 




238 


lilies, Uabelle 




257 


Hill. A, 




251 


Hill. Amy 


284 


379 


Hill, Deb 




283 


Hill, lienrv 11, 




327 


Hill. L. 



292 

379 

240 

287 

379 

379 

283, 379 

238, 379 

277. 379 

379 

379 

284 

372 

379 

218 

244 

2-'9 

244 

240 

283. 308 

299, 379 

253, 379 

252 

246 

379 

260 

379 

80 

283 

283 

170, 1-1, 211 

291 

278 

278 

253 

379 

246 

275 

379 

.379 

.331 

379 

379 

379 

269 

285 

331 

291, 379 

292 

379 

379 

240 

24 

379 

255, 379 

69. .30-», 379 

237 

379 

347. 3-9 

379 

2M, 379 

37« 

32" 

2(1-, 379 

239 

277 

32 

278 

342, 379 

358 

261 



I 



426 



Index 



State Farm 

A Great 

Place 

to Work 



Good people made us what we are today . . . leaders in cai; home, and _ 
life insurance. We need more good people to help us keep that position! 
If you are looking for full-time employment, please contact our 
Human Resources Department for information on a wide variety of 

career opportunities at State Farm. 



State Farm Insurance 

Home Office Human Resources 

One State Farm Plaza, SA- 1 

Bloomington, Illinois 61710-0001 

State Farm Insurance Companies • Home Offices: Bloomington. Illinois 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 





something Special 
is Happening at EquisI 



We are searching for the 
University of Chicago's most 
energetic and aggressive 
marl<eters to become Equis 
brol<ers. Our real estate 
strategies have helped major 
corporations reduce 
occupancy costs. 
Help us spread our success. 

For more information, 
please call... 



And We Invite 
You to Play an 
Integral Role. 

Join our team to 
continue building 
a dynamic local 
and national presence. 



Seth Klukoff 

Director of Marketing 8^ 

Communications 

1-800-726-2368 




immg, 



BMl3i1C 

flHDflMHOF 
BI]ILLIf]HC[. 



Dallas Semiconductor Corporation designs, manufactures, and 
markets electronic chips and chip-based subsystems with broad 
applications in computers, controls, scientific and medical equipment, 
automatic identification, telecommunications, consumer electronics, 
and more. Market-driven and committed to intensive new product 
development as the path to sustained, diversified growth, Dallas 
Semiconductor has developed and shipped 21 5 base products with 
over 1 ,000 variations, for more than 8,000 customers worldwide, 
since its founding in 1984. 

Dallas Semiconductor is located in Dallas, Texas, one of the 
largest high-technology employment centers in the U.S. and one of 
the nation's fastest growing metropolitan areas. Cost of living is 
moderate, housing is affordable and Texas has no state income tax. 

Dallas Semiconductor offers an outstanding compensation/ 
benefits package. For a complete and detailed list of job opportuni- 
ties, please visit the Dallas Semiconductor home page on the 
World. Hire server located at "http://world.hire.com". To apply, 
please forward your resume and a cover letter, indicating position of 
interest to: Staffing Dept./COL, Dallas Semiconductor, 4401 South 
Beltwood Parkway, Dallas, TX 7S244-3292; E-mail: 
recruiter@dalsemi.com; World Wide Web: 
"http://www.dalsemi.com/". 
We are proud to be an equal 
opportunity/affirmative action 
employer M/F/D/V. 



9 ■■ DALLAS 
W SEMICONDUCTOR 



Advertisements 



427 



lb 



Republican controlled House sent a powerful conservative message when it made spending cuts of $9.3 billion in 
iomestic spending. 

\ tn^aty to control fishing on tiie open seas and to curtail the overfishing of the world's shared waters was approved by 
niled Nations. 

.crnian prosecutors filed almost 6,000 charges of murder and attempted murder against two company executives for selling 
I'lood products tainted with the viais that caused AIDS. Rock icon Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead died at the age of 53. 
i iie cause of death was diagnosed as a heart attack. 

In El Salvador, rescuers climbed up a volcano to retrieve 65 dead people who were killed when the plane they were in 
crashed against the volcano. A federal indictment filed charges against Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nicols for conspiring the 
Oklahoma City bombing. 

Micke\ Mantle, former New York Yankee legend, died of cancer at the age of 63. 

Hurricane Felix stalled along the coast of North Carolina during the treacherous path up the east coast. It was the fifth hurri- 
cane of the vear. 



Hillemeyer, K. 
Hillier, Janet 
Hillman, Siacy 
Hills, E, 

Hilion, Amanda 
Hilton, K. 
Him,sel, Rick 
Hinchey, Elizabeth 
Hinderliter, Holly 
Hinoiosa, Rita A. 
Hinrichs, R. 
Hinshaw, S. 
Hinz, J. 
Hirsch, S. 
Hirt, Stacey 
Hitchings, Bret 
Hitzelberger, R. 
Hitzemann, Harry 
Hjen.stedt. J, 
Hladik, David 
HIavach, Katie 
Hnadley, T. 
Hoaganson. A. 
Hobin, M, 
Hochmuth, Brett 
Hodapp, J. 
Hodges, L. 
Hodgett, Steve 
Hodgson, M. 
Hoeksema, Jason 
Hoekstra, Robert 
Hofbauer, J. 
Hoferle, Jill 
Hoffer, Gretchen 
Hoffen. Mindy 
Hoffman, Bryce 
Hoffman, Christina 
Hoffman, .Maya 
Hoffman, Richard 
Hoffman, Colby 
Hogan. Jeremy 
Hogan, Molly K. 
Hogel, Heather 
Holcombe, Robert 
Holdmann, Kevin 
Holland, J, 
Holland. Kei.sha 
Hollenback. Matt 

lollett. Heather 

lollister, Courtney 

lollvveck, Francis 

lollywood, M. 

lolm, Kjcrsten 

lolm, S. 

lolmes, A, 

lolmes. B. 

lolmes, S. 

i(jlmcs, Samantha 

I'll per, M. 

lolst, Tracy 

lolze, Scott 

loman, Julie 

lommcma, Scott 

lomoly, J. 

long, Yong Jae 

lonigsthtnidi, I. 

loniotes, Jennifer 

looblcr, J. 

lood. Nalhan 

I'xik. Amy 

looker, Darrick 

lopkins, K. 



244 
379 
285 
264 
294, 308, 379 
275 
178 

264, 379 
25S, 298, 312 
290 
253 
255 
253 
246 
379 
237 
269 
300 
244 

282, 334 
335 
278 
251 
257 

290, 367 
294 
29^1 
242 
252 
379 
292 
257 

253, 379 

236, 379 
252 
237 
380 
380 
380 
237 
237 

281, 380 

380 

154, 157, 160, 162, 163 

310 

266, 348 
380 
33-1 

294, 380 
311 
242 
269 
380 
241 

253, 257 
246 
240 
326 
257 
380 
267 
380 
380 
269 
380 
291 
310 
24 i 
241, 309. 380 
380 
299 
251 



Hopkins, Li.sa 
Hoppe, G. 
Horn, Fred 
Horn, Kyle 
Horn, N. 
Horstman, Craig 
Hor\'ath, L, 
Hoss, Dorrine 
Hoss, Susan 
Houk, Jennifer 
Hoult, Jason 
House, Chad 
Howard, Craig 



327 


380 


Howe, Mary 




294 


Howell, I. 




380 


Howell, Troy 




287 


Howerton, H. 




264 


Hewlett, Rebecca 




241 


Hoyle, Ben 


269 


348 


Hrodey, Andrew 




243 


Hroma, Karen 




243 


Hronek, Andy 




380 


Hsabalis, T. 




284 


H,su, Jason 




291 


Hsu, Victor 




293 


Huang, Emmy 



380 

331 

380 

257 

244, 380 

302, 303 

380 

116, 271 

293 

278 

380 

260 

325 




Steve Dilger and Shep 



Huang, Gerald 
Huang, Rey-Wuei 
Hubbard, Almasi 
Hubbard, Betsy 
Hubbard, Mike 
Hubbert, Sheri 
Hubberts. Eileen 
Huber. Devin 
Hudson, K, 
Hudspeth, Mark 
Huelsmann, Janiece 
Huffman, Joel 
Huffman, Shannon 
Hughes, A. 
Hughes, Ann 
Hughes, David 
Hughes, Jim 
Hughes, Meyako 
Hui, K. 
I kiizenga, A. 
Hulbut, Brandon 
Hulin, Mark 
Hulina, Holly 
Hull. Chris 
Halting, Andrew 
Halting, M. 
Halting, Melissa 
Halting, P. 
Hamay, M. 
Hummel, Scott 
Hunt, Casey 
Hunt, Meli.ssa 
Hunt, Mike 
Hunt, N. 
Hunt, Nicole 
Hunt, R. 
Himter, David 
Huntington, Laura 
Huntley, C. 
Hurelbrink, Michael 
Hurlbut, Brandon 
Hurter, Da\id W, 
Huskey, Julie 
Huston, A. 
Huston, Katie 
Hwa, Joanne 
llwu, Jennifer J. 
Ilveti, K. 
1 l\nes. Colleen 
H\nes, Karen 



87, 266, 



209, 



l,innotti, Ja.son 
Ibciulahl, Stephen 
Ibis, Meryl 
[gnazito, Susan 
Ikcnbony, Stanl* 
lllig.in, Rebecca 
UK, Sascha 
Iniler, Ginger 
linsorn, Kornva' 
liiglc. I'miK 
Ingles, T 
Ingi.issi.i, D 
IngMSM.l, IXui.i 
p|)olilo, J, 
rcta, M.irceliiio 
rwin. Brian 
lAvin, J. 

s.irimong. Nucha 
cnlxTg, Icnnilcr 



len ^^^ 

1 



2(x' 
!'•■} 
33*- 

32, ii. 0" 
2« 
282 

380 
.<80 
»1 
2.to, 348 
^0, 3t<', 318. 380 
278 
MS 
287 
246 
88 
3J8 



428 



Index 




Global Career 
Opportunities 



Become part of a firm with global reach and you not only 
broaden your international horizons but your professional 
horizons as well. The world is changing fast. Intelligent, 
innovative and motivated people will make the most of 
it. That's why starting with a firm that is a recognized 
force in international finance can be one of the most 
important career moves you will make. 

At Merrill Lynch, we offer challenging positions in 
investment banking, debt markets, municipal markets, 
equity markets and institutional sales and trading. As an 
associate, you'll be an important part of the team from 
the start, assuming responsibilities quickly and making 
decisions early. And because we are a meritocracy, 
innovative thinking is encouraged and performance is 
rewarded. That makes a big difference, for us and you. 

The difference is Merrill Lynch. 



Write to: 

Merrill Lynch 

World Financial Center 

North Tower 

New York, NY 10281-1331 




Merrill Lynch 

A tradition of trust. 



Advertisements 429 




MERCK 



Your Success is Here. 



Innovative management style, social responsibility, workforce 
diversity, and environmental concern are the hallmarks of our 
company and the reasons that we have become the world leader in 
health care. Those who choose a career with us will join the best, 
most creative minds in the pharmaceutical industry. Together they 
will strive to realize Merck's corporate mission, which is to provide 
society with superior, innovative products that improve and protect 
human and animal health. 

At Merck, you will fmd many routes to success and many helping 
hands along the way. If you would like to join our very special 
company, please write to: Manager, Human Resources, Merck & 
Co., Inc., P.O. Box 2000, Rahway, New Jersey 07065. RY80-A3 

We are an Equal Opportunity Employer hiring on the basis of 

talent. 

Engineering - 
Biochemical (BS/MS/PhD) - Chemical (BS/MS/PhD) - 
Civil (BS/MS/PhD) - Electrical (BS/MS/PhD) - 
Environmental (BS/MS/PhD) - Industrial (BS/MS/PhD) - 
Mechanical (BS/MS/PhD) 

Science - 
Biological Sciences (BS/MS/PhD) - Biochemistry (BS/MS/PhD) - 
Information Systems (BS/MS/PhD) - Medicine (MD/MD/MBA) - 
Pharmacology (BS/MS/PhD) - Veterinary Medicine (DVM) 



At Coopers fie Lybrand 



OUR CORPORATE LADDER 



IS AN ESCALATOR. 




Coopers & Lybrand L.L. P. 

Extends Our Best Wishes 

to the Class of 1996 



Coopers 
&Lybrand 



Coopers & Lybrand L.L. P. 

a professional services firm 



NOT JUST KNOWLEDGE. KNOW HOW. 



DIFFERENT DEGREES OF SUCCESS 



I Always Wanted 
To Run My Own 

Business. So I 
Joined Enterprise. 



Brad Garrison 

BA, Business Management 

University of Illinois, 1993 

Branch Rental Manager, Champaign 

Enterprise only hires hard-working, entrepre- 
neurial individuals. People who want to learn 
every aspect of running a business, from 
customer service to personnel management. 

Enter our fast-paced business as a 
Management Trainee, and we'll reward your 
dedication and sales ability with raises, 
promotions and the opportunity to go as far as 
your talent will take you. 



Management Trainee 



• A BS/BA degree 

• Strong communication skills, enthusiasm 
and drive 

• Retail/Sales experience a plus 

If you want to learn all aspects of running a 

business while enjoying full pay benefits, join 

the Enterprise team. Call (217) 355-1300, 

or send resume to: 

809 Bloomington Rd., Champaign, IL 

61820, Attn: Tim Guzinski / CRS. 

An equal opportunity employer. 




430 ADVERTISEMENTS 




380 
264, 380 
253 
239 
253 
239 



281 
80 
279 
280 
346 
380 
380 
278 
324 
380 
282 

280, 380 
246 
380 
380 
380 
156 

278, 380 
251 
269 
246 
240, 327, 348 
294 
289 
264 
331 

271, 387 
264 
326 
269 
380 
238 
210 
291 
241 
291 
284 
257 
242 
241 
240 
299 
266 
380 
283 
240 
115 
280 
380 
246 
380 
380 
313 
242 
313 
349 
306 
380 

240, 327 

238, 380 

380 

331 

24 



9^ \ ^-^. _i 




5>> 





Paul Grano 



Fernando Morales, Rey Nunez, Gil Magana, Gil 
Medina and Saul Marchan 



Jimenez. Lily 
Jin, Kyo- Young 
Jodlowski, J. 
Jodlowski, Mark 
Jodlowski, Sandy 
Jogmen, J. 
John, Dana St. 
Johns, Dave 
Johns, Jennifer 
Johns, John 
John,s, JT 
Johns, T, 
Johnsen. B. 



290 


Johnson, A. 


380 


Johnson. Amy 


278 


John.son, Brent 


289 


Johnson. Chad 


248, 380 


Johnson. Chris 


263 


Johnson. Connie 


326 


Johnson. D, 


293 


Johnson, David 


380 


Johnson, David A 


382 


Johnson, Dawn 


287 


Johnson, Diana 


252 


Johnson. E. 


240 


Johnson. Emma 





Johnson. Glynnis 


382 




John.son. J. 


246 




Johnson, Jenelle 


277 




Johnson, Jennifer 


382 




Johnson. Johnny 


154, 155, 161, 162 




Johnson. Julie 


382 




Johnson. K. 


246 




John.son, Kim 


239, 326 




Johnson, Kimberly 


382 




Johnson, Kristi 


243 




Johnson, Lance 


301 




Johnson, Lance E 


300 




Johnson, Marlon 


382 




Johnson, Mikki 


156 




Johnson, S. 


236, 246, 250, 294 




Johnson. Sara 


298 




Johnson, Sarah 


382 




Johnson, T. 


246, 348 




Johnson, Tamara 


382 




Johnston, Jennifer 


382 




Johnston, Johanna 


243 




Johnston. Mark 


382 




Johnston. Meredith 


382 




Johnstone, Eric 


382 




Jokisch, Matt 


260 




Jones, April 


16, 17 




Jones, Gary 


382 




Jones, Christy 


277 




Jones. Elizabeth 


382 




Jones, Erika 


382 




Jones. G. 


255 




Jones, Gayle L. 


332, 382 




Jones, Itch 


206 




Jones, Jacob 


241 




Jones, Johnathon 


382 




Jones, Kevin 


290 




Jones, Kristen 


216, 217 




Jones, L. 


244 




Jones, Mike 


279 




Jones. Temetra 


382 




Joo, Se 


382 




Jordan, Matthew 


289, 382 




Jorgenson, Jennifer 


306 




Joseph, Saramma 


382 




Joshi, Binal 


347 




Joshi, Sanjay 


277, 382 




Joven, John 


57 




Jovic. Rado 


382 




Joyce, Eric 


287 




.luan, Jeffrey O. 


382 




Judd, K, 


294 


) 


Judge, M. 


240 


' 


Juliusson, Candace 


277 




Jung, Cathleen 


253. 313, 382 




Jungheim, Emily 


311 




Junkas. Jeff 


382 




Junkus, S. 


269 




Jurek, Jeremy 


267 






Jurgena. Nathan 


147 


244 


Jurgens. B. 


252 


338 


Justice, Andy 


280 


267 


Justice, Jenna 


382 


139 


Justice, Paul 


290 


326 


Justin, Carrie 


243 


209 






250 




^^^^^^ 


144 




JttJI^Kt^^ 


284 




^^^^T 


311 


Kabat. Yvonne 


^^K^ 310 


108 


Kacmarcik, Tara 


^^^^ 382 


252 


Kaczmarcz\'k. Paul 


^^^^^^^ 287 


306 


Kaczmarowski, Ros 


emary^^^^^^^ 112 






17 President Clinton's Whitewater partners, along with Arkansas Governor Guy Tucker, were indicted on fraud conspiracy 
charges. 

18 The United Nations suspended an arms embargo on Rwanda for one year. If no major problems arose during the suspension, 
then it will be lifted permanently. 

20 Shannon Faulkner decided to drop out of The Citadel only one week after enrolling. 

23 President Clinton consoled the families of diplomats who were killed in Bosnia. He called the victims "quiet heroes." 

28 Bomb threats closed New York's three major airports for more than an hour, delaying all flights. 



Index 



431 



r 



R 



15 



The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum opened up to thunderous cheers in Cleveland. Jimi Hendrix's acid-tinged ren- 
dition of the "Star Spangled Banner" opened up the ceremony. 

Baltimore Oriole Cal Ripken Jr. played in his 2,131st baseball game, surpassing Lou Gehrig's iron-man record. At the interna- 
tional women's conference in Beijing, Hillary Clinton criticized China for seeking to limit free and open discussion of 
women's issues — the most forceful speech on human rights that any American dignitary had ever given on Chinese soil. 

Senior American officials announced that NATO officials broadened and intensified the air campaign in Bosnia after three 
days of bombing failed to persuade the Bosnian Serbs to lift the siege of Sarajevo. 

The women's world conference in Beijing declared for the first time in a United Nations document that women "had the rig}- 
in say no" — the right to make sexual decisions free of coercion or violence. 

\ band cjf Senate Republicans dealt party conservatives a stunning defeat when they stripped a provision from a welfare 
reform bill which denied benefits from women who have additional children while on puolic welfare. 

Jack Kevorkian wore homemade socks and a ball and chain to his arraignment on assisted suicide charges of a Pontiac, 
iVIich., woman. He was innocent. 

U.S. officials announced that Bosnian Serbs had agreed to withdraw their heavy guns out of firing range of Sarajevo, tem- 
porarily ending NATO's bombing campaign against the Serbs. 



Kahan, Corrie 


239 


382 


Keller, Amy 


243, 316 


382 


IGng, B. 


230 


Kobilca, Lisa 


269, 383 


Kahn, Missy 




239 


Keller, J. 




263 


King, Brian 


283 


Koca, Julie 


236, 383 


Kairys, Candy 




326 


Keller, Jeffrey 


263 


382 


King, Gerry 


277, 325 


Kocalis, A. 


257 


Kaiser. A. 




294 


Keller, Jennifer 




113 


King, LaShawn 


338 


Kocalis. C. 


257 


Kaiser, Amanda 




271 


Kelley, Dennis 




382 


King, M. 


278 


Koch, A. 


244 


Kai.ser, D. 




348 


Kelley, Matt 




280 


King, Rob 


383 


Koch, Gregory 


230, 277, 38? 


Kaiser, Derricl< 




241 


Kellogg, Matt 


312 


316 


Kingsbury, Julia 


383 


Koch, K, 


252 


Kaiser, Jeff 




382 


Kellogg, Tim 


312 


382 


Kinneman, E. 


253 


Koch, M, 


24C 


Kaiser, Shane 




332 


Kelly, Beth 




382 


Kinney, D, 


291 


Koch, Sheryl 


243, 38J 


Kalaher, Chad 




382 


Kellv, Chris 




382 


Kinney, J'ne 


253 


Kochanek, T 


26'5 


Kalina, Brian 




382 


Kelly, Kelly 




382 


Kinney, Karen 


383 


Kochanowicz, Chris 


26; 


Kalinowski, Aaron 




382 


Kelly, Martin 




293 


Kinsley, Joshua 


383 


Koebl, Sean 


28S 


Kalish, C. 




251 


Kellv, Mary 




383 


Kipka, Michelle 


383 


Koehn, J. 


331 


Kalish, Christopher 


330 


382 


Kelly, Michael 




383 


ICirby, Kevin 


260 


Koenig, Andrea 


181 


Kalivas, S. 




331 


Kelly, Mike 




293 


Kirchner, M, 


244 


Koepel, Ann 


38: 


Kallal, Chris 




238 


Kelmachter, Heather 


239, 342, 346 


383 


Kiriluk, C. 


257 


Koers, Marko 


171, 210, 211 


Kallmann, Kathleen 


146 


382 


Kemmis, S. 




275 


Kirkwood, Allen C, 


383 


Koerte, J, 


34f 


Kallstrom, M. 




244 


Kemnar, L. 




278 


Kirsche, Alisa 


239 


Koerwitz, Chris 


15( 


Kalseth, K. 




253 


Kemp, L, 




250 


Kirts, Rhonda 


342 


Kofahl, Drew 


282, 38; 


Kaminecki, Jodi 




271 


Kempa, S. 




264 


Kirtzic, Steve 


291 


Koffler, Robert 


38; 


Kamis, Robert 




382 


Kempel, Joshua 




238 


Kiss, K. 


275 


Kogan, Jill 


302, 303, 38; 


Kamp, S. 




244 


Kendregan, Sherry 




383 


Kiss, Steven 


281 


Kohlbacher, Kelly 


271, 38; 


Kan, Geegee 


321 


327 


Kennedy, Cam 




291 


Klamrzynski, Heather 


383 


Kohnke, Jo Anna 


266, 38; 


Kanabay, Robert 


260, 308 


382 


Kennedy, Lisa 




75 


Klappauf, Laurel 


383 


Kok-Alblas, K. 


26< 


Kanani, Shilpa 


269 


382 


Kennedy, M. 




331 


Klapper, Jessica 


217 


Kolaz, Krista 


33- 


Kanaris, J, 




240 


Kennedy, Ryan 




280 


JClarman, Lori 


383 


Kolb, Deborah 


38; 


Kane, Amy 




382 


Kennedy, Scott 




289 


Klaus, Gavin 


293 


Kolhase, C. 


29' 


Kane, Clinton 




382 


Kennelly. Darin 




276 


Klaus, Paul F. 


284, 383 


Kolman, Kim 


311 


Kang, Mimi 




271 


Kenner, Emily 


331 


383 


Klayman, T. 


278 


Kolososki, Kerry 


116, 27' 


Kania, Edyta 




382 


Kennesey, Christopher 




242 


Kleckler, Barry 


87 


Kong, Avery 


38; 


Kanke, T. 




331 


Kenny, Thomas M 




383 


Kleeftsch, N. 


266 


Konrath, Lisa 


331, 33- 


Kao, Teresa 




321 


Kenon, Dee Angela 




383 


Kleemann, Neal 


279 


Konsoer, K. 


25' 


Kapellen, M. 




246 


Keough, C. 




257 


Klein, Abigail 


383 


Konstanty, Steven 


27( 


Kapernekes, T. 




250 


Kern, Andrew 




242 


Klein, J. 


294 


Koob, P, 


33' 


Kapinus. T. 




263 


Kernan, Ian Patrick 




273 


Klein, John 


383, 284 


Koonce, Shane 


23' 


Kaplan. Robin 




239 


Kerns, Carrie 




311 


Klein, Julie 


298 


Kopay, R. 


24t 


Kapoor. John 




382 


Kerouac, Renee 




243 


Klein, Natasha 


277 


Kordash, L. 


29' 


Kapp, John 




382 


Kerrigan, John 




383 


Kleinkemper, Michael 


383 


Kordash. S. 


29-' 


Kapsimalis, G. 




252 


Kerrigan, T 




269 


Klensch, Nicholas 


282 


Kordel, Bonnie 


r 


Karawan, Greg 




287 


Kesman, Amy 




243 


Klepper, Jill 


269, 383 


Korosa, K. 


240 


Karchmar, Becky 




271 


Kessler, K. 




252 


Klepper, Shari 


281, 383 


Korose, Christopher 


381 


Kardatzke, Daniel 




382 


Kessler, Kimberly 




383 


Klien, Kelli 


243 


Korte, J. 


27: 


Karmazin, Karen 


221 


348 


Kessler, Sharon 




383 


Klima, Matt 


211 


Kortkamp, Andy 


20: 


Karmel. Anil 




382 


Kesterke, Michelle 


248 


383 


Klimek, Josh 


206 


Korzen, Carol 


38^ 


Karp. .Michele 




382 


Ketay, Debi 




285 


Klimenko, K. 


252 


Kosanke. Dave 


13 


Karth, Matt 




382 


Kettell, Allison 




383 


Klimes, Sarah 


264, 300, 383 


Koskan, E. 


25 


Karuschek, A. 




264 


Key, Chantelle 




334 


Kline, Cameron 


383 


Kosowski, Glen 


24 


PCanelis, Julie 


243 


382 


Khazaeli, J. 




263 


Kline, Kevin 


146 


Koss, Serra 


38 


Kasalko. Jeff 




241 


Khile, J. 




331 


Klintworth, S. 


278 


Kostenly, Kristine 


31' 


Kashi, A.saf 




382 


Khorshid, A. 




331 


Klinzing, Josh 


310 


Koszur, Ben 


29 


Kasper, Kdward 


176, 250 


382 


Khoury, Linda 




383 


Klisiewicz, Tom 


383 


Koszyk, Jennifer 


269, 298, 33- 


Katcher, S. 




266 


Kiaschko, J. 




275 


Klobnak, Robert 


383 


Kot. Robert 


38 


Kat.saros, S. 




349 


Kibbons, Katie 




240 


Klopfeastein, Peter 


383 


Kothari, Chevon 


12; 


Katz, Amy 


239, 332 


382 


Kidd, Ane 




340 


Klymkowych. Romana 


383 


Kotowski, Brian 


29 


Katz, Stephanie 




239 


Kidd, N. 




264 


Knabjian, Denise 


383 


Kotowski, Cory 


24 


Katznelson, Scott 




382 


Kiep, Brian 




241 


Knapp, A. 


257 


Kotsovetis, N. 


24 


Kaufman, Nate 




261 


Kiesler, J. 




269 


Knapp, Christopher 


383 


Koulis, Helen 


25 


Kaufman, Ryan 




382 


Kie.sowitch, Mike 




291 


Knapp, Dan 


261 


Kourelis, D. 


25 


Kaur, Adam 


289 


382 


Kietzman, Brenda 


338 


383 


Knapp, Jeff 


260 


Kovacexich, And>' 


29 


Kawada, Jodi 


253 


313 


Kilburg, Aaron 




383 


Kneer, Jeffrey 


383 


Ko\'ach. T. 


26 


Kawanaka, S. 




266 


Killian, M. 




331 


Kneifel, Josh 


260 


Kovarik. ,\my 


.W 


Kay, Lisa 


349 


382 


Kilmczak, Melissa 




327 


Knight, K. 


252 


Kozak, Jenette 


310, .^8 


Keane, Carrie 


271 


402 


Kim, E. 




252 


Knight, Matthew 


283 


Kozanecki, Kaya 


.^8 


Keane. Jim 




293 


Kim. Edwin 




327 


Knight, Natasha 


310 


Kozdran, Beckey 


24 


Kcancy, M, 




349 


Kim, Ellie 




327 


Knight, Robert 


40 


Kozeli.sk i, Kri.sten 


25", .<H 


Kearney, J. 




264 


Kim, Geanie 




383 


Knittle, L, 


275 


Kozlowski, ChriMopher 


.322, ,<8 


Kearney, I.. 




264 


Kim, Joe 




327 


Knod, Adam 


383 


Kozlowski, Deiek 


2(> 


Keefe, Amy 




276 


Kim, Joyce 




383 


Knodle, ,Slevc 


2.37 


Kraomer, biurie 


2.W, .« 


Keegan, Ryan 




293 


Kim, Peter 




383 


Knuckey, Michelle 


243 


Kniot.sch, Neil 


34 


Kccnan, Pal 




293 


Kim, Regina 




311 


Kiiudson, II. 


278 


Knii.ss, Kalherine 


1-2, 17 


Kfhoe, Ali,son 




271 


Kim, Sharon 




327 


Kiiulson, A. 


2"'5 


Knijecki, I..uira 


244, 298, .^4 


Kell, Nicholas 


282 


'iH2 


Kirn, Sun 




.362 


Kn. Sun K\ung 


383 


Kr.i|ecki, Su.s.ui 


.^ 



432 



INDEX 



ramarow. Dmitry 
ramer, A. 
ramer, Jen 
Iramer, K. 
ramer, Steve 
ranz, Jill 
rause, Rebecca 
raut, Tre 
regel, Matthew 
reibich. Jay 
reiger, R. 
reloft'. Lori 
remer, Sharon 
remer, Thomas 
remper, Jacqiielyn 
ress. Nathan 
retschimer. Allison 
retschmer. Eric 
rettek, Joel 
retz, David 
retzer, T. 
reiitzer, J. 
rever, Jeff 
rieger, Rebecca 
riegler. Ktirt 
rise!. B. 
■ish, P, 
Iristan. K. 
ristof. Thomas 
rilenbrink, John 
irohn, N. 
rolicki, John 
rolikowski, Kari 
roll. Chris 
ropp, D. 
row lak, Monica 
1 liefer. Jeffrey 
rueger, Kristopher 
aimdick, Kara 
rzeniinski, James 
ucek, Klaudia 
ticliarczyk, Suzanne 
uchenthal, William 
uchipudi, D. 
uchnicki, Brian 
Licik, M. 
udenholdt, Kris 
uebel, Amy 
iihl, Chris 
Lihn, Heather 
Lihn. Kevin 
ula, C. 
ulemeier, A. 
ulpins, Mark 
umar, L. 
unath, Traci 
luncl, James 
unkle, David 
uppsuwami, Sivaraja 
urian. Ann 
tirpila, S. 
iirlh. J. 

iiirth. Jennifer 
urth. K. 
iish 1.. 

usli.id, Mosbah 
Msicr, B, 
iisicr, Sara 
u/nitsky, Stacy 
\\ .in, Sui Yan 
\\ I1--1 mski, C. 
yro, E. 



292 
263 
239 
244 
283 
386 
386 
261 
332 
386 
275 
239 
386 
386 
386 
237 

269, 386 
386 
285 
386 
294 
275 
292 
311 
386 
349 
269 
240 

309. 386 
290 
253 
386 
386 
324 
257 
70, 95 
386 
386 

338, 386 
293 

331, 386 

386, 412 
386 
244 
290 
246 

300, 301 
338 
260 
271 
292 
264 
246 
386 
275 
386 

273, 386 
386 
342 
327 
294 
278 
386 
246 
269 
332 
255 
386 
338 
386 
269 
246 




I'aul Grant 



Silvana D. Marzullo and Julie M. Rihani 



Labahn, S. 
Labowicz, Anna 
LaCasha, Patricia 
Lacey. R. 
Lach-Seiple. Ryai 
Lachcik, Pam 
LaCrosse. Tiai 
Lacy, Jo-El 
Ladgenski, D. 
LaDuca, Bri.in 
Lai, Jane 
Lakamp, Doug 
Lake. Chri.stopher 




271, 



349 


Lakoniiak, Neil 


271 


Lam, Darlene 


386 


Lam, Vi 


255 


Lamb, Courtney 


289 


Lamb, lennifer 


175 


Lamb, John 


386 


Lamb, T. 


386 


Lamb, Tricia 


251 


Lambe, Maureen 


289 


Lambert, J. 


386 


Lambo, Kristine L 


237 


Lamkey, Jason 


386 


Lamkin, Colin 



292 
386 
262 
171 
243 
386 
240 
327 
252 
266 
281 
386 
36 



LaMonica. Donald 
LaMotte, Renee 
Land, Su.sanne 
I.andauer, Martin J. 
Landauer. Michael 
Landeck. A. 
Landron. Danielle 
Lane, Bill 
Lane. Dan 
Lane. John 
Lang. M. 
Lang. Stephen 
Lang. Tan'n 
l.angdon. J. 
l.angefeld. Brett 
Langer. Patricia 
Langer. Stefanie 
Langer, T. 
Langfeld, S. 
Langley. Sara 
Lanie, Mark 
Lanning, A. 
Lapetina, K. 
l.aPona, M. 
Lara. Veronica 
Larican. M, 
Larsen, J, 
Larsen. Julie 
Larsen, Julie Ann 
Larson, Benji 
Larson, D. 
Larson. Danelle 
Larson, J. 
Larson, Scott 
Larson, Sheri 
Lash, Susan 
I.askey, Joseph 
l.asky, K. 
I.asser, J 
l.athilham. Dan 
Latimer, Chns 
l.atshaw, J. 
Lattanzio. Brenda 
Laudeman, J. 
Laurinaitis, K. 
Laurvick, Brett 
Laiischke. David 
Laux. T. 
Laverty, P. 
Lavery, Darin 
Lavin, Amy 
Lawler, Wendy 
Lawlor, Bill 

Lawrence, Christopher 
Lawrence. Rick 
Lawrence, Terry 
layne, Doug 
Lean, Matthew Mac 
Lease, Christine 
Leavitt, Jen 
Lebahn, Steve 
Lebo, L. 
Lechner. A. 
Lechner. Katie 
Lechner. V. 
Lechowicz, Laura 
Lechwar. K. 
LeClaire, Aimee 
Leddell, Courtney 
Leddy. Joe 
Lee, A. 
Lee, Ann 



386 
386 
217 
284 
386 
269 
290 
58 
237 
284 
253 
237 

285, 386 
255 
287 
386 
79, 335 
269 
257 

240, 338 
289 
257 
253 
252 
25 
331 
349 
326 
333, 338, 386 
242 
255 
386 

246, 264 
262 
386 
271 
386 
264 

294, 348 
326 
386 
246 

271, 402 
240 
252 
207 
310 
294 
278 
386 
253 
321 
386 

291, 386 
241, 302, 304 
386 
175 
242 
386 
239 

241 

252 
269 
338 
269 
252 
252 
386 
386 
292 
264 
386 



s 

E 
P 
T 
E 
VI 
B 
E 
R 



21 United Nations and NATO officials announced that Bosnian Serb forces had removed their heavy weapons from positions 
around Sarajevo, and that NATO planes would not resume bombing attacks against them. 

22 The House voted overwhelmingly to tighten the trade embargo against Cuba despite last-minute threats of a veto by the 
White House. 

23 Health experts reported that dengue fever, a debilitating disease transmitted by mosquitoes, had now reached epidemic pro- 
portions in Central AiTierica and was bearing down on the United States — after its virtual eradication in the Western 
Hemisphere. 

27 The U.S. Treasury Department announced a facelift to the $100 bill. Ben Franklin's face will be enlarged and moved to the 
left, the ink will change from green to black and a translucent thread will glow imder light. 

29 The Simpson murder case was finally sent to the jury after nine months of testimony, 

30 Republicans scored a major victoiy as the Senate Finance Committee approved their plan to make immense changes in 
Medicaid and Medicare plans. 



Index 



433 



il 



c 

B 
E 
R 



8 
9 

10 



Sheik Omar Abdel Rahman and nine of his radical Islam followers were found guilty of conspiring to bomb New York City 
landmarks and assassinations of political leaders in an effort to "wage a war of urban terrorism against the U.S." Britain went 
metric, and authorities euphemistically proclaimed it to be "M-Day". Despite going the metric route, some would not yield 
an inch. 

O.J. Simpson was proclaimed "Not Guilty" of murder charges and released from court custody. This was one of the biggest 
decisions in U.S. history. 

! he U.N. celebrated its 50th birthday in New York by challenging the world's rich nations to assist the poor nations. 

l5osnia's warring parties agreed to a cease-fire to be followed by negotiations in the United States that would ultimately lead 
to a full international peace conference. 

Wildfires stmck northern California burning about 12,300 acres of scenic woods and brush. 

Six people were killed and 30 others were injured when Bosnian Serbs dropped a cluster bomb into a crowded refugee 
camp two days before a Bosnian cease-fire was set to take effect. 

A powerful earthquake hit the Pacific coast of Mexico, killing at least 34 people and injuring at least 100. Hundreds of home 
were destroyed. 



Lee. C. 




244 


Lewis, T. 




255 


Loggie, N. 




275 


Mackay. Peter 


302, 303 


Lee. Ching Wen 




386 


Lewsader, A. 




253 


Logsdon. Jason 


237, 


312 


Mackie, Kit 


293 


Lee. Craig 


237 


386 


Ley. Roben A. 


292 


388 


Lolans, Karen 




388 


Madej, Steve 


293 


Lee. Drew 




290 


Lezak, Melissa 


285 


388 


Long, Thomas 




388 


Madison. Darcy 


388 


Lee. Eugene 




51 


Li, J. 




349 


Longawa. Jennifer 




129 


Madoch, Kerry 


264, 388 


Lee, Fleur 




326 


Li, Tao 




388 


Longoria, T 




244 


Madsen, Casey 


34 


Lee, Henry 




386 


Liang, Chih 


138 


381 


Lonze, Julie 


243, 


388 


Maeder, Mike 


178 


Lee, J. 


264 


278 


Libman, Rachel 




239 


Lopez, Angel 


7 


,99 


Maenche, Mark 


276 


Lee, Jane 




386 


Lichner, C. 




244 


Lopez, Christine M. 




249 


Mafee, Rana 


389 


Lee, Jennie 




338 


Lidinsky, Kelly 


266 


311 


Lopez, Jose 




285 


Magana. Gilgardo 


285 


Lee, Joseph 




289 


Liebman, C. 




250 


Lord, M. 




240 


Magee, Rebecca 


264. 389 


Lee. Joyce 


333 


338 


Liebman, P. 




349 


Lorden. A. 




278 


Mager, Christopher 


389 


Lee, Matt 




262 


Liebovich, Cynthia A. 




388 


Lorenc, Jana 




388 


Maggio, J. 


284 


Lee, Melissa 




386 


Liem, Wan Ching 




388 


Lorenz, K. 




278 


Mahannah, Kari 


276 


Lee. Nakia 




386 


Liermann, Kelle 


244 


388 


Lores, J. 




253 


Mahrer, S. 


240 


Lee, Paul 




386 


Lies, K. 




246 


Lotz, E. 




275 


Maier, Jonathan 


389 


Lee, Robert 




386 


Lieyos, Mark 




242 


Lowenstein, Wendy 




243 


Mainstay, Daniel 


85 


Lee, Robert E. 




281 


Lifshin, Jen 




239 


Loyola, Irwin 




388 


Majerczak, Victoria 


389 


Lee, S. 




294 


Lillig, Karrie-Lynn 




388 


Lozano, Sandra 




334 


Major, J. 


349 


Lee, Scott 




276 


Lim, Chan 




242 


Lu, Sheowting 


302 


303 


Ma joy, Rob 


159 


Lee, Susie 




334 


Lim, Margaret 




388 


Lubawski, K. 




244 


Majumdar. Anonya 


249 


Lee, Thomas 


381 


386 


Limon, Julie 


311 


388 


Luby, M. 




264 


Mak, Jennifer 


389 


Lefler, Tricia 




243 


Lin, Dave 




242 


Lucas, S. 




253 


Maki, E. 


348 


Leguizamon, Michael 




287 


Lin, Edward 




388 


Lucas, Sarah 


248 


388 


Makris, C. 


257 


Leheney. M. 




331 


Lin. Jet-Sun 


140 


325 


Lucie. M. 




246 


Malacina, Gary 


389 


Lehman, Maryn 




388 


Lin. Kwong Shing 




388 


Luebbers. Julie 


79 


335 


Malec. J. 


246 


Lehmann, Janelle 


255 


320 


Lin, Michelle 




348 


Lufkin. Melissa 


243 


388 


Malec, Sheri 


269, 298 


Lehn, Brian 


283 


316 


Lin. S. 




278 


Lugo, Chris 




261 


Malik, Faiza. 


389 


Leiner, C. 




252 


Lin, Sharon 




249 


Lukach, George 




237 


Malitech, Anton 


261 


Leipold, Sheryl 




388 


Lind, Suzanne 




327 


Lukas, Rimas 




260 


Malone, Donna D. 


38S 


Leitch. Will 


300, 301 


336 


Lindahl. Jeremy 




388 


Lukasik. L. 




278 


Malone, Kay 


389 


Leitner, Dave 




315 


Lindberg, Sara 




388 


Lundberg, K. 




252 


Malone. Le,slie 


33? 


Leli. Matt 




290 


Lindeman, Angela 




388 


Lundquist, Amy 




276 


Maloney, Amy 


332. 389 


Lemmon, Shandi 




388 


Linden A. 




331 


Luong, Vi 




388 


Maloney, J. 


25- 


Lemon. Kate 




277 


Linderman, Marcy 




239 


Lurie. Dave 




335 


Maloney, Sheila 


310 


Lemperis, J. 




257 


Lindgren, K. 




257 


Lustfeldt, C. 




275 


Malstrom, Rob 


242 


Lemperis. P. 




257 


Lindqui.st, Jason 




388 


Luzbetak, Paul 




388 


Manalo, Jennifer 


32- 


Lenci. J. 




294 


Lindwedel. A. 




294 


Lyall, Ma.son 


332 


388 


Mancine, Dominick 


389 


Lennington, Eric 




388 


Lines. Janice 




113 


Lyda, Judy 


269 


388 


Manderino. Michael 


389 


Lennon. Tim 




260 


Linett, K. 




275 


Lykins, Nick 




320 


Mandl. Jennifer 


389 


Lenthe, K. 




294 


Linhart, B. 




266 


Lyle, Duane 




157 


Mandzukic, V. 


253 


Leon, Jennifer 




388 


Link. Aaron 




289 


Lyman, Ellen 




388 


Mangano, Lisa 


246, 331. 385 


Leone, J. 




269 


Lipinski, S. 




349 


Lynch, Andy 




293 


Mangurten, Brad 


389 


Leone, Jill 




335 


Lipitz, Stacey 




239 


Lynch. B, 




253 


Mangurten, Erin 


235 


Leong, Clement 




388 


Lipke, Karey 




300 


Lynch, K. 




255 


Maning, Derek 


276 


Leopold, S. 




278 


Lipkie, Steven 




388 


Lynch, Kelli 


313 


388 


Mann, Jennifer 


239. 389 


Lerner. Mica 




277 


Lipman, S. 




266 


Lynch. Kennda 




310 


Mann. Jessica 


389 


Leroy. Nick 




287 


Lip.sey. Z.sa'Marcia 




388 


Lynch, Peter 




292 


Mann. Pai.il 


284 


I,e.sak, D. 




253 


Lipsky, Matthew 




388 


Lynch, Stacey 




388 


Mann, Ru.sty 


31ft 


Lesak. R. 




253 


Liter, Caris.sa 


275 


388 


Lynch, Tom 




59 


Manning, Mickey 


24.1 


Le.slie, Erin 




388 


Litherland. Noah 




284 


Lynn, Lori 




326 


Manning, S. 


25- 


Lester, K. 




255 


Little. Joy 




388 


Lynne, David 




388 


Manpearl. David 


215 


Lesters, K. 




348 


Liu. Hsiu Fen 




388 


Lyons. Matt 




261 


Manson. Monica 


4*: 


listers, Kris 




243 


Liu, Jasper 




388 


Lyons, S. 




269 


Maasukhani. Anil 


261. 304. 331.38? 


Let.sos, John 




388 


Liu. Taifen Wendy 




388 








Mao. Jun 


330, 389 


U-iwat. Jay 




388 


Lively. M. 




244 








Marana, Drew 


276 


Leubbers. Julie 




335 


Living.ston, John 




388 








Marble, Jen 


278, 31.' 


Ix;ucking, I'. 




251 


Lizio, N. 




278 


Ma, K. ^^ 


^^^^ 


^294 


March, Sarah 


385 


Ix;ung, Ja.son J. 




388 


Lloyd, Matthew 


283, 342 


388 


Victor^^^^^^^^^^^^ 


^^^1 


^8 


Marchan, Saul 


28= 


lx:vic. Heather 




239 


Lloyd, Sherie 




388 


MaacETK. '"V^^^^^f 




"» 


Marchiori. Jamie 


344 


Levin, Uarryl 




388 


Lo, Hsin-H.sin 




.388 


.Maasbet]!, T ^^^^^B 




25^ 


Marcotte. Dana 


385 


Levin, J. 




253 


l.o. Joyce 




327 


.Mabilanf?an R<x1k^^^^ 


327 


38b 


Marcus. Michelle 


385 


Ix-vin, Slaci 




239 


l.o, Ronald 




388 


.Mabrey, Ti.u i 




3RK 


Marev. Penny 


385 


Levina, Marina 




298 


Lobos, Mark 




282 


M.icalu.so, Mk h.Lcl ^^^__ 




,VS,S 


M.irguetis, Andrew 


242 


Levjne, Abbey 




239 


Loca.scio, B. 


250.331 


M.icapugay, l.iygee 


.^01) 


388 


Marine, Jenny 


172, 17.' 


Levy, D 




349 


Loccasio, G. 




275 


M,ic...ii, 1 




2»i 


Marino, Tricia 


.<42, 385 


lx"wand<)wskl, J, 




253 


Locke. J. 




244 


MacDon.ild, Buiiiiic 


243 


298 


Markin, Shane M. 


281 


Ix-wcnsky, Linda 




388 


Lockharl, Isiah 


48 


299 


Macek, T, 




294 


Maikos. D. 


264 


U-wis, A. 




244 


I.(H kwood. Douglas R. 




281 


Macliailo, L, 




2l() 


Marlowe. M. 


2W 


Uwj.s, R. 




263 


Lodwic k, Mark 




280 


Machalka. Mark 




388 


Mamifo. M 


251 


Lcwi.s. J, 




275 


Lofihl. \-.iu.i 




175 


Macias. Greg 




293 


Marsh. D.irren 


.W 


l,ewi», Kcnee 


285 


3HH 


Logan. ('.. 




253 


Maclnlyie. Andrew 




2-U 


Marsh. J 


24( 



i 



434 



INDEIX 



Our hats 
are off to you. 





Congratulations. We're glad to be with 
you at this special occasion. . . and so many 
other occasions you might not be aware of. 

Did you know that the average aircraft 
has 60 AlliedSignal components aboard, 
ranging from automatic pilots to climate 
control systems? Our Bendix® brakes, 
FRAM® filters and Autolite® spark plugs are 



among the world's leading automotive 
brands. And our carpet fibers, refrigerants 
and fabrics add comfort to your life. 

Our 85,000 employees in 40 countries 
would like you to know more about us. 
Write AlliedSignal Inc., P.O. Box 2245, 
Morristown, New Jersey 07962. 



^IliedSignal 



Advertisements 



435 



IL 



■^ugeHjnXOB^fflgj^ 



Contributing to the tradition of excellence and architecture 

at the University of Illinois, 




L 



Hitchcock 
Design Group 



Bielfeldt Athletic Administration Building 

O'Donnell 
Wicklund 
Pigozzi and 
Peterson 



OWP&P 



on Robert G. 
Burkhardt 



Landscape Architects 
Land Planners 

221 West Jefferson 
Naperville, IL 60540 
708-961-1787 
708-961-9925 Fax 



Architects 
Incorporated 

570 Lake Cook Road 
Deerfield, IL 60015 
847-940-9600 
847-940-9601 Fax 



and Associates, Inc. 
Consulting Engineers 

59 East Van Buren St. 
Chicago, IL 60605 
312-341-9292 
312-341-9263 Fax 




^/^ 



\ 



% 






Proud to be part of the continuous 

growth of the 

University of Illinois 



4003 Kearns Drive • Champaign, IL 61821 
Telephone (217) 359-3333 • Fax (217) 355-0449 



Proud to Continue our 

Partnership with the 

University of Illinois, 

Capitol Development Board, 

and the Gilbane Building Company 

on the 

Iflfv Library Facility 

and 



THE LEVY COMPANY 

3925 COMMERCIAL AVENUE 

NORTHBROOK, ILLINOIS 60062 

Phone: (847) 564-8950 Fax: (847) 564-2987 ^TlevTcT 

' Acoustical Ceilings • Carpentry • Drywall • EIFS • Painting • Plastering ' 

AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 



a 



436 ADVERTISEMENTS 



I 



vlarsli, Jennifer 


240 


389 


vlarsh, Nathan 




237 


vlarshack, Sara 




216 


Marshall, K. 




253 


Marshall, I.inclsey 
vlarshall, I'al 




243 




170 


vlarshfield, Lisa 




389 


[vlarten. Brad 




237 


iVlarti, Ci, 




252 


vl;irtin, Anthony 




299 


\l,iitin, Dan St. 




280 


vl.niin. Ja.son 


261 


389 


il.iitin, Jeff 




206 


\l,iitin, K. 




252 


\i.iiiin, Lora 




389 


vljiiin, Patrick 




175 


\laiiin. Stacia 




338 


Vlartin-Ruiz. Beatriz 




389 


'Martinez. A. 




264 


U. Ill Inez, .Mark 




285 


M.irlinez, S. 




253 


\l.i(ii>n. Heather 




389 


\l,iii\. Chris 




300 


\l.niicco, G. 




294 


\l,ii\, Christopher 




389 


M.islowski, Kristen 




316 


M.ison, Thomas 




389 


M.iMin, William 




389 


vlassey, Michelle 
i/Iassucci, Matt 
vla.strangeli, S. 


276 


389 


309, 310, 389 


342 




331 


Vlastrangeli, Susan 
Vlateja, Mike 




310 




260 


vlaterna, Gregory 




282 


Vlatlier, Marianne 




389 


Vlathew, Thomas 




389 


Mathews, Sarah 
Vlathieson, Christie 




252 


10, 253, 313 


316 


Vlathon, Ammie 


294 


389 


Matlock. L. 
Vlatousek, K. 




275 




264 


Matthew, S. 




331 


Matthew, Trommer 




404 


Vlatthews. Jessica 




389 


Vlattila, Matt 




291 


Matts, Carrie 




389 


Matusiak, Paul 




287 


Vlaul, Su.san 




326 


Vlaulding. Russel 




332 


Maurer, Erik 




389 


Vlavros, Dana 


271 


389 


Ma.xey, Jr. Cecil 




389 


Ma.xwel'l, A. 




264 


\I,i\ , A. 




253 



\Li\. K. 
\l,i\ Kimberly 
\|.i\. .M. 

M,i\ lierry, Tanya 
M.uer. Joanne 
\l,i/iarz, R. 
\l,i. III', Daniel 
\l.i//occo, Michael A. 
MiAleenan, B. 
\Ie,\leenan, Brendan 
jVlcAloon, Elizabeth 
VIcAnelly. Nealy 
VIcAughtry, C. 
VIcBride, Rebecca 
\I. Cabe, E. 
\l. I'.iffrey, D. 
\U I aleb, Kristen 
iMcCaniel, K. 



246, 331 



240 
240, 389 
349 
276 
389 
331 
389 
320 
263 
263 
389 
389 
240 
142 
244 
290 
389 
253 




Paul Grano 



Tom Peroulas 



McCarter, .\ 
McCarthy, Ali.son 
McCarthy, E. 
McCarthy. Erin 
McCartney, A. 
McClain. Mark 
McCloskey, Brian 
McClowery, S. 
McClung, Deanna 
McClure, Brian 
McClusky, Amy 
McCollom. Patrick 
McConachie. Anuela 





2i() 


McCurmick, Heath 




243 


McCorquadate, M. 


246 


257 


McCoy, E. 




389 


McCully, Matt 




294 


McDaniel, A. 




241 


McDannel, Janeen 




60 


McDearmon, E. 




246 


McDermott, Pat 


257 


313 


McDonald, George 




206 


McDonald, K. 


, 300 


389 


McDonald, L. 




389 


McDonald, S. 




389 


McDonald. Sean 



284 
246 
275 
206 
252 
389 
246 
287 
157 
278 
257 
294 
284 



McDonald. Suzanne 
.VIcDonough, C. 
VIcDonough, Darren 
McDonough, H. 
McDonough, Heather 
•McDonough, Megan 
McDowell, Ali.son 
McEldowney, Mike 
McFarland, Jonathan 
McGee, Maiireen 
McGee, Misty 
.McGehie, A. 
McGill, T. 
McGillen, Matt 
McGinnis, A. 
McGinnis, Amy 
.VlcGivern, Lisa 
■VIcGowan, Heather 
McGowan, Nate 
McGrath, Ala.star 
McGrath, E. 
.McGrath. L 
McGrath. Laura 
McGrath, Lauren 
.McGrath. Marjorie 
.McGraw, Joseph 
.McGuire, Ellen 
McKay, A. 
.McKellar. Jim 
.McKendrick, Colleen 
McKeown, Jeff 
McKey, Josh 
McKiernan, Jen 
.McKini. Shawn 
McKinley, John 
McLaughlin, C. 
McLaughlin, D, 
McLaughlin. David 
McLaughlin, Diane M. 
McLaughlin. J. 
.McLaughlin. M. 
McLellan, Harold 
McLeod, Sarah 
McLevige, Leonard 
McLoughlin, James 
McMahan, K. 
McMahon, James 
McMahon, Pete 
Ml NLinus, Slephen 
Ml Millan, Kyle 
.McMiUon. Joy 
McNally, E. 
McNally, T. 
McNaught, Meredith 
McNeal, L. 
McNeela, K. 
McNutt, Enid 
.VIcOlgan, Lance 
McQuiggan, L. 
McTaggart, N, 
McVey, Eric 
McVey, T. 
McWuillan. M. 
Mead, Megan 
Mead, Michael A. 
Medaglia, T. 
Meder, Aaron 
Medernach, Jennifer 
Medina, Blance 
Medina. Gilberto 
Mednick, Lauren 
Meehah, Mimi 



389 
269 
211 
331 
334 
389 
389 
280 
389 
82 
389 
264 
264 
293 
252 
389 

243, 326 
243 
293 
389 
269 
275 
243 
129 
389 
390 

243. 390 
264 

301, 305 
390 
276 
313 
248 

284, 390 
178 
294 
264 
42 
390 
264 
278 
299 

253. 390 
390 
390 
246 
289 
390 
390 
237 
352 
278 
278 
390 
269 
331 

390 
241 
294 
257 
291 
253 
269 
243, 390 
390 
263 
241 
390 
252 
285 
239 
390 



o 
c 

T 
O 
B 
E 
R 



13 Despite being the first day of the latest cea.se-fii"e, fighting continued in northwest Bosnia where Bosnian and Serb forces bat- 
tled for strategic territory, 

14 The 1995 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Joseph Rotblat, a physicist who helped develop the atomic bomb but later led a 
campaign to eliminate iiLiclear weapons. 

16 Hundreds of thousands of black men marched in Washington D.C. during the "Million Man March," which was described as a 
"day of atonement" for African-American males, 

18 A new terrorist bomb ripped open a Paris commuter train, wounding 29 people and forcing France to confront yet again the 
domestic threat from political convulsions in Algeria, a former colony, 

19 France deployed hundreds of soldiers on the streets of Paris and warned any French citizens still in Algeria to leave after 
Islamic terrorists reportedly threatened further bombings. 

23 Presidents, kings and ministers from every continent gathered to salute the United Nations on its 50th birthday. 



437 







^5ge53a=^B§£fflcg 



01T0BAUM&S0NS,INC. 

CONCRETE • MASONRY • EXCAVATING 

CONTRACTORS 

Proud Partner 

Jn Construction 

With Zhe 

University 

Of 

Jllinois, 

Urbana-Champaign 




Tile Specialisty Inc. 

Proudly Supporting 

The 

University of Illinois 

In Their Pursuit 

Of Academic 

Excellence 




705 N. Country Fair Drive 

Chjimpaign, Illinois 61821 

217-359-1765 



"'V,^^f!>if;: 




Stobeck Masonry, Inc. 

P.O. Box 129 • Morton. IL 61550-0129 
(217) 8 77-3600 » Fax (217) 87 7-2981 

FkOUD MkMk 

in consmucTion 

/IT THE 



unimsirLDLiLLiQ 





FOX VALLEY 
PAINTING CO. 

Residential • Commercial • Industrial 
Parking Lot Striping • Vinyl Wall Covering • Sandblasting 




910 E. War Memorial Dr. 

Peoria Heights, IL 61614 

309-682-4277 



'.t;itfl?.miiiiiifi'!(i!^^ii!'. 



^jii.'im-iimmmmi^mM 




I 



Industrial *^** Commercial •**** Institutional 
Joe Saban, President 



P.O. Box 1432 • Champaign 
217-367-7455 



3180 N. Woodford • Decatur, IL 

217-877-7125 



438 Advertisements 



Meek, Jeremy 

Meeker, Lori 

Megginson, Amie 

Meidroth. Michael 

Meier, T. 

Meis. Ted 

Mei.s, Tim 
I Meisinger, C. 

Mei.ster, Keith 
I Meiam, Liz 
I Melanie, Ernsting 
I Melbye, Brandon 
I Melchi, Meghan 
I Melhart, Karen M. 

Mell. William 
I Melnick, B 

Melnick. Julie 

Melton, Adam D. 
' Memaster. S. 
I Menards, Trevor 
' Mendel.son, Jamie 
I Mendez, T. 
' Mendia, Leo 
I Mendoza, A. 
' Mendoza, Georgina 

Menet. Matt 
! Meng. Candice 

Menneke, E. 

Mennenga, J, 
' Mentel, J. 

Meredith, Laura 

Meredith, Robert 

Merod. Robert 

Mertens. Amysue 

Merz, M. 

Messinger, Mark 

Metes, Bill 

Metrick. Carrie 

Metzger, C. 

Metzl, M. 

Meydrech, Leigh 

Meyer, Betsy 
I Meyer, Brian 
; Meyer, E. 

Meyer, J. 

Meyer, Julie 

Meyer, K. 

Meyer. Katie 

Meyer, Megan 

Meyers, J. 

Meyers, Jaqueline 

Meyers. K. 

Meyers. Karl 

Meyers. Michael 

Mezei, O. 

Meznarsic, Michelle 

Michael, Patrick 

Michalczyk, D. 

Michalski. L, 

Michau, Lori 

Michau, S. 

Micheli. Daryl 

Michelini. Gereg 

Michonski. Christine 

Mies, Timothy 

Migawa. Mandy 

Miglin, Elizabeth 

Mihr, J. 

Milczarek, Wayne 

Miler, J. 

Milkereit, Eric 

Millar, Tony 



290 

255. 390 

271, 302 
390 
252 
283 
283 
275 
284 
239 
373 
390 
390 
390 
390 
331 
239 
284 
278 
242 
239 
244 
280 
278 
390 
308 

326, 327 
251 
240 
257 
390 
300 
390 

269, 390 
244 
390 
293 
134 
331 
257 
390 
125 

238, 390 
269 
294 
277 
240 
240 
243 
250 
390 
291 
211 
287 
278 
390 
390 
244 
264 
390 
250 
242 
310 

248, 390 
390 
390 

243, 390 
348 
282 
278 
390 
290 



Millas, Suzi 
MiUburger, Neil 
Miller, A. 
Miller, Alexander 
Miller, Amy 
Miller, Amy Louise 
Miller. Andrew 
Miller, C. 
Miller. Carrie 
Miller, Cathy 
Miller, Chad 
Miller, Cheryl 
Miller, Dan 
Miller, Erin 
Miller, J. 
Miller. Jeffrey 
Miller. Jim 
Miller. Karyn 
Miller. Kerri 
Miller. Kevin 
Miller. Kris 
Miller. L. 
Miller. Melissa 
Miller. Michael 
Miller, Michelle 
Miller, Mikki 
Miller. Otto 
Miller, S. 
Miller, T. 
Millerick, T, 
Milligan, Rebecca 
Millikan, Tim 
Millman, S. 
Mills, Scott 
Milner. Julie 
Milos, James 
Milsk. Susan 
Milton, Sarah 
Minarik, Julie 
Minch, Chris 
Minnerick, Matthew 
Minor, C. 
Minor, Leslie 
Minor, Paula 
Minor, Paula R 
Minster, L. 
Mirable, D. 
Mirco, J. 
Mirken, Marci 
Mirocha, Nathan 
Misener, Brian 
Mi.serendino, Peter 
Mishra, R. 
Misora. Robin 
Mitchell, Angela 
Mitchell, Gary 
Mitchell. M. 
Mitchell, P. 
Mitchell, Sarah 
Mitts, John 
Miyamoto, M. 
Mizanin, Marcus 
Mlacnik. Daniel 
Mlade. Lauren 
Mocek. Joan 
Modica. Matt 
Moe. Dorthy 
Moekler, Jamie 
Moen, Jeremy 
Moffitt. Justin 
Moglia. Laura 
Mohr. Mark 



306 


Mojica. Maureen 




276 


Muellen, M. 


264 


260 


Momon. C. 




253 


Mueller. Christopher 


284 


275 


Mondul. A. 




240 


Mueller. M. 


263 


390 


Moniotes. C. 




264 


Mueller. S. 


255 


390 


Monk. Kevin 




238 


Mueller. Suzanne 


391 


243 


Monkey, Dave 




242 


Mulcahy, Christopher 


391 


237 


Monks, Jeffrey 




390 


Mulcahy, Kourtney 


221, 348 


264 


Monnacewlla, Peter 




273 


Mulder, Sonia 


275. 391 


390 


Monohan, Brian 




293 


Mullarkey, A. 


278 


143 


Monroy. Victor 




391 


Mullin, Michelle 


391 


238 


Montague, Kevin 




293 


Muncy. Jason 


242 


390 


Montemayor, G. 




269 


Mundorff, S. 


266 


262 


Montez, Ben 




176 


Mundorff. Sherry 


347, 391 


300 


Moody. Jill 




243 


Mundzic, Jasmine 


391 


278 


Moody, Jim 




241 


Munson. Catherine 


244, 298, 352 


390 


Moomey. Christopher A. 




281 


Munson, Tyler 


391 


316 


Moore, A. 


255 


264 


Murphy. Erin 


276 


285 


Moore. Angela 


320 


391 


Murphy. Guinevere 


391 


243 


Moore, Dorothy 




391 


Murphy, Kim 


252 


260, 390 


Moore, Jonathan 




391 


Murphy, M. 


275, 349 


58 


Moore, Kristin 




243 


Murray. Julie 


391 


294 


Moore, L. 




275 


Murray, Maria 


326 


390 


Moore, Lisa 




72 


Murrin, Norm 


284 


390 


Moore. Mark 




391 


Mursu, K. 


269 


340 


Moore. Rebecca 




391 


Mushrush, Tammy 


391 


239 


Moore. Ryan 


158 


163 


Musick, William 


391 


293 


Moore. S. 




257 


Musur, Jeffrey 


391 


, 275, 331 


Moore, Shelley 




391 


Myalls, J. 


257 


275 


Moore, T. 




244 


Myers, M. 


331 


269 


Moore. Teresa 




391 






. 346, 390 


Morales, Elia 




249 






124 


Morales, Fernando 




285 






244 


Morales, Judith 




391 


Naatz, Beth ;l^ 


^^^ 246, 391 


330, 390 


Moran, Brain 




273 


Nabielet. Mark 


^^ 125 


390 


Moran. Brian 




391 


Nache. l.eticia 


^H 290 


262, 390 


Moran. Cheeks 




242 


Nacke, 1 


■ 331 


285 


Moran, T. 




263 


Nadler, Julie 


^H 285, 391 


390 


Morcos, Omar 




280 


Naggs, Kathleen 


^^■331, 391 


390 


Mordini, Katie 




239 


Nagle, Brian ^ 


^^^*- 391 


390 


Morel, Jan 




280 


Nagle. Mark 


292 


273 


Moritz, Steven 




65 


Nahnson. Erik 


391 


264 


Moriey, Charles G. 




281 


Nahumyk. Andy 


327,391 


390 


Moros, Terry 




289 


Nailor. Sheristen 


391 


174 


Morrell. Jenny 




271 


Nakayama. J. 


257 


390 


Morris, Allison 




239 


Nakayama. Naomi 


271 


294 


Morris, Jeremy 




237 


Nalbandian, L. 


294 


250 


Morris. K. 




269 


Nail, Jon 


391 


294 


Morris, Stephanie 




239 


Namordi, Eyal 


391 


239 


Morrison, K. 




246 


Nance. Stephanie 


271 


390 


Morrone. Anthony 




391 


Napolitano, Jason 


293 


390 


Morrone. Tony 




260 


Napora, D. 


244 


390 


Morrow, Mary 




391 


Nardulli, B. 


264 


349 


Morschauser, K. 




244 


Naretta, Alice 


367 


31 


Mosbarger, Mark 


283, 308, 391 


405 


Nashif. Marina 


391 


390 


Moscato. Sabrina 


327 


391 


Nation, Denise 


391 


287 


Moser. Dave 26. 63 


302, 303, 305 


391 


Nativi, A. 


252, 348 


240 


Mosher. Brian 




178 


Naughton. Eric 


271 


250 


Mosher. Shellie 




391 


Naul. Julie 


391 


175 


Moss. Heather 




391 


Nauman, Kirk 


260 


290 


Motley. Krista 




338 


Nava, Ramiro 


302, 304 


253 


Motohashi. Rieko 




391 


Nayfeh, Ha.san 


391 


390 


Motz. M. 




253 


Nazario. Teresa 


290 


90, 324 


Moulden. Megan 




391 


Neberieza, Amy 


391 


390 


Mourelatos. T. 




257 


Nedzel, Andrew 


242, 391 


243, 298 


Mouser, David 


237 


309 


Neel, J. 


250 


293 


Mouser, K. 




244 


Neff, Dave 


178 


352 


Mowbray, Joel 




317 


Neidich, Mindy 


239 


239 


Moy, Janice 




391 


Neihengen, Christopher 


391 


261 


Moy, Sharon 




391 


Neilson. R. 


275 


284 


Moyers. W. 




278 


Neitzke. Jeff M. 


281 


338 


Mozingo. Scott 


238 


332 


Nejman, Susan 


391 


284. 390 


Mraz, Jill 


118 


391 


Nellessen, Sarah 


391 



o 
c 

T 
O 
B 
E 
R 



25 Five students were killed and 30 were injured when a school bus was hit by a commuter train in Fox River Grove, 111. The 
bus was separated from its frame as a result of the crash. 

26 The aggressive new House Republican majority passed a historic plan to balance the budget within seven years and overhaul 
generations of federal programs designed to redress the nation's most pressing social problems. 

28 Tens of thousands of Canadians (in an emotional outpouring) converged on Montreal to declare their love of a united 
Canada and to beg Quebec voters not to vote for separation. 

29 Six thousand people were killed when Bosnian Serbs overran Srebrenica in possibly the worst war crime in Europe since 
World War II. The failure of outsiders to intervene was a low point in Bosnian policy. 

31 Quebec voters decided to remain a part of Canada as a frenzied separatist drive to create a new nation was defeated by the 
slenderest of margins, 50.6 percent to 49.4 percent. U of I worker Maria Gratton was attacked and murdered at the social 
work building in Urbana. 



Index 



439 



E 
R 



I .:>. iKKjps left for Bosnia in an attempt to restore peace. 

Space Shuttle Columbia safely landed at Cape Canaveral, Fla., ending its second longest flight ever. Israeli Prime Minister 
Yitzhak Rabin was shot and Killed as he left a peace rally in Tel Aviv, and an Israeli who had supported Israeli settlers was! 
arrested. It was the first assassination of a Prime Minister in the 47-year histoiy of the state of Israel. 

Three American servicemen pleaded guilty to conspiring to abduct and rape a 12-year-olci Okinawa girl in a case that caused 
an uproar throughout Japan. 

Authorities confirmed that James Radic murdered U of I computer programmer Maria Gratton. 

Germany lifted a ban on cultivating hemp, but not using it recreationally. The German government said farmers should be 
alile to take advantage of the market potential for the hemp plant, having many uses in industry and being an energy source. 



Nel.son, B. 
Nelson, C. 
Nelson, E. 
Nelson, Geoff 
Nelson, I. 
Nelson. Jeff 
Nelson. John 
Nelson. K. 
Nelson. L. 
Nel.son. Rendy S. 
Nel.son, S. 
Nelson, Tom 
Nestor. Marc 
Nesvacil. Robert J. 
Neil. Christopher 
Nenendank. Laura 
Neuhaus, E. 
Neuman. Corey 
Neville. C. 
Nevius. K. 
.Newell. Jennifer 
Newhairsen. Cori 
Newland. .Alicia 
Newman. Eve 
Newman, Jessica 
Newsome, Collinus 
Newton, Kathleen 
Ng. Dora Ontario 
Ng, Maggy 
Ngo. M. 

Nguyen. Chaffee 
Nguyen. Elizabeth 
Nguyen, John 
Nguyen, Phi 
.Nguyen, Tuan 
Nichols. Ken 
Nicholson. Julie 
Nickas. Steve 
Nickell. Jane Ellen 
Nickerson, Allison 
.Nicklewicz. B. 
Nicola. Victor 
Nicolandis. Calliope 
Nicole, T. 
Nicolle. Tori 
Nicpon. David 
Niebaigge. Jeffrey 
Nieciecki, Catherine 
Nielsen, Cara 
Nielson. William 
Niemayer. S. 
Niemczewski, L. 
Nicmeyer. Susan 
Niemiec. Jennifer 
Nieng, Cathy 
Nietschki, Jon 
Nightengale, J. 
Noback, Charles 
Nobel, J 
.Noble, Jill 
Nolen, Christopher 
Nolting, Carl 
Nommensen, Anna 
Nfjonan, David 
Norbul. J 
Nordbrock, A. 
Norgle, Rcgine 

.'irlin. Erik 

.'irman. H 
Norris, tlealhrc 
Norri.s, J:K(|uelyn 
s.'.rn- I'T'Ttiv 



251 
250 
294 
276 
278 
283 
291 
244 
240. 252, 275 
281 
253 
290 
40, 96 

306, 391 
317 
391 

257, 348 
391 
278 
266 

257, 391 
32- 

321, 391 
391 

243, 316 
212 
391 
391 
32 
250 
391 
391 
62 
391 
391 
290 
394 
293 
85 
243 
331 
394 

394 

331 
321 
394 
394 
394 
74 
394 
349 
266 
394 
39 1 
.391 
2i2 
.331 
290 
257 
.394 
299 
372 
123, 243. .302, 304 

290, 394 
244 
240 

321. 394 
327 
255 
2~1 
12^ 
310 



Norris, Natalie 
North, Raymond 
Norton, N. 
Nosko, Anne 
Nottingham. Sean 
Novack, Mike 
Novak, J. 
Novak, Janna 
Nowak. John 
Nowak, Tony 
Nowakoski, Keith 
Nowicki. Ralph 
Nowik, Kristie 



264, 394 


Nowoj. Adarn 


394 


Nudell, Marina 


252, 331 


Nuding, Mindy 


338 


Nunamaker, A. 


293 


Nunez, K. 


241 


Nunez. Revnaldo 


244 


Nurkiewicz, R. 


394 


Nurnberg. Heidi 


138 


Nygaard, James 


262 


Nyssar. lim 


332 




394 




394 





394 
394 
271 
252 
244 
285 
252 
271 
273 
313 




b 



Charlie Manlapaz 



I'eler Macke\ 



O'Brien. Ckiirc 


326 


O'Brien, lim 


237 


O'Connell, Christy 


91, 99, 24,s 394 


O'Connor, Keny 


168 


O'Connell, John 


jsm. -92 


O'Connell, Katie 


_^^/m- 271 


O'Connor, J. 


«"^^^^ 294 


O'Connor, Josh 


241 


O'Connor, Marie 


346 


ODonnell, Bill 


261, 304, 394 


O'Donnell, J. 


253. 298, 348 


ODonnell, K. 


294 


O'Donnell, M, 


266 


O'Donnell, Matt 


237, 309 


O'Donnoghue, K. 


244 


O'Grady. S. 


253 


(.:i'Hara. N. 


278 


O'Keefe. C. 


264 


O'Kelly, S. 


250 


O'Leaiy. Erin 


266. 394 


O'Leaiy. J. 


253. 266 


O'Melia. C. 


275 


O'Neal, Patrick 


292 


O'Neill, Bridget 


275. 333, 338 


O'Neill, Katie 


277. 298 


O'Reilly, Sean 


293. m 


O'Shea, Brendan 


394 


OStillivan, Jason 


394 


OMalley, Elizabeth 


65 


(^halil, Jennifer 


271 


(Jbenauf, Meg 


252 


Oberc, Jeremy L. 


281,394 


Oberle. Janet 


175, 394 


Obradovich. N. 


294 


Ochoco. Marie 


244. 394 


Ochoncinski. C. 


240 


Oczak, H. 


253 


Odum, K. 


240 


Oestreich. John 


206 


Ofelnlock. Todd 


287 


Oh, Helen 


m 


Oh, J. 


291 


Oh, John 


309 


Oh, S. 


.131 


Oh. Sandy 


243 


Ohannes, Larr\' 


394 


Ohotnicky. Susan 


.394 


Ohrem. Kimberly 


243 


Okubo. Shun.suke 


298. 325 


01efsk>-, Am\- 


239 


01efsk>-. Jayne 


.394 


Olguin. De'A\lin 


299 


Olixer. James 


276 


01i\eros. Michael 


iV 


Olkiewicz. Stacy 


181, 246, .394 


Ohik.sen, Eric 


394 


( Jlsen. Da\id 


287. 327 


t )lsheski. Jeff 


242 


c^lson. .'Micia 


334. 394 


Olson, Charles 


143 


Olson, Kir.steri 


209 


Olson. TJ. 


262 


Olson. Willi.im 


350. .351 


Onsi.ul, ,\1 


269 


( >on\s, Jennifer 


.394 


Oonis, Tara 


142 


Operzeiiek, M, 


240 


Opiela. A. 


253 


Ori. M, 


257 


Oikin. Bill 


331. .394 


t)rloll, I'nii 


2.39 


Oro/co. .Socorro 


21" 



440 



Index 



Orpet, Tar>n 








276 


Parker, Natasha 




299 


Perez, Linda 




395 


Pickell, Jonathon 






276 


Orr, Beth 








277 


Parker, R. 


291 


349 


Perino, C.ina 




252 


Pickens, Mitchell 






395 


Orsi, Mike 








291 


Parks, Drew 




242 


Perkins. S. 




269 


Pickrell, Jason 






237 


Ortega, Caria R. 








249 


Parmelee, Heather 


278 


346 


Perkins, Tony 




242, 313 


Pierce, Krisin 






395 


Orti?. Brian 








394 


Parr, Colleen 




394 


Perkinson, Aaron 




395 


Pierog, J. 






240 


Ortiz. Cintia 








290 


Parrillo, V. 




294 


Perkin.son, Alan 




332 


Pierson, Brigette 






310 


Ortiz. Orniar 








282 


Parsley. Jonathan 




394 


Peroulas, Thomas 




94, 95, 395 


Pietsch, Mike 




395 


412 


O.sborn. .Mail 








394 


Parsons, K 




244 


Perri, .Stephanie 




.395 


Pilcher, K. 






269 


Osbron, Heather 








394 


Parsons, Katherine 




394 


Perrings, Katy 




264, 324 


Pilewski, T. 






253 


Oshwald. .1. 








244 


Parsons, Kalhy 


243 


346 


Perry, Jason 




326 


Pilkaitis. T. 






275 


O.stling, Karin 






248 


,394 


Pa.sdach, B. 




331 


Perry, M. 




275 


Pinks, Kelly 






395 


O.swald. Cliris 








238 


Pasquesi, Caroline 


246 


394 


Perry. Vanessa 




395 


Pinto. Jennifer 




91,99 


395 


Otocki. Ronald 








394 


Pastemak, Vicky 




316 


Perschke, Carolyn 




395 


Pinzino, David 






395 


Otsuka, Gregory 






262 


,394 


Pastore. John 




394 


Persson. Brad 




282 


Piotrowicz, K. 






275 


Ottenteld. H. 








252 


Pataky, Alex 




394 


Perz, Elizabeth 




395 


Piper, Stephanie 






395 


Ottenfeld. J. 








252 


Patano, B. 




349 


Pesce, A. 




294 


Pippel, S. 






244 


Otto. Jennifer 








253 


Patel, A. 




331 


Pesi, C. 




253 


Piptone, M. 






246 


Ovcina. Renee 








243 


Patel, Alpa 




311 


Peters, Clint 




237 


Piraino, Michael 






395 


Overtoom. Ryan 








273 


Patel, Bharat 




310 


Peters, John L. 




395 


Pistorius. J. 






266 


Owens, Lisa 








394 


Patel, Darshan 




284 


Peters, K. 




236 


Pistorius. Jill 






395 


Owens, Patrick 








280 


Patel, Rajesh 




394 


Peters, K. 




266 


Pitman, Michele 






395 


Ozier, ,S. 








275 


Patel, S. 


266 


331 


Peters, Kri.sta 




395 


Pitts. A. 






257 


Ozley, Suzanna 






264 


394 


Patel, Vikas 
Pater, Derek 
Patt, J. 




394 
395 
278 


Peters, Malt 
Peters, Patrick 
Peters, Timothy 




261 

241 

283, 395 


Plack. Chri.stopher 
Plank, T. 
Plankis, Tina 






282 

246 

32- 












Patten. James Lee-Van 


88, 89 


Petersen, A. 




246 


Plath, Brian J. 






281 


I'jcliMlski Mike 


.^ 


M|^ 


^ 


262 


Patterson. Melinda 




395 


Petersen, Doug 




260 


Plavcan, Matt 






291 


I'.iik, Alicia 


m 


■ 


^ 


248 


Patton, A. 




253 


Petersen, Tyler 




395 


Pleiss, B. 






252 


Pack.uxl, John 




^ 


■ 


394 


Patton, Antwoine 


156 


160 


Petersen, Victoria 




395 


Plemons, Chad 






260 


Padhekl, Lory 




V 


■ 


394 


Pauasugo, Paul 




179 


Peterson, A. 




246 


Ploog, H. 






269 


Padfiekl. Toby 




■ 


■ 


394 


Paul, K. 




244 


Peterson, Ann 




395 


Plumer, A. 






255 


Padilla, Robert 




M 


^ 


290 


Paul, Renae 




172 


Peterson, Anne 




302, 303 


Plummer, Adam 






395 


Paelella, T 


»-i^ 


^P 




244 


Paulitz, David 




109 


Peterson, Brian 




395 


Pocius, L. 






275 


Pagakis, Kathy ,^ 


W^ 






80 


Paulsen, Heather 




395 


Peterson, Carrie 




146, 147 


Pocius, Sara 






321 


Page, Kristi :| 


m 






271 


Paulsen, S. 




244 


Peterson, Cliff 




237, 313 


Podgorski, Chris 






261 


Pagoria, Matt 








290 


Pauly, Lisa 


243 


395 


Peterson, Clifford 




395 


Podhrasky, A. 






244 


Painter, Becky 








37 


Paval, Michael 




395 


Peterson, D. 




349 


Podorsek. Sarah 






324 


:'akla, Pauline 








248 


Paveza, Ryan 




175 


Peterson. Doug 




261 


Podrebarac. Rebecca 






395 


^alac, Mike 








263 


Pavlovic, Tamara 




326 


Peterson, K. 




252 


Podusca, Brian 






395 


'alacio, Grace 








394 


Pawlak, A, 




349 


Peterson, M. 




264, 275 


Podvika. Carl 






289 


'alao-Ricketts, Francisco 






282 


Pawlak, Corelyn 




395 


Peterson, Meli.ssa 




333, 338 


Poeschel, Timothy 






395 


''alcer, Matthew 








287 


Pawlak, Dan 




267 


Peterson, Stephen M. 




395 


Poetzel. Adam 






261 


>aley, B, 








246 


Paxton, John 




395 


Petraitis, Lisa 




243 


Poff, Marsha 






321 


'alkon. Tom 








242 


Pazderski, JoAnne 




271 


Petros, Dean 




395 


Pogue, Carissa 






395 


'aimer. Amy 








276 


Peabody, Danielle 




243 


Petroskey. Karen 




338, 395 


Poki-yfke, Leann 






395 


'aimer. Mark 








327 


Pearl, Julie 


239 


395 


Pettijohn, K. 




275 


Poletti, Ben 






237 


'aimer. Mike 








293 


Pearman, Barry 




211 


Petty, C. 




278 


Pollit, Wade 






283 • 


'almreuter, Arny 






252 


338 


Pearson, Erica 


243 


395 


Pfaffinger. Christine 




240 395 


Poluchowicz, Andrei 






395 


'akimbo. Jo.seph 








394 


Pearson, K. 




257 


Pfile, Tammy 




395 


Pomerantz. Rachel 






239 


'anchal, Vik 








311 


Pearson, Mike 




20S 


Pfister, Daniel 




395 


Pomering, Grant 






395 


'anek, Mike 








86 


Pearson, Tim 




280 


Pfister, Mike 




262 


Pomis. Aaron 






395 


'anova, Katherine 








95 


Peck, Andrea 


243, 342 


395 


Pfluger, Jennifer 




326 


Pommerenke, K. 






257 


'ansa, J. 








266 


Peck, Nicole 




395 


Phair, k" 




278 


Pontarelli. Anne Marie 




271 


'apa. joey 






248 


394 


Pecoraro Jr., Giacomo 




395 


Phelan, Carla 




395 


Pontarelli, Becky 






271 


'aradis. Tina 








394 


Pedersen. Ann 




74 


Phillabauin, Tracy 




395 


Ponzio, Ben 




315 


, 344 


'aras, A. 








253 


Pedersen, H. 




240 


Phillip, Mark 




242 


Poole, Rodney 






395 


I'arashos. John 
'arasugo, Paul 








291 


Pedro. Tamara 




395 


Phillippi, K. 




253 


Pope, H. 






255 








178 


Pedroza, Kim 


269 


395 


Phillips, C. 




257 


Popp, A. 






244 


'arenti, J. 








251 


Peele, Brandon 


242 


298 


Phillips. D. 




266 


Porch, Sherri 






395 


'arikh, A. 








263 


Peerless, Brian 




395 


Phillips. J. 




269 


Portman, D. 






331 


.'arikh, Khushali 






310 


394 


Pelaez, Antoinette 




395 


Phillips, M. 




2520 


Portman, Dana 






239 


''arikh. Miraj 








394 


Pelak, K. 




294 


Phillips, Mark A, 




284, 395 


Portnoy, Leslie 




285, 304 


, 395 


'arikh, P, 








331 


Pelletier, Kristie 




240 


Philo, Ryan 




■ 241 


Posey, Natasha 






310 


'arikh, Ritesh 








394 


Pelletiere, J. 




250 


Phipps, M. 




246 


Poss, S. 






252 


'aris, Jeff 








290 


Pelley, Gregory S. 




281 


Piano. M. 




246 


Potempa, Robert 






395 


fark, Eugene 








290 


Penk, Jamie 




261 


Piatek. C. 




240 


Pott, Ryan 






242 


^ark. jocelyn 








306 


Penny, Chris 




310 


Piatek, Chris 




338 


Potter, S, 






255 


arker, Alyx 








267 


Pepper, Gary- 




237 


Picard. A. 




246 


Pottgen, Jennifer 






395 


arker, Andrew 






47 


276 


Peppers, Elissa 




276 


Picard, Dave 




242 


Potthast, Michael 






284 


iarker, Dan 








283 


Peralta, Greta 




271 


Picchietti, Adam 




280 


Potthoff, Mary Jane 




248 


. 352 


arker, Joshua 








276 


Percy, John 




46 


Pichardok, Elizabeth 




290 


Powell, Jimmy 






261 


arker, K. 

'k A A A A 


AAA 


k A i 


^ m 


257 


Perella, Andy 

AAAAAAA4 


h A A 4 


179 


Pickard, Chades J. 


A A 4 


281 

k A A A 


Powell. Mai-wan 

ft ^h ^k ^k ^h ^k 


ft A 1 


ft A A 


396 

AAA* 


|> V V V V 


W V V 


r W % 


9 % 


1 V 9 


WWWW9W9% 


> 9 9 i 


t 9 




V V t 


V V V V 


P V V V V V ' 


W 9 < 


P V V 


• • • • 


22 
V 

E '' 

Vf 28 


The presidents of three rival Balkan states 


agreed 


to make peace, ending 


nearly 


four years 


of ethnic bloodletting 


that left 




250,000 people dead 

20 000 AniFrir^ns 


in the worst European war since 


Worfd War II. Clinton pledged that the NATO force would 


include 




David 


Papa 


, an emp 


oyee at Domino's Pizza in Florida 


, won $237,257 in 


damages in the first male sexual h 


irassment case. 


His boss apparently 


fired him when he as 


<:ed her 


to stop making sexual 


remarks toward hi 


m. 








President Clinton released the speed limit 


ban in the United States. Each 


state now had the 


right to choose 


Its respective 




B 29 


speed 


limit. 


























Britain 


and Ireland reached a compromise 


over the hi,'- 


h Republican Army's role 


in negotiations that should 


allow 


peace 


talks 


E 


for Norther 


1 h-eland 


to go forward. 




















R 































INDEX 



441 



R 



i() 



Voters ca,sied an uniisiuilly high amount of ballots in Oregon to find a sucessor for Senator Bob Packwood. It was the first 
statewide race decided by mail. U.S, Rep. Ron Wyden and Oregon Senate President Gordon Smith won the vote. 
France announced it would resume active participation in NATO's military wing after being pulled out 30 years ago by 
diaries de Gaulle. 

.Viichael Jackson collapsed on stage in Manhattan while rehearsing for an HBO special. He was also scheduled to perform in 
;!x' Billboard Music Awards, but was forced to miss them. 

Ill San Francisco, a luxury home tumbled into a gaping sinkhole after a sewer line collapsed during a torrential downpour. 
A U.S. Marine apologizeci in an Okinawa court for nis role in a rape case that has shaken defense ties between Japan and 
f!ie United States, but he insisted that he did not actually rape the 12-year-old girl. 

l^ff Gett>'. a man dying of AIDS in San Francisco, received a baboon's bone marrow in an experimental procedure that may 
•^ave his life. The leaders of Bosnia, Serbia and Croatia signed a peace agreement in Paris. 

Just nine days before Christmas, a fire destroyed a Detroit warehouse jammed with donated clothes, household goods and 
furniture that were to be distributed as gifts. 



Powell, Matt 


284 


Rader, Jeannine 


• • • • 

243, 396 


Ramirez, Christopher 39, 


311 


Raphael, Allison 


t • • • 9^ 

239 


Powers, S. 


244 


Rader, Julie 


396 


Rampson, K, 


252 


Raquel, Warren 


276 


Pozen. Brian 


282, 396 


Rader, Kent 


396 


Ramsey, Brian 


262 


Rastorfer, Heather 


346 


Pozen. Patricia 


396 


Radovich, Jennifer 


264, 396 


Ramsey, Jen 


276 


Rathsack, Ben 


396 


Prater, John 


284 


Raford, Sonya 


310 


Randel, Baret 


261 


Ratner, Aaron 


262 


Pratesa, Kevin 


96 


Rahman, Santano 


396 


Randel, Melissa 


352 


Raucci, Drew 


242 


Prather, Penelope 


396 


Rahn, Amanda 


271 


Randle, LaDonna 


396 


Raver, Lance 


396 


Pratt, A. 


2S3 


Rahn, Jandy 


252 


Randolph, K. 


253 


Ravestein, Ana 


338 


Pray. A. 


269 


Rajkarne. Deepa 


338 


Randolph, Rye 


238 


Ray, Melissa 


396 


Prechtel, A. 


275 


Rajski, Jeff 


287 


Randolph, Travis 


396 


Ray. R. 


246 


Preissner, Paul 


396 


Ramano, J. 


257 


Rangan, Jay 


282 


Raycraft. Mike 


308 


Presnak, S. 


253 


Rambaker, Christian 


242 


Ranquist, M. 


246 


Raymond, Ashlea 


308 


Presser, Susan D. 


281 


Rainey, C. 


250 


Ransom, N. 


278 


Raymond, Brittini 


266, 396 


Prette, M. 


253 










Raynolds, K. 


252 


Priesbe, Teresa 


323 

246 










Read, A, 
Reader, Dave 


251 


Prie.st, A. 










339 


Priest, K, 


348 










Rebecca, Jennifer 
Reed, China 
Reed, Joann 
Reed, Mildred 


327 
396 
285 
396 


Prieto, B. 
Princehorn, M. 
Pritchett. K. 


331 
240 
331 




— — . — 


^^^^^^^^^ 


~~~~ 1 




Pritts, Paul 


276 








H 




Reeder, David 


396 


Privette, R. 


278 








^^^^ 1 




Reep, Erin E, 


396 


Probst, Christopher 


396 








H^^^^ 




Reese, A. 


349 


Prockovic, Angel 


72 








^^^^H 




Reese. Shanon 


396 


Prodyma, M. 


269 








^^^^H 




Reetz, C, 


240 


Propst, Jason 


284, 396 








^^^^^L^ 




Reffett, Eric 


396 


Provinse, Jason 


396 








^^^^^^^^ 




Refuik, R. 


250 




68, 69 




*Kg 




^^^^^^K 




Regan, CJ, 


293 




248, 396 




uB 


^^^P^B 




Regan, Kathy 


78, 79, 335 


PrN'or, Kimberlee 


253 






^^^V^V ^H 




Regan, Shamus 


282 


Pr\'or. Mattliew 


327, 396 
252, 313 




4 pWIK^lj 




H^Kflm 1 




Rehn. E. 
Reicheneker, N, 


275 


Puccini, Brooke 


^B^BVl — 1 


269 


Pudik, Case 


313 




^^H^|^P\ H 




Reichert, Jason 


262 


Pugh, Libya V, 


41 


H ^ii?^9^K 




p^^Hum^ I 




Reid, J. 
Reider, A. 


264 
331 


PuUen, Frances 


396 




u QflSo 


'j ^mwS^^L^ 


^^^^^H^^^^^EmT^^S ^H 




Purcha.se, Ken 


328 




w^g^^l^M^ 


^^^^^^K^-^^L 1 




Reilly, Aaron 


292, 387 


Purgear, J. 


264 




Lm^^K 


° ^^^^^KL^^B 1 




Reimer, Brian 


238 


W BH^^q^^ 


Pur-sley, j. 


264 






JeJH^^I 


^^^^H^^M^V ^1 




Reinert, Sarah 


338 


Putnam, James W, 


281 




P ^^R^^Hp^ 


^t^^BR 


^^^^Stf^^m 1 




Reinhart, J, 


240 


Putz, Karl 


330 




■ ^H^HM^Mki^ 


1 I'^^^jf 


^^^R Jh ^ 1 




Reinhart, T, 


240 


Pyle, J. 


255 




n ^^^^Hv\i 


IV SB 




Keinish, Julie 


338, 396 


Pyrdek, A. 


253 




1 lSE \ 


' 1* ^1 




Reitzel, j". 


331 


Pyrtel, Ahavah 


83 




A Yi fl i 


|V>>^^|. '^ iJ 




Keitzel, Jason 


396 


I'ytlak. Steven 


241, 396 




1 mMtUtt ^ 


■Jft' ■ * 




Remotigue, Jeffrey 


241. 352. 396 








, r_^— ^ 


HHp ' 


^■S|^|M^j|^^H^ **-^H 




Remotigue, Steve 


211 










S^^^ 


ShBH'^HI !■ 




Kendel, Sharon 
Renken, Dana 


313, 326 
277,396 


Qi, Sumin 


396 




B^Kgl 




S^^^^^^^ ~' '"'V^^^H ^^^1 




Renkes, Julia 


252 


Quan. ,Steve 


241 








Hj^^r "7 ^^^H ^^^H 




Renner, Jennifer 


271, 396 


Quartullo, Anthony 


3'X) 




Jl^^M 




B^y '"^"'^l^^^^B ^^H 




Rennick, Jamie 


78, 79, 335 


Quesse, A. 


l^^ 




j.^^M 




Sj^^jsbkk^^^H ^^H 




Repmann, Paul 


291 


Quigley, Brian 


26-, 3iv 




/4^l 








Repp, Darin 


300 


Quinn, Kric 


39(> 




' ^^^^1 


^^^P>jBI 


h^^^^^^^BS^KS^^^ ^^H 




Ke(|uena, Christopher 


281 


Quinn, Megan 


396 




^^^^1 


^^^r J^B 


I^^^^^^^B'^^^H^^BI ^^B 




Kelana. Susana 


396 


Quinn, .Scott 


396 




^^^H 




I^^^^^^^^L ^^^^^H ^^H 




Keuller, Eric 


238 


Quinn, Tiffany 


299, 396 




^^^1 




^^^^^^^H^^^^^^H ^^H 




Keweker, Christian 


313 


Quinn, W. 


269 


^^^ ^^H 




"-X^^^^F V #1 ^1 




Rexroat, Sara 


332 


Quinler<:), Kicardo 


285 


W 








Reyes, N. 
Reyes, Nicole 
Reyes, P 
Rcyna, Ismael 


253 
396 
294 
285 


Raab. Kelly ^ 


m 91 






M^H^^I^^H^^H 1^1 




Re/a, Debbie 


396 


^^ft^^^ 


^ 241 


^^^^^^^ 




^H^^^^^^B ll^^H ^^H 




Rhea. Bridget 


.300. 326 


^Kw^ 


33i 


^^^^^h' 




^I^^^^^^Bl^^^^^l ^^1 




Rhodes, J, 


294 


^H 


278 
2,38 
396 


U^LU 




_^^^^^^^^^^^K^^^^^^^|__^^^| 




Khodes, Jo.sh 
Khoiles, "s, 
Rhodes, Stephanie 


283 


Kalx-r, Doug ^^H 
Rachel), Kristic ^H 




H^I^I^I^^^^I^^I^^I^HIiii^HIH^H^r 


266 
312 






P.lUl I Tl,lll( 


, 


Rachowilz, I. ^^B 


275 










RliMie. K 


252 


Ra( koff. Jarrcl 


396 










Ricudi, J 


257 


Radfcki, 15, 


269 










Riccard, Julie 


352 


Radfinachcr, Brad 


2.37 










Rice. Aiii\- 


26(1, 396 


Radcmacher, Matthew 


396 










Kice, l-'iic 


.39(1 



442 



Index 




f^^^i^^^^^^ 



PROUD TO BE A PART OF UIUC's CONTINUED GROWTH 




PLANT AND ANIMAL 

BIOTECHNOLOGY LABORATORY 

GOODWIN AT GREGORY 



LAW BUILDING 

EXPANSION AND RENOVATION 

PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE 



-A^ 



CHEMICAL AND LIFE 

SCIENCES LABORATORY 

GOODWIN AT CALIFORNIA 



Construction Management • General Contracting • Construction Consulting 



Q^J^* 



BUILDING 



~X>^ COMPANY 



8725 WEST HIGGINS, SUITE 700 • CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 60631 
T 312-693-9200 F. 312-693-5025 



Serving Champaign - Urbana 
Since 1969 



E LECTRI C 

Proud \o have 

Parhcipaled In Ike 

Developmenl o( Ihe 

following Projecbi 

/Islronomy Buildln<) 

^rea Sbdies Building 

Campus kecrealion Pkyheld 

PesHclde 5lora<)e Building 



604 North Elm Street 
Champaign, IL 61820 

(217)352-0144 
(217) 352-0161 Fax 



LEVERCNZ ELECIRI 



Inc. 



A PADTNED 

IN THE 

BUILDING or EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE 

AT THE 

UNIVEPcSITY or aLINOIcS 



Chemical (^ Life (Science Laboratory 



141 N. WALNUT 61832-4712 
DANVILLE. ILLINOIS 

Dependable Electric .Service Since 1928 



ADVERTISEMENTS 443 






■•■3-.; 

E 
R 



! ) jns Davis and her daughter Phyllis were charged with leaving their eight children in a filthy Chicago apartment. In anothe 
'i.,'ighborhood, two infants were similarly found in an abandoned apartment with buckets of urine and feces. 

vn American Airlines jet with 159 passengers aboard crashed near the southwest city of Cali, Colombia. Ukraine and the 
Oroup of Seven industrial countries agreed to close the Chernobyl nuclear power station. 

•Singer and actor Dean Martin died this Christmas day at the age of 78. 

Three white Pittsburgh police officers were accused of killing a black motorist and stood trial of involuntary manslaughter. 
China named the committee (the Prepatory Committee) that will be responsible for steering Hong Kong through its transfer 
from British colony to Chinese rule in 1997. 



Kice. Jen 




271 


Rodgers. Jay 


Kite, l. 




269 


Rodgers. Mar>'lyn F. 


Rice, Melissa 




396 


Rodman. C. 


Rice, S. 




269 


Rodriguez, Ivelissa 


Rice. Simeon 


154. 155. 158 


162 


Roegge, K. 


Richard. Paul A. 




396 


Roenna, J, 


Richards, B. 


257 


269 


Roesslein, Kent 


Richards. Beth 


342 


396 


Roger. Eric 


Richards. Doug 




293 


Rogers, B. 


Richards. S. 




264 


Rogers, Dennie Tyree 


Richardson. Amy 




396 


Rogers, Kolette 


Richardson. Gerard 




396 


Rogowski, Gary A. 


Richardson. John 




273 


Rogowski, Wendy 


Richardson. Paul 


279 


396 


Rohr, Michael 


Richart, Greg 




290 


Roitstein, Carrie 


Richie. Deborah 




88 


Rojanavong.se, Nisa 


Richman, Chris 




396 


Rojham, K. 


Richmond. Jason 




242 


Rolf, Brian 


Richter. Shane 




396 


Rolf, Donna 


Riden. Karen 




277 


Roller. Molly 


Rieke. Jeanette 




396 


Rolls, C. 


Riggins. Andrew 


283 


396 


Romano. Elizabeth 


Riggs. Xen 




326 


Romano, N. 


Riley. Dawn 




212 


Romo, Natalie 


Riley. Dean .Sylvia 




317 


Rooney, Bill 


Riley. Pam 




302 


Rooney, Dave 


Rink. E. 




26-1 


Roos, Diana 


Rinker. P, 




257 


Roper, Reginald 


Rinker. Tracy 


257 


396 


Rosa, Anselmo 


Riordan. P. 




275 


Rosado, Jacqueline 


Rios, Trish 




396 


Rosado, M, 


Ripley, David 




241 


Resales, Giraldo 


Ripley, K. 




278 


Rosas, Sarah 


Ri.satti. G. 




278 


Rosczyk, Ben 


Risberg. Christoplier 




396 


Rosczyk, Nathan 


Rising. Erin 




396 


Rose. C. 


Ritsma. Natasha 




362 


Rcsen, Bonnie 


Ritz. Anthony 




310 


Rosen, Marti 


Rivera. Ennedy D. 




290 


Rosen, Mary 


Rivera. Lizette 




290 


Rosen, Sharon 


Rivera. Norm 




280 


Rosenberg, Gabriel 


Rivera, Russbel 




285 


Ro.senfeld. Lisa 


Rivkin. Marni 




271 


Rosenstein. Jamie 


Rizo, Dennis J. 




285 


Rosiak, E. 


Ro, Shelley 




396 


Rosing, Bob 


Roach. A. 




246 


Ross. Jeff 


Robb. L, 




240 


Ross, Rebecca 


Robert. Matthew 




396 


Rosser, K. 


Robert. Shawna 




298 


Rosser, Nathan 


Roberts. H. 




255 


Rost, Brian 


Roberts. Jennifer 




217 


Rosy, Chris 


Roberts, Marc W. 


281 


398 


Rotramel. Chad 


Roberts, N, 




240 


Rottach, Timothy 


Roberts, Peter B. 




284 


Rottman. Aaron 


Roberts, Rachel 


264 


398 


Roubal, Victoria 


Roberts, S. 


252 


278 


Rounds, Greg 


Robertson, Thes.sa 




398 


Rounds. Maureen 


Robinson, Adam 




287 


Rounds. Ted 


Robmson, Amy 




2i3 


Roupas. Stacle 


Robinson, Angela 




398 


Rourke. Courtney 


Robiason, Angle 




248 


Roush, J. 


Robin.son, Cindy 




398 


Rovel, Jenifer 


Robin.son, Eric 




398 


Roverts, Dawn 


Robinson, Rebecca 




398 


Row, S. 


Roliinson, Roy 




283 


Rowden, 0. 


Kohinson, I'heresa 




271 


Rowe, T. 


Kobison, I'roclor 




242 


Roy, K 


Kockelmann, Mike 




290 


Roy, S. 


Kockenbach. Harliara 




398 


Royce, Alli.son 


KockwfKxi, N. 


269 


349 


Royei, Rebecca 


Koclcn, Rebecca 




398 


RozewUz, Todd 


l(.,d.-, '. 




216 


Ro/gus, Amar.i 



48, 



280 
57. 326 
29-4 
352 
253 
251 

260. 304, 398 
398 
266 

334. 342, 398 
398 
281 

240, 311, 398 
398 
246, 398 
398 
264 
283 

236, 308, 398 
338 
278 
398 
244 
62, 253 
398 
293 
398 
398 
285 
398 
294 
24, 25 
398 
283 
283 
294 
239 
239 
398 
79, 335 
92, 93 

128, 352, 398 
239 
269 
293 
325 
142, 398 
257 
362 
287 
398 
320 
398 
331, 398 
398 
287 
276 
276 
269, 398 
81 
244 
58 
271 
269 
278 
278 
253 
294 
239 
277 
398 

V)2.. ■(05. 398 



Ruben. Rebecca 
Rubin. J. 

Rubin. Jaccjueline 
Rubin. Jill 
Rubinson. Mark 
Rubinson. Yori Barak 
Rudiak. J. 
Rudich. Jen 
Rudin. Brent 
Rudnick. Gregory 
Rue, Matthew 
Ruester, Valerie L. 
Ruff, Angela 
Ruff, Brian 
Ruiz. Jo.se 
Ruiz, S, 
Ruiz. Teresa 
Rumps, Jeremy 
Rundell. P. 
Rungsang. Ruttha 
Ruoti, Robert 
Rupert, Bryce 
Ruppert, chad 
Ruscheinski, Paul 
Rusoneles. S. 
Russell, A. 
Russell, Brian 
Russell, Scott 
Russo, D. 
Russo, M, 
Russo, P. 
Rustemeyer, Matt 
Ruth, K. 

Rutherford. John 
Rutland. J. 
Rutter. Rick 
Ryan, A. 
Ryan. Dan 
Ryan, Eric 
Ryan, Jen 
Ryan, K. 
Ryan, L. 
Ryan, T. 

Ryback. Andrew 
Rybarczyk. Regan 
Rychlowski. S. 
Rymsza, Julie 
Ryterski, E. 



Saarnio, Eric 
Saban, Nicholas 
Sabbert, Becky 
Sabo, Renee 
SabrowskI, B. 
.Sabuco, N. 
.Sacchitello, .\ngeni 
■Sachs, .\ndrew 
Sachs, Eric 
,Saed, Alexis 
Safford, Kevin 
Sage, Troy 
Sager. Chad 
,Saggioli, I.uca 
.Sahr, Angela 
Sal.i. .Steven 
.Salanione, Michael 
Salasche, Amy 
.Salasche, I ).i\ na 
.Saleh, Tani,i 
S,ik'm, (lirisliiplu'i I 



s 



285, 


398 


Salemi, G. 




257 


Sallas, Paulette 


220, 221 


348 


Sallis, Joy 


79 


335 


Sallman, B. 




283 


Salter, Cody 




398 


Saltzman, Craig 




251 


Salzman, Jessy 




239 


Samaan, Marcus 




282 


Samaritano, Dave 




398 


Sampat, Neha 


326 


398 


Sampson, Barry 




281 


Sams, Michael 




398 


Samson, Linda 




242 


Sanbonmatsu. Tamami 


282 


398 


Sanchez, Maria 




264 


Sanchez, R. 




398 


Sanchez, Ro.sa 




242 


Sanchez, Theresa 




250 


Sandberg, Tyler 




398 


Sanders, David 


291 


398 


Sanders. Donald 




237 


Sanders, Hope 


237 


398 


.Sanders, Shana 




175 


Sanders. Weston 




278 


Sanderson, 1. 




349 


Sanderson, Lisa 




398 


Sanderson, Robyn 




261 


Sands, Kyle 


266 


348 


Sanghavi, Dhaval 




246 


San.sone, N. 




263 


Santana, Ana 




237 


Santen, Victor Van 




275 


Santoro, Danielle 




284 


Sasse, Allen 




246 


Sather, Maggie 




241 


Satterthwaite, Paul 




294 


.Saunders, Chris 




302 


Saunders, Kendra 




292 


Saunders, Laura 




321 


Savino, Pamela 




294 


Sawaiha, Mark 




269 


Sawatzky, Kevin 




264 


Sawchuck, 1. 


282 


300 


Scaeffer. k. 




289 


Sceisi, Michael 




266 


Schad, Lesley 




243 


Schaefer, J. 




255 


Schaefer, Scott 
Schaffer, Brenda 
Schaffner, Jodi 
.Schaley. Dee.\nn 


1 


398 


Scheeler. Karen 


■ 


398 


.Scheer, J, 




398 


.Schell, Jeanne D. 


^ 294 


398 


Schenk. Rebecca 


m 


240 


Seller. Niclas 


w 


240 


Scherer. Debbie 


2.36 


398 


Scherer. Karl 


298 


316 


Schcrcr. .\l.uk 




24 1 


Scherr. Kelly 




398 


Scheuber, Scott 




325 


Scheuplein, Bret 




398 


.Schieilhauer, Jim 




283 


Si'hieller, Sara 




42 


.Schierer, Beth 




398 


.Schifleitleckei. H. 




398 


.Schilling. Daphne 




398 


.Schilling. Mark 




2.39 


.Schilling. S.ir.ih 


239 


398 


.SchimiiK'l, Kim 




398 


.Schindler. D, 




281 


•Schirei. leremv 



444 



Index 



ichlafter, Heather 


246 


313 


Scott, Kristi 




276 


Shepston, Shad 




400 


Sipes, Summer 




243 


Ichlagel, S. 




257 


Scott, Michele 




399 


Sheridan, Jackie 




271 


Siron, Kir.sten 




243 


Ichlarh. Mallliew 


260 


399 


Scott, R. 




244 


Sherlock, Jennifer 


313 


400 


Siska, Elizabeth 


114, 


400 


ichldsslx-rg. 1. 




278 


Scoville, Ryan 




273 


Sherman, Lauren 




285 


Siska, Mike 




261 


;chl<)s>lierg, Jolinatlian 




273 


.Scully, R. 




278 


Sherman, Richard 




273 


Sison, Charlene 


248, 


400 


.chlueler, Michael 




399 


Seabold, Kri.stin 




399 


Sherry, S, 




251 


Sitabkhan, Nazneen 




400 


ichmidt, A. 




257 


Seaman, K, 




269 


Shibla, William 


342 


400 


Sitter, Jillian 




348 


chmidi. Brian 




399 


.Seba.stian, Julie 




252 


Shields, Greg 




298 


Sitz, C, 




244 


chniKli. Ciolin 




399 


Seegmiller, Anne 




399 


Shiels, S. 




331 


Sitz, Julie 




310 


chniiclt, D. 




253 


.Seehafer, M, 




278 


Shim, Bernard 




327 


Siwek, Amy 




133 


chniRlt, Elizabeth 




399 


Seelow, L. 




255 


Shin, J. 




278 


Sjoholm, T. 




294 


chmidt. Jonathan 


277 


399 


Segal, L, 




294 


Shin, Nick 




282 


Skaggs, Kristi 




400 


thmidt, L. 




275 


Seguin, J. 




263 


Shindler, Stacy 




18 


Skale, Melissa 




239 


chmidt, Laura F. 




281 


Segura, M. 




266 


Shinsky, Jodie 




239 


Skarda, N. 




240 


chmidt, Lif-a 




271 


Sehstedt, M, 




266 


Shipe, Damon 




300 


Skeldon, Shane 




400 


chmidiitz, Laura 




399 


Sehy, M. 




264 


Shirley, Robert 




400 


Skelton. Matthew- 




400 


chmitt, Aimee 




399 


Seibold, John 




263 


Shissler, Andrew 




237 


Skinner. Leigh Ann 




276 


chmitt, K. 




278 


Seidman, Jes.se 




290 


Short, Justin 




237 


Skinner, Tom 




400 


chmitt, KelK' 




399 


Seilheimer, L, 




244 


Showalter, Michelle 




400 


Skirvin. Bob 




332 


chmitt, Kimlierly 




399 


Seilheimer, Lisa 




342 


Showers, Mike 




241 


Skoggsbaken, Kris 




260 


chmitt, lio.salie 




335 


Selinger, Ronit 




239 


Shoy, Scott 




327 


Skoglund, Mike 




293 


chmii/. .^nn 


248, 346 


399 


Selinger, Tal 




239 


Shukas, C. 




294 


Skrysak, M, 




275 


chnable. Ingrid 


306 


399 


Selitto, A, 




257 


Shukas, Thomas 


241 


334 


Skyles, Geoff 




282 


chnelilin, ,^dam 




399 


Sellenberg, Amy 




243 


Shule, Chri.stopher M. 




400 


Sladek, Ember 




400 


chnciiler, .A 




348 


Sellman, Chad 




280 


Shull, Brooks 




276 


Slatten, S. 




264 


chneider, Amanda 




239 


Semeniuk, Tanya 




399 


Shunk. Daniel J. 




400 


Slattery, Mike 




241 


chneider, David 




284 


Sensenbrenner, Sara 


399 


402 


Shunk, Donald 




400 


Slaw, Jeni 




239 


chneider. David L, 




399 


Sentman, K, 




266 


Shwartzbaugh, Anne 




46 


Slaymaker, Carrie 


243 


367 


chneider, Elis.sa F, 


281 


399 


.Septon, Brian 




399 


Sibaja, Hector 




400 


Slazinik, Ed 




326 


chneider, Jeffrey 




399 


Serafin, Andrew 




399 


Sibley, Tricia 




400 


Slick, E, 




266 


chneider, Michael 




399 


Seraphin, Brigitte 




399 


Sicougsky, Brooke 




213 


Sloat, Amy 




400 


chneider, Stephen 




324 


Sergio, Cathy 




399 


Sideman, Dawn 




239 


Sloth, T 




263 


chnieder, Alli.son 




271 


Seribo, Virg 




399 


Sidle. Eric 




262 


Slotkay, K, 




240 


choeninger, J, 




236 


Serlin, Jodie 


239 


348 


Sieben, M, 




278 


Slowik, Jean 


327 


400 


choeptle, Caria 


302 


303 


Serrano, Roxana 


249 


399 


Siebert, Jennifer 




243 


Slusar, Karen 




400 


chonohoff, G, 




257 


Setlak, Bob 




260 


Siedband, Brian 




339 


Slutsky, Nancy 




239 


chott. Erich 




237 


Setzen, Leah 


300 


301 


Sieffert, Margaret A, 




400 


Slymon. Soraya 


333 


338 


chram. Rich 




168 


Sevcik, Jeremy 


310 


323 


Sieks, G. 




244 


Smadris, Mike 




171 


chrieffer, P. 




275 


Shade, Maria 




316 


Sienko, Gary 




400 


Smaha, Craig 




290 


chrock. Margaret 




133 


Shade, Michelle 




316 


Sierens, Gary 




283 


Small, Andrew 




400 


chroeder, Beth 




399 


Shaffer, Kevin 




399 


Sikich. Jennifer 


333, 338 


400 


Smalley, Saiah 


243 


338 


chrof, Derek 


238, 332 


399 


Shah, Amisha 




311 


Silagyi, Gayle 




252 


Smait, Melissa 




400 


chuler, Jill 


294 


399 


Shah, .Anil 




399 


Silber, Hilary 




239 


Smart, Missy 




248 


:hullian. Brian 




206 


Shah, Anup 




241 


Silcox, Jason 




342 


Smeaton, Richard 




400 


chulman. Jay 




344 


Shah, M, 




240 


Siller, Catherine 




400 


Smejkal, Michael 




292 


:hultz, A. 




252 


Shah. R. 




331 


Siller, K. 




246 


Smeltzer. Molly 




326 . 


chultz. D. 




257 


Shah, Samir 




310 


Silver, L, 




264 


Smiley, Jill 




239 


chultz. J, 




278 


Shah, Sulin 




327 


Silver, Rebecca 


140 


325 


Smiley, Sara 




271 


jhultz, Mindy 


243 


399 


Shain, A, 




275 


Silverstein, Andrew 




267 


Smith, Abigail 




400 


;hultz. Natalie 




399 


Shames, Michelle 




239 


Silvoski, N. 




275 


Smith, Ann 




313 


.■hulu, M. 




253 


Shanahan. M. 




240 


Sim, Susan 


271 


321 


Smith, April 




400 


-humacher. J. 


255, 331 


348 


Shandling, Alissa 


285 


399 


Simms, M. 




253 


Smith, B. 




255 


--humaker, Mark 




242 


Shannon. Edward 


241 


399 


Simnett, Katherine 




400 


Smith, BJ. 




237 


.'hupak, D. 




251 


Shariff, Mirai 




249 


Simon, Heather 




400 


Smith, C. 




275 


-'hupple, Holly 




13 


Sharpies, Jamie 




203 


Simon, Keith 




400 


Smith, Candice 




321 


Chwah, J. 
bhwartz. Amy 




266 


Sharpy, Andy 




242 


Simon, Margaret 




239 


Smith, Christal 




277 


239 


399 


Shatynsky, C. 




266 


Simpson, Sterling 




242 


Smith, Dan 


237 


400 


.-hwartz, Erin 




239 


Shaul, David 




400 


Simpson, Tyler 




242 


Smith, E, 




257 


■:hwartz. Ken L, 




281 


Shaw, Carlene 


327 


400 


Sims, A. 




278 


Smith, Elizabeth 




400 


':hwartz, Liz 




239 


Shea, Kevin 




280 


Sims, Craig 




283 


Sinith, Gwendolyn 




277 


l-hwailz, Nathan 


324 


399 


Shea, Mike 




400 


Sims, J, 




294 


Smith, J. 




257 


hwechter, Brandi 




239 


Shea, Timothy 


94, 302, 303 


400 


Sims, Michael 


266 


400 


Smith, Jacquelyn 




335 


liucde.Josh 




280 


Sheehan, Ed 




205 


Sinak, Jennifer 




321 


Smith, Jason 


262, 283, 308 


405 


liueis.s, Thomas 




399 


Sheehan, Jack 




292 


Sinak, Tom 




206 


Sinith, Jenny 




239 


liweitzer, C, 




255 


Sheehan, M. 




244 


Sinaki, J. 




246 


Smith, Jessica 




312 


hweitzer, S, 




255 


Sheehy, Cara 




243 


Sinclair, James 




287 


Smith, Julie 




400 


liwciz. Shelly 




399 


Sheils, Shannon 




400 


Singer, Allison 


239 


400 


Smith, K, 




264 


ibiui, T. 




257 


Shenck, R, 




236 


Singer, Matt 




241 


Smith, L, 


240 


253 


igousky, Brooke 




172 


Shenker, Joel 


126 


127 


Singh, George 




311 


Smith, Melissa R. 




400 


ott. F, 




244 


Shepard, L. 




275 


Singharuksa, Vennessa 




271 


Smith, Mike 




300 


ott Jared 




293 


Shepard, Tricia 




239 


Singia, Terry 




280 


Smith, Nicole 




400 


ott. Jay 
|l • • • • • • 


218 
• • • i 


219 


Shepherd, Brent 


• • • • 4 


400 


Sipes, Dallas 


243 
• • • ( 


400 
» • 


Smith, Paula 


221 
• • • • 


348 
• • • • 



J 

s 
u 
\ 

El 

Y 



4 Bosnian Serbs released 16 Bosnian captives after receiving pressure from the United States and NATO, 

5 Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama announced he would resign. 

9 A band of Chechen rebels again overtook a Russian hospital in Kizlyar, Russia, taking with them about 2,000 hostages. They 
released most of them the next day. 

13 An Egyptian military court gave death sentences to six men who the government contends trained in neighboring Sudan 
to carry out attacks aimed at overthrowing the Egyptian government 

15 About 100 Jewish settlers were forcibly evicted from apartments that they had occupied illegally in Qiryat Arba, West Bank, 
by the Israeli government. 

16 A Prague court vindicated a former member of Parliament, Jan Kavan, on allegations that he had collaborated with the secret 
police during the Communist era. 

17 In Milan, former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi went on trial on charges of corruption that he says were fabricated to 
destroy his political career. 

18 At least 10 people, including four children, died when a fire roared through a home for foreigners seeking asylum in 
Germany. 

21 Austria's leadership demanded that the U.S. supply details of 79 secret American arsenals that remain scattered across Austria. 



Index 



445 



i 



YOU SHOULD SEE US NOW. 




THE 




BOOKSTORE 



AT THE CORNER OF WRIGHT AND DANIEL. 

Monday - Friday, 9-9 
Saturday & Sunday, 10-S 



H 



ILLINI UNION BOOKSTORE 

STUDENT AFFAIRS/University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign 
809 S. Wrighl St., Champaign. IL 61820 (2171 333-2050 




A^ 



Costumes^Magic 



101 E. University 

Champaign, IL 61820 

(217)351-5974 

Fax (217) 351-9255 



Over 10,000 Items In StockII 

Magic, Masks, Gags, Balloons, 

Party & Clown Supplies, Invitations, Napkins, 

Theatrical Make-Up & Acces., Costume Rental & Sales 





^ 



TIMEWARNER 
CABLE 



Committed To 
Education 



Cablevision of Champaign-Urbana 

303 Fairlawn Drive • Urbana, IL 61801 

217.384.2530 Tel • 217.384.2021 Fax 



l-CAMPUS FLORIST 

Anne P. Johnston 

•Flowers for all occasions 

•Silk Arrangements 

•Plants 

•Balloons 

•Free Campus Delivery 

•"Flowers World Wide" 

•Fruit & Gourmet Baskets 

Open Sundays & Holidays 
Major Credit Cards Accepted By Phone 

Across from Co-ed Theatre • Under Orange Awning 

609 E. Green Street • Champaign, IL 

(217) 344-0051 




I 



446 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Smith. Rolland R 
Smith, Ryan 
Smith, Tom 
Smith, Trent 
Smith, Wade 
Smith.son, K. 
Smittkamp, Charles 
Snap, Amy 
Snell, .\I, 
Snitker. April 
Snyder, Jennifer 
Snyder, Kevin 
Snyder.'i, Mike 
Sobun. Darlene 
ISoder.strom. BritI 
tSoejarto, Sandy 
ISoer, A. 
Soer. M. 
Sohn, Sascha 
Sokolowski. Anne 
Soldwedel. M, 
Somers, Katerina 
■Song, jibaek 
Son.s, Jeffrey 
Sontag, Gavin 
Soong, Tony 
Soraghan, Tobi 
■borkin, Harlan 
Soshnic'k, Jenny 
Sosnoski, Amanda 
iSotka, Heather 
Soto, Loui.s 
Sower.s, Da\id 
Spagnuolo, Marta 
Spalding, A. 
Spalding, Angela 
Spanjol, Jelena 
Sparr, Heather 
ipears, Marcum 
ipeckan, Eric 
ipeek. Robert 
ipeir. A, 
ipeir. Lawrence 
ipence, Fiona 
Jperle, Carolyn 
iperry, Jonathan 
Sperry, Niki 
ipiggo.s, John 

pike, Deane 

pilotro, Paul 

pinelli, Sonia 

pink, Clark R. 

pire.s, Judith 

pizzirri, Leo 

prague, William 

pratt, l^anelle 

prechman, Sandi 

prinez, Lynne 

pringer, Joe 

pringer, K. 

pringer, Sally 

purlock, Anthony 

pychalski, L. 

pychal.ski, Steven 

quire.s, Kelley 

■omm. Brandy 

Itables, Dori 

jtach, S, 

lachula, Joseph 

lack, N. ' 

fadel, Jennifer 

ladler, Darci 



74 
300, 301, 337 
322 
400 
284 
278 

263, 400 
400 
255 
400 

327, 400 
282 
260 
400 
400 
209 
278 
278 
400 
338 
278 
338 
400 
400 
215 
290 

246, 400 
400 
239 
332 
332 
400 
276 
243 
269 
400 
400 
243 
400 
400 
44 
255 
403 
403 
239 
403 
276 
293 
209 
273 
253 
403 
403 
241 
403 
243 

285, 403 
372 
283 
246 

255, 312 
403 
242 
242 
403 
115 
271 
257 
403 
348 
403 
271 




Paul Grano 



Aaron Kalinoivski and Emma Barker 



StagI, Kri.siin 
Stahl, Charles J, 
Stajduhar, Michaelo 
Stalets, Erika 
Staley, K. 
Stall, Jeff 
Stallings, Dennis 
Stambaugh, Brandon 
Stamm, Kelly 
Stamper, R. 
Stanish, Jeffrey 
Stanley, B. 
Stanley, K. 



■lOj 


Stanley, Kimberly 


281, 403 


Stanley, Mike 


403 


Stanovich, lohn 


403 


Stanton, Mike 


253 


Staple.s, Steve 


403 


Stare. Mike 


154, 156 


Starkev, Colleen 


403 


Starkman, K. 


271 


Starr, M, 


253 


Stauss, J, 


403 


Stawarz, Ryan 


246 


Stawarz, Scott 


331 


Stearney, C, 



-103 
260 
. 287 
261 
308 
293 

236, 403 
236 
240 
275 
241 

241, 403 
294 



.sicbbins, D;n id 
stech, Rebekah L. 
Steele, John 
stefan.ski, Anne 
Stefanski, Joseph A, 
Sieffenburg, J. 
Steffens, E. 
Stegan, Matt 
Stehman, Jodi 
Steimel, Jennifer 
Stein, A. 
Stein. Audrey 
Stein, J. 
Stein. Randi 
Steinberg, L. 
Steinberg, S. 
Steiner. Jenn 
Steinkamp, Diane 
Stellhorn, Alicia 
Stembridge, Katie 
Stengel, Lynn 
Stephen, B. 
Stephenson, Claire 
Sterenberg. Darin 
Stergulz. K. 
Stergulz. T. 
Siernhell, Paul 
Sternshein, Erica 
^territt, Douglas 
Sterzinger, M. 
Stetter, Ian 
Stettin, Megan 
Stevens, M. 
Stevens, Maria 
Stevens, Nate 
Stevenson, A. 
Stevenson, Joel A, 
Stevenson. Megan 
Stibinski, Steve 
Stiglic, G. 
Stiglic, Jeffrey 
Stirrett, Frederick 
Stock, Tim 
Stockton, Richard 
siuffel, Dan 
M( >kes, Dan 
Mokes, K. 
Stokes, Kate 
stokes, Kathryn 
Stokes, N. 
stokes, R. 
Stoller, Jill 
Stoltz, Stephanie 
Stone, M. 
Stone, Sarah 
Stone, V, 
Stoner, K. 
Stoner, Kent 
Stoner. R. 
Stopka. M, 
Storbakken. Shawn 
Storch, A, 
Storm, Lisa 
Storm, T. 
Stortzum. Chris 
Stortzum. Jamia 
Stotts. Retha 
Stout. Barry 
Stowe. L. 
Strackany. Justin 
Strang. K, 
Straub. Tim 



403 
281 

403 
403 
284 

244 
257 
290 
243 
403 
264 
59 
246 
239 
278 
240 
239 

243, 403 
271 
243 
243 
246 
403 
284 
275 
275 
403 

239, 403 

403 

291 

327 

164, 165, 403 

294, 331 

334 

68 

251, 253. 348 

281 

243, 403 
261 
250 
403 
403 
283 
298 
326 
237 
255 
312 

342. 403 
291 
255 
277 
403 
257 
93 
257 
240 
290 
275 
251 
403 
269 

255. 403 
275 
283, 298, 308 
243 
403 
403 
263 
339 
275 
403 



In Bahrain, eight Shiite Mu.slim opposition leaders were arrested, including Sheik Abdul-AiTiir al-Jamri, accused of inciting 
anti-government protests. 

Answering murder charges at his trial, Yigel Amir said he had intended only to paralyze Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and his 
policies when he fired tnree shots that killed Rabin on Nov. 4. 

Poland's Prime Minister Jozef Oleksy announced his resignation, declaring that he was innocent of allegations that he had 
spied for Moscow for more than a decade. 

In Nicaragua, gunmen shot at a leading presidential candidate, Arnoldo Aleman, on the campaign trail. However, they missed 
and killed a bodyguard. 

Hillary Rodham Clinton went before a grand jury for four hours testifying in the Whitewater Scandal. 

Niger's first democratically elected president was apparently ousted in a military coup and put imder arrest in the presidential 
palace. 

In Tempe, Ariz., Troy Aikman and the Dallas Cowboys defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers 27-17 in Super Bowl XXX. It was 
the Cowboys' third Super Bowl victoiy in four years. 

An eight-day-old cease-fire ended in Afghanistan when rebels shot rockets and dropped bombs on the Afghan capital. 





22 


J 


23 


A. 


24 


N 


25 


U 


26 


S. 


27 


R 


28 


Y 


29 



Index 



447 



n 



I 



F 

E 



A 
R 
Y 



Congress moved to transform the nation's l^roadcasting telephone and cable television industries which overhauled 
America's 62-year-old telecommunication laws. Consumers will benefit in lower prices, quality and choices in their services. 
More than a million Russian and Ukrainian coal miners went on strike demanding hundreds of millions of dollars in unpaid 
wages and protesting government neglect of state-owned mines. 

Gene Kelly, a gifted song-and-dance man who is most well-known for starring in "Singing in the Rain, " died at age 83. 
icams have begun to dig up for remains of Bosnian war victims. 

An American soldier was killed by a land mine in Bosnia. The soldier, whose name was withheld, was the first to die in the 
line of duty as part of the NATO mission in Bosnia. 

Audrey Meadows, the actress best known as the feisty Alice on "The Honeymooners," died of cancer at age 69. 

Guatemala welcomed Pope John Paul II who traveled to Central America to give a message of peace as a 35-year guerrilla 
war came to an end. 

Tlie Saddam Hussein re|>ime and the UN opened a round of talks on possible partial suspension of sanctions on sales of its 
oil to relieve widespread deprivation within Iraq. 

The Senate passed a farm bill that marked a fundamental change in our agriculture policy, ending the link between federal 
subsidies paid to farmers. The government had paid farmers not to grow certain crops for the past six decades. For the first 
time in Haiti's history, one freely elected president handed over power to its second freely elected president, Rene Preval, 
since the nation achieved its inuependence from France in 1804. 



.Strauss, K. 
Strauss. Liz 
Stremsterfer. Mary 
Strenshein, Erica 
Strieker, Kit 
Stringham. Bob 
Strode, R. 
Strombom. Brent 
Strothoff, S. 
Striibhar. Jeremy 
Strunl<, Colleen 
Strunk. Dawn 
Strzelinski, Rachel 
Stubblefield, J. 
Stuber, Jason 
Stuchly, K. 
Studinski. Alicia 
Stukel, James 
Stukel, James J. 
Stump. R. 
Swrm. Brian 
Stutz, Cindy 
Sublette. Stacy 
Suckow, Scott 
Sudduth. Matt 
Sulgit. Nicole 
Sullivan. E. 
Sullivan, M. 
Sullivan, Matt 
Sullivan. Matthew 
Sullivan. Mike 
Sulzberger, Brent 
Summer. Nicole 
Summenille. London 
Sunardio. Kadir 
Sunderiage. L. 
Supalo. Susie 
Supan. J. 
Suranik. Todd 
Suroff. Jill 
Susus. Dominic 
Sutherland. Mi.s.sy 
Suthers. L. 
Suthers. Laurie 
Sutor. J. 
Sutter, Jeremy 
Sutter. Tom 
Sutti. L. 

Sutton, Kimberly 
Svejda, S. 
Svenson, S. 
Svetlic, M. 
Svoboda. K. 
Svfjboda. Susan 
Swanson, lirica 
Swanson, J. 
Swanson. Luke 
Swanson, Mar>' 
Swan.son, Michael 
Swanson. Ned 
Swartz, Jefl 
Swartzendriibcr. Scott 
Swartzfager, Christina 
Swc-dcrs, P.J. 
Swedo. Greg 
Sweet, I. 
Sweitzer. Wyalt 
Swenhaugen, \. 
Swinehan, Jennit'er 
Swinger, Rob 
Swingley, Todd 
S/x'zepkow.ski, Mark 



331 
239 
311 
239 
291 
62 
255 
280 
252 
237 
277 

277, 403 

248, 403 
246 

289, 403 
278 
271 
67 
66 
291 
403 
403 
403 
260 
277, 279, 324, 403 
403 
294 
290 
293 
403 
403 
283 

294, 298 
403 
403 
2=,2 

403 

257 
403 
239 
313 
13 
275 
342, 346, 403 
331 
215 
237 
349 
310 
251 
244 
240 
331 
403 
81 
251 
261 
403 
327 
310 
403 
237 
275, 326 
276 
242 
275 
2.38 
257 
252 
237 
276 
292 



Szilva, L. 
Szott. V. 

Szubka, Thomas 
Szyplman, Mike 



Tablis, Corin 
Tabour, Paul 
Taets, N. 
Taft. M. 
Tai, Chiao 
Taino. Jo\c 






269 


Tnkhtehcliian, Ki 


266 


Talbert, A. 


403 


Talbert, Alison 


262 


Talbott, R. 




Tamblyn, Jay 




Tamhane, Kartik 




Tan, Sherry 


243 


Tang, Gail 


403 


Tang, Tze-John 


266 


Tanner. Craig 


255 


Tanny, David 


403 


Tapscott, Krista 


260 


Tardy, M. 



403 
349 
285 
331 
238 
352 
311 
403 
404 
238, 404 
404 
271 
331 




P. nil dr.iiui 



Kevin Talefree and Jamie Ballard 



Tarter, Molly 

Tartir. Zain 

Tarzon, K. 

Tate, Jennifer 

Tate, Ryan 

Taurina, R. 

Taylor, Ben 

Taylor. Coutney 

Taylor. Kyle 

Taylor, Michelle 

Taylor, S. 

Taylor, Simone 

Teach, Jeff 

Teague. Kevin W. 

Teaschner, Dawn 

Tebben. Shannon 

Tebo, Erica 

Techeira. Erica A. 

Teckenbrock, Casey 

Tecson, Michael 

Teelucksingh, E. 

Teelucksingh Jr., Edward 

Teeple, C. 

Tegman. M. 

Teiken, Emily 

Tello, Jaime 

Tempia, Nicole 

Templar, Areina 

Tenzer, Melissa 

Teodorescu. Mihai 

Teply, Jakub 

Tepper. Lou 154, 155, 157 

Terrell, Marti 

Terrell, Wilson 

Teny, R. 

Terry, Tonisha 

Te.sdall, Katey 

Thai. Matt 

Thatcher, J. C. 

Tha%vani, A. 

Thayer, John Gregg 

Theivagt, Charles 

Theodorakis, Athena 

Theodore, Ellen 

Theodos, Tina 

Thienie, Michael P. 

Thigpen, LaWanda 

Thomas, Chris 

Thomas, Christopher 

Thomas, Kali 

Thomas, Matthew 

riiomas, Zach 

Thompson. Brian 

Tluimp.son, E. 

Thomp.son, Erin 

riiump.son. Je.sse 

Thomp.son, Kim 

Tluimp.son, Marquis 

Thomp.son, Sa.sha 

I'hump.son, Terry 

Thomp.son. I'hom.is 

Thomp.son. I'im 

Thomp.son. Tom 

Thonvson. M. 

rhoiUMMi. M.milv 

IhoiUMMl. S 

Ihoinum. Jell 
Ihulin. ,\ 
rluilin, Ann 
rhuini.iH'i. I).i\ id 
Ikc, l.iMin 
I ici he. I hiislophcr 



275. 298 
404 
278 

243. 404 
283 
246 
292 
23S 

211. 404 
326 
246 

299. 404 

211 

281 

404- 

342, 352, 404 

331, 404 
281 
404 
289 
264 
404 
27? 
244 
404 
28! 
404 
3: 
23S 
404 
21= 
, 158, 160-16: 
25: 
29S 
25( 
31C 

253. 404 
26: 
404 
26s 
404 
27C 

330, 404 
17, 7( 

25; 

281 
31( 
32'- 
404 
35/ 
28', 
241 
124 
244 
40* 
Hi 
lit 
31( 

2^". 29f 
404 
2S. 
28( 

298, 33+ 
2V 

240 ■ 



404 
404 



i 



448 



Index 



'ierney, Chris 
■jerney, L. 
■illman, Sheree 
'ing, B. 
pska. C. 

rochiliara. Tama 
'odd, Susan 
betield. Yuji 
'ogas, Nick 
okarz. |. 
bland, Tristan 
olcs. 1), 
oma.s. Tony 
omczak, Meianie 
omczyk, Wess 
omiin, J. 
ompkins. Jason 
on, Allison 
ong, Sau Loon 
Doslt-y, Adam 
Dreja. H\elyn 
jrres, G, 
arres, ">'olanda 
Drto. Rozalyn 
jrtorello, Peter 
atel. M 
hth, S. 
ouretz, Lisa 
ouzioiis, Demetrios 
tjwnsend, Beth 
tacy, K. 
-ac\'. T 
■akselis, Mike 
•an. R. 

ankina. J, 

•isk Joycelynn 

.IMS, A. 

.iw 1 /\'nski, Michael 

• ■: ~ u, Sean 

ei, kelli 

■ella. Chris 

■eseler, Kristie 

■evino, Daniel 

■imble. A. 

impe. Tricia 

inh. Hoa 

itz. Kathy 

i\edi. Dilip 

ocone, Fred 

oeskin, B. 

otier. Tina 

ottier. Aimee 

iibiano, Steve 

uckenbrod, Annie 

uckenbrod. Brandy 

u.sk, Greg 

ivba. K, 

ji. Chiian-Lin Alice 

.li Ichan 

III I, "t'olanda 

K kcr. E. 

n Klt. joe 

11 kcr, Osiris 

il.ini., A. 

iggle. Brent 

•ille. leremy 

illev' C, 

In ,\nnie 
iiMjll, Dave 
ratek, Heidi 
rek. Bonnie 

ivk, Ui.son 



291 


Turek, Jerr>' 


214 


215 


Vilarin, Fran 


246 


Turner, Bianca 




277 


Villa, Vivian 


404 


Turner, Emily 




404 


Villagrana, Lorena 


2S1 


Turner, j. 




278 


Villanueva. J. 


2-M 


Turi^otT, Anthony 




404 


Villasenor, Yesenia 


212 


Tutoky, S, 




278 


Vinyard, Jennifer H. 


2 S3 








Visser. Jeff 


299 








Visteen, R. 


293 








Vivanco. L, 


294 


Ueimira, J. --»« 


.^g|Mtf 


290 


Vladika, Jo.seph 


338 


Ulbrich. S. ^m 


^^^^1 


244 


Vlahavas, John 


291 


Ulicni. Brica '-^ 


^^m 


404 


Vlasak, Andrea 


83 


UUrick. Rebecca 


240 


327 


Vock, Dan 


294, 316, 404 


Uloswich, Jason 




2.S- 


Vogel, Michael 


291 


Underwood, Rebei.i.i A. 


^^^^^43 


404 


Vogelsang, Jana 


331 


Unzicker, Jacob 9 


F ■mBL 


404 


Vogt, Amy 


308, 312, 404 


Upchurch, J, 




294 


Voigt. Mike 


243 


Uphoff, Trent 




284 


Volkman, Karen 


404 


Uppal, R, 




331 


Volling, G. 


289, 404 


Urave, K. 




291 


Volpe, Mike 


404 


Urbaniec, James 




267 


VonBehren, Jennifer 


240 


LIrbanik. Sandra 


129 


404 


Vondrak, Gretchen 


326 


Urena, Christy 


248 


404 


Voss, Susan 


17 


Urian, Maggie 




57 


Voytko, Andy 


404 


Utterback, Pamela 




404 


Vozza, Jim 


278 








Vu. LeQue 


246 








Vyas, P 


239 










291 


Valdez, J. jfli^ 


•^ ^ 


269 




134 


Vahle, K. '•^^ 


W V 


264 




252 


Valadez, Michael ^^B 


r V 


131 


Waak, H. 


278 


Valaitis. Paul J^K§ 


M 


260 


Wackerlin, S. ^ 


291 


Valbert, J. ^^M 


W 


264 


Wade, J. i 


252 


Valdez, Teresa 




23 


Wade, Michelle 1 


331 


Valdi\'ia, Angharad 




73 


Wagner, A. 1 


338 


Valencia, Edwin 




404 


Wagner, Casey % 


269 


Valencia. Gabriela 




86 


Wagnei, Dave ^ 


130, 404 


Vales, Elizabeth 




404 


Wagner. J 


404 


Vallone, J, 




275 


Wagner. |a>( m 


338 


Van Dyne, Jenna 




404 


Wagner. Joe 


243 


Van Santen, Victor 




404 


Wagner. Jonathan 


221, 348, 404 


Van Wig, Nicole 




404 


Wagner, Mike 


114 


Vance, L. 




240 


Wagner, Rex 


294 


Vancil, Aaron 




237 


W'ahler, Joe 


252 


VanderKooy, Kelly 




410 


Wainscott. Heather 


404 


Vandervelde, Tiffany 


271, 325 


410 


Walczak, Tracy 


330 


Vanderweit, Daniel 




242 


W'aldeck, Jess 


267 


VanGeel, Michael 




404 


Waldhauser, Jann 


241 


VanLandeghem, Bridget 


310 


410 


Waldhoff, C. 


264 


VanWinkle, J. 




348 


Waldinger, Heidi 


72 


Vaughan, Derek 




4l0 


Waldorf, A. 


244. 404 


Vaugn, Ryan 




260 


Waldschmidt, Kri.stin 


404 


Vavrik, N. 




253 


Walicek, Holly 


404 


Vazzana, Cliristopher 




410 


Waliczek, Gary J. 


252 


Vecchio. K. 




244 


Walk, Brad 


292 


Veers, Chuck 




241 


Walker, Bryce 


294 


Veers, James 




241 


Walker, Christine E. 


302, 303. 404 


Veguilla, Erica 


310 


321 


Walker. K. 


404 


Veil, A, 




264 


Walker, Robert 


404 


Veluz, T. 


244, 278 


331 


Walkington, J, 


275 


Venters, Allan 


237 


410 


Wall, Don 


267 


Venton, J. 




278 


Wall, Gemma 


404 


Verbic. Marty 




262 


Wall, Kelly 


269 


Verdier, Alicia 




338 


Wallace, Todd 


404 


Verest, Dawn 


20, 28 


Wallisch, Thomas 


2-i2 


Vernei-sel, Dan 




261 


Walsh, Kathy 


257 


Viar, Stephanie 




410 


Walsh, Liz 


404 


Vickers, Ju.stin 




410 


Walsh, Mike 


273 


Victorine, Tracy 


271, 324, 397 


410 


Walsh, Ti-icia 


278, 404 


Vieley, Jon 




242 


Walter, Ann 


285 


Vieweg. S. 




275 


Walter, Gerry 


404 


Vig, Ritu 




76 


Walter, Hank 




263 


Walter, Rob 


267 


410 


Walter, Stacy 


285 


172 


Walton, T. 


250 


331 


Wamsley, Rachael 


277, 410 


290 


Wang, Andrew 


410 


410 


Wang, B, 


246 


276 


Wang. David 


282 


251 


Wang, Frank 


406 


269 


Ward, Erin 


410 


289 


Ward. Gerald 


299 


242 


Ward, Kristin 


248, 410 


243. 410 


Ward. L. 


269 


300 


Ward, Mike L. 


281 


273 


Ward, Nicole 


410 


410 


Warden, Leslie 


248 


243 


Warfel. David K. 


281 


261 


Wargo. A, 


250 


410 


Warm. Gayle 


239 


250 


Warman, Sue 


239 


293 


Warncke, Melinda 


410 


410 


Warner, A, 


252 


266, 410 


Warner. Barton 


410 


l46 


Warner. Chris 


290 


267 


Warner, Julia 


243, 347 


241 


Warp, Christine 


79, 269, 335, 410 


310 


Warzynski, Ken 


293 


246 


Wa.sag, Brian 


300, 301 




Washburn, J. 


257 




Washington, Jerrold 


299 




Waters, David 


410 


^^69 


Watkins, Elizabeth 


338, 410 


■^■244 


Watkins, Joy 


290 


j^V240 


Watson, Chad 


263 


^■V 410 


Watt, Heather 


338 


WM 252 


Watt, Jeff 


291 


261 


Watters. Craig 


283 


241, 33^^, 350 


Watts, Stephanie 


294, 410 


263 


Weaver, Andrew 


276 


289 


Weaver, Scott 154, 


157. 158, 159. 309 


263 


Webb, Ashley 


221, 294, 348 


410 


Webb, C 


251 


293 


Webb, D, 


331 


93 


Webb, Kara 


271 


280 


Webel, Joe 


283, 312 


294, 410 


Weber, Amanda 


243 


243 


Weber, Brian 


410 


280 


Weber, Dawson V. 


281 


410 


Weber. Greg 


293 


246 


Weber. J. 


331 


326 


Weber. K. 


264, 294 


246 


Weber. Nora 


212 


410 


Weber. S. 


252 


410 


Webster. L. 


255 


281 


Webster. M. 


255 


4lO 


Webster, Margaret Ann 


342, 410 


410 


Webster, Meg 


140, 312 


281 


Webster, N. 


349 


255 


Weddige. Chris 


293 


410 


Weddle, Corey 


4 10 


278 


Wedgeworth, Robert 


111 


284 


Weeks, Celia 


264, 338 


338, 4lO 


Wehmann, Greg 


241 


243 


Wei. Joannie T. 


298 


308 


Weicharding, Tari 


271 


279. 410 


Weichel, Lenae M. 


322. 410 


410 


Weidemier. M. 


269 


410 


Weidenbach. J. 


294 


280 


Weidner. Chris 


260 


248. 410 


Weis, Katherine 


410 


125 


Weiss. Meredith 


239. 332. 410 


143 


Weiss, Sandy 


252 


326 


Welch. B. 


246 



F 
E 
B 

J 
V 



8 President Clinton signed into America's law an act that could destroy the Internet forever.The Bosnian Serb army severed 
contacts witli the NATO-led force to show its fuiy over the arrest of two senior officers on suspicion of war crimes, 

9 Pope John Paul II arrived in Venezuela and appealed to authorities to make the country's notorious prison system more 
humane, 

10 A tunnel running through a mountain in northern Japan gave way under an avalanche of mud and rocks, burning a passen- 
ger bus and at least one car, trapping approximately 20 people. 

11 Michael Jordan led the East All-Stars to a 129-118 victoiy in the NBA All-Star game in San Antonio. Jordan won the MVP 
award. About 100,000 Iranians massed in Tehran to celebrate the anniversaiy of the 1979 Islamic revolution against the Shah. 

12 Bob Dole won the hotly contested Iowa caucuses by three percentage points over Pat Buchanan. PLO head Yasser Arafat 
took the oath of office as the first Palestinian president, 

13 Reproductive health groups and national medical officials launched a campaign to get an "after sex pill," which is close to an 
abortion pill, on American drug store shelves, 

14 Senator Phill Gramm of Texas announced his withdrawal from the Republican ballot during this year's presidential race. 

15 Jurors watched a portion of an incriminating video which showed the accused killer of James Jordan, Michael Jordan's father, 
wearing jewelry which supposedly belonged to James Jordan. President Boris Yeltsin launched a populist campaign for re- 
election with attacks on Russia's "suffocating" Soviet past. 



Index 



449 



H 



F 

E 
B 



16 At least 12 passengers on a suburban Maryland commuter train were killed after it collided with a Chicago-bound Amtrak 
train near Washington, D.C. There were only minor injuries to passengers on the Amtrak train. In South Africa, a Supreme 
Court judge ordered an all-white public school in a conservative rural community to admit black children after the school 
had forcibly barred three black children frt^m attending it. 

17 A jury rejected AIDS victim James Sharpe's case that he contracted the virus from his dentist. Dr. Anthony Breglio. Sharpe 
accused Breglio of passing on the viais while he was extracting some of Sharpe's teeth. A fire at a hotel in central Taiwan 
killed 17 people. The hotel had been condemned as a fire hazard but apparently remained open because of a regulations 

'loophole. 

iH A bomb exploded on a double-decker bus in London, injuring eight people. Police and British officials immediately blamed 
I he Irish Republican Army for the blast although it was not confirmed. 

19 A single-engine Cessna 182 crashed near the central town of Odell, 111. The crash killed a couple from the western suburbs 
Chicago. Prime Minister Peres said that Israel would hold general elections May 20, more than five months earlier than the 
original date. 

20 Pat Buchanan deeply wounded the better organized, financed and connected campaign of Bob Dole when he won by a 
slim one percent margin in the New Hampshire caucuses. 



Welch, Brian 




242 


West. Derek 


410 


Whitlow, J. 




264 


Williams, Brian 


Welch, Chri.s 




316 


West, J. 


264 


Whitlow. James 




411 


Williams, Cheryl 


Wellington. Aaron 




289 


West, Lindsay 


243 


Whittlinger. K, 




263 


Williams, David 


WelLs. Kevin 




293 


We.st, M. 


264 


Whitwell, Susan 




281 


Williams. Debbie 


Welsch. Meredith 


36 


246 


West, Tamara 


410 


Wiara, Danielle 




17 


Williams. Eric 


Welsh, Erin 


275 


410 


West, Todd 


283 


Wiater, Sandra 




411 


Williams, Her.schel 


Welsh. Jennifer 


255 


410 


Westerhoff, John 


291 


Wickham, Douglas 




411 


Williams, J. 


Wemmer. Garth 




291 


Westerman, Michelle 


410 


Wicklow, Cameron 




292 


Williams. James 


Wen. Amy 


327 


410 


Westermeyer. Brent 


276 


Wieber, N. 




240 


Williams, Jennifer 


Wendelken. K, 




266 


Westphal, Cynthia 


410 


Wieczorek, Mike 




277 


Williams, K. 


Wendler, Laura 




252 


Whalen, S. 


240 


Wiemerslage, Brad 




280 


Williams, Katie 


Wendling. K. 




331 


Wheat, Gabriella 


410 


Wieneke, Gary 


171 


211 


Williams, Mark 


Wendling. Kimherly 




410 


Wheat, Julienne 


410 


Wienke, Matt 




291 


Williams, Melissa 


Wendt. Rosalyn 


332 


410 


Wheatley, Megan 


410 


Wierer, Jeff 




291 


Williams, Michael 


Wengert, Adam 




339 


Wheeler, Gregg 


410 


Wiesbrook, Scott 




411 


Williams, Nicole 


Wenthe, Jeremy 




293 


Whelchel. A. 


240 


Wiewel, Chandra 




411 


Williams, R, 


Wenzel. Ben 


237 


320 


Whi.ston. Daniel 


260 


Wignall, J, 




294 


Williams, Sean 


Werner, Joel 




242 


White. Brad 


238, 411 


Wikizer, D, 




257 


Williams, Theresa 


Werner. Mark 




242 


White. C. 


250 


Wiland. Kevin 


328 


411 


Williams, Tiffany 


Wernle, Jason 




410 


White, Christopher 


411 


Wilcoxson. J, 




255 


Williams, Tonya 


Wenheim. T. 




278 


White, E. 


331 


Wilczenski. Susan 




243 


Williams, Tyrone 


Werve. Rana 




410 


White, Jaclyn 


271 


Wiley, K, 




264 


Williams, Willie 


Wesley. Tara 




131 


White. Jared 


237 


Wilken, Aaron 


283 


316 


Williamson, Jason 


Wesoloski. Karen 




410 


White, Jason S. 


281 


Willard, Arthur C. 




44 


Williamson, T. 


Wessel, Ja.son 




410 


Whitelock. M. Christine 


411 


Williams. .\my 


271 


411 


WilUk.sen. Erik 


Wesson. Heather 




326 


Whitenack, Lisa 


302, 304 


Willi, B, 




264 


Willis, Chad 







.Mackrx 



Andy Gricevich 



450 



Index 



kinko^r 

the copy center 



OPEN 



HOURS 



•QUALITY COPIES 
•FAX SENDING & RECEIVING 
•QUALITY & DEPENDABILITY 
•BUSINESS CARDS, 
LETTERHEADS 
•BUSINESS FORMS. 
NEWSLETTERS, FLYERS 
•COLLATING & BINDING 
•OFFICE SUPPLIES 
•FOLDING & CUTTING 
•RESUME SERVICE 
•PASSPORT PHOTOS 



•COLOR LASER COPIES 
•HIGH RESOLUTION 
COLOR OUTPUT 
•LASER TYPESETTING 
•ON-SITE MACINTOSH* 
& IBM* RENTAL 
•MAILING SERVICE 
•OVERSIZE COPIES 
•RESUME SPECIALISTS 
•WEDDING INVITATIONS 
•THESIS BINDING 
•SELF SERVE COPIERS 



CHAMPAIGN 607 S. 6th St 398-0003 

FAX# 398-1907 

CHAMPAIGN 505 S. Mattis Ave 355-3400 

FAX# 355-3444 



Kinko*s Your Branch Office 



HOWARD JOHNSON 



202 Attractive C^uest l°<ooms 

Lapqe lleaTed Indoop Pool 

Jacuzzi 

Pool I able 

fax Oc L/opL) Oepvices 

LaundpLj racilitL) on oite 



1505 Morth Meil 
C_/nampaiqn, Illinois 61820 

217/359-1601 
Fax 217/359-2062 



f) 



s 



CHOLASTIC 

ADVERTISING^ INC. 



Advertising Specialists 
and Consultants 

Providing professional sales 

and service support for 

University and 

College Yearbooks 

800-964-0776 



Advertisements 



451 



o 

L 
O 
P 
H 
O 
N 



The 1996 Illio yearbook of the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign, Volume 103, was printed by Delmar 
Printing and Publishing, Charlotte. N.C., and produced using 
QuarkXPress software. Frank Myers was the Delmar representa- 
tive and Dianne Gordon was the in-house consultant. 

Cover: The embossed cover is a Lithograph cover using 
process color on a Precote white base. The cover was designed 
|-)y Amara Rozgu.s with the help of Pearlie Eason, Delmar. The 
cover ait was painted by Ralph Criminger, Delmar. 

Endsheets: Front and back endsheets are Sundance Felt 
Bright White with a color application of Pantone 423, Pantone 
363 and Black. 

Paper: 464 pages were printed on 100# enamel and trimmed 
to 9x12. 

Typography: The Student Life section: headline, block let- 
ter and photo credit: Poppl-Laudatio; body copy and captions: 
Matrix. The Academics section: headline, puUquote, block let- 
ters, captions and body copy: Baskerville MT; photo credit 
and subheadline: Copperplate. The Sports section: headline, 
subheadline, scoreboard and photo credit: Myriad; body copy 
and captions: Times. The Greeks and Organizations section: 
The Greeks pages: copy and name lists: FranklinGothic. The 
Organizations pages: copy and name lists: Garamond. The 
Groups feature pages: subheading, body copy, captions and 
photo credits: Stone Serif; drop cap: Garamond. The 
Graduates section: all copy: Garamond. The Index: all copy: 
Garamond. The Division pages: headline reflects each sec- 
tion's main headline; body copy and photo credits: Nueva 
Roman. 



Design: The entire book was designed with the input of 
each and every staff member. Each section was designed by the 
section editor in consultation with Jill Kogan, Jordan Dziura and 
Amara Rozgus. 

Computer Information: All pages and endsheets were cre- 
ated on Macintosh computers using QuarkXPress 3.31 and 
Microsoft Word 5.1. 

Photography: Graduate portraits were taken and printed by 
Thornton Studio, New York, N.Y. The majority of the color pho- 
tographs were printed by Thornton Studio, also. Greek and 
organization photos were supplied by various local photogra- 
phers or members of the organization. The majority of the pho- 
tographs in the book were shot and printed by members of the 
Illini Media Company's photography staff. 

Copy: All copy in this book was written and edited by the 
staff members. Big Ten information was gathered by staff mem- 
bers from the University of Illinois' Archives and from various 
other sources. 

The Illio is an independent yearbook at the University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and is a division of the Illini 
Media Company. Volume 103 of the Illio was produced with a 
total budget of $185,000 with $72,500 going toward the printing 
costs of the book. All revenue was raised by the Illio busine.ss 
staff through senior portrait sitting fees, Greek and organization 
page sales and yearbook sales. Advertisements were provided 
by Scholastic Advertising, Inc. No University of Illinois funds 
were used to produce this book. No part of this book can be 
reproduced without prior consent from the Illini Media 
Company publisher. 



Willi.s, Darby 


• • • • 

239, 411 


• •••••< 

Wojack, M. 


1 • • • • 


• • 

250 


Wu, Christina 


317 


Zackary. Julie 


2i.s 


Willis, Rob 


292 


Wojciesczak, Doug 




352 


Wu, Susan 


411 


Zage. Kristin 


209, 240. 4ll 


Wills. A. 


257 


Wojcik, lolanta 




327 


Wunderleich, Craig 


175 


Zaiz. David 


III 


Wilner, David A. 


328, 411 


Wojcik, M. 




264 


Wundedich, Stephen 


75. 302, 303 


Zakrevi'ski, Eric 


250, 4 1 1 


Wiloughby. Wendy 


271 


Wojick, I. 




294 


Wurster, A. 


253 


Zakrzewski. Kerr)' 


243 


Wilson. A. 


257 


Wolf, Jeff 




345 


Wuttke, Regan 


271 


Zall, Jonathan E, 


4n 


Wilson, C. 


275 


Wolf, Matt 




283 


Wyckoff, J. 


331 


Zamir, Eran 


4M 


Wilson, N. 


278 


Wolfe, Bob 




107 


Wyckoff, Jason 


60 


Zanic, A. 


.'s" 


Wilson, Ryan 


284, 312 


Wolfe, Richard 




411 


Wycykal, K. 


275 


Zar, H. 


294 


Wihson. S, 


331 


Wolff. Kimberly 


327 


411 


Wydra, Brian 


411 


Zarcone, Gena 


243 


Wilson, Samamha 


332 


Wolff, L. 




246 


Wyent, Dave 


289 


Zarno, A. 


269 


Wilson, Scott 


175, 411 


Wolfley, K. 




26-4 


Wylie, Lori 


243 


Zarno, Kimberly 


269. 413 


Wil.son, Tracy 


252 


Wollard, Jason 


206 


411 


Wysoglad, Brandon 


241 


Zats, S. 


240 


Wiltz. Sarah 


294, 411 


Wolowiec, Kim 




326 


Wyzinski, Nicole 


4ll 


Zavala, Leticia 


290, tl3 


Winckler. Gary 


212 


Wolski, Matt 




291 






Zawodniak, G. 


246 


Windy, R. 


331 


Wolter. Bradley 


237 


312 






Zeffiro. Tony 


279 


Winegar. F. 


278 


Wolter, Chris 




261 






Zehnder, L. 


250 


Winer, Jennifer 


243 


Wong, Benjamin 


342 


411 


Yac(iLiby, Tahani .«:.™»«a« 


l-«^^4ll 


Zelaya. Pedro 


•H3 


Winet. J. 


252 


Wong, Eugene 




4ll 


Yacullo. Elizabeth 


_^R69, 411 


Zeller. Scott 


26- 


Winfield. Robert 


170, 171 


Wong, Felicia 




4ll 


Yagoda, Ryan 


^ 242 


Zentmeyer, D. 


264 


Winislorfer, Jeanine 


174 


Wong, Ha Kung 


342 


411 


Yamada, S. 


263 


Zents, Brian 


413 


Winkelmann, Julie 


411 


Wong, Joanne 




411 


Yang, Arthur H- 


291, 411 


Zerbe, Laura 


278. 313 


Winker. Karen 


264,411 


Wong, Julianna 


298, 313, 321 


327 


Yeaman. Brian : ^ 


-/' 290 


Zieba, Matt 


Hi 


Winkle, Jen Van 


271 


Wong, Man '^'ee 




4ll 


^-ee, Rebecca Jl^ 


"■ 298 


Ziegle, Eric 


261 


Winkleman, H. 


275 


Wons, Richard 




4ll 


Yen, Cathy 


327 


Zieike, Jennifer 


330 


Winkleman. |- 


275 


Wood, Benjamin 




284 


Yi, Ann 


411 


Zieren, Jason 


171 


Winkler, A, 


251 


Wood. Sharon 




277 


Yi, B. 


257 


Zima. A. 


236 


Winkler, Gary 


172 


Woodmm. H. 




253 


Yi, Yong 


289 


Zimberoff. Jordan 


291 


Winnett. Hrin 


411 


Woods. C. 




331 


Yocks, na\id 


242 


Zimka. Ami 


413 


Winston-Johnson. Brandy 


48 


Woods, J. 




257 


Yohannon, S. 


291 


Zimmerman. Sh.iniia 


413 


Winter. I 


294 


Woods, Scott 




267 


Yopchick. Kric 


411 


Zimnicki. K. 


2S2 


Wrnler, Jill 


298 


Woods. Tyrone 




411 


Yost, Meredith 


4ll 


Zissman. Da\id 


298, 313 


Winters. J. 


253 


Woodward, Jessica 




243 


Young, H. 


252 


Zi\ic. Krisin 


326 


Winters, Shannon 


327 


Worman, M. 




246 


Young, J, 


252 


Zoloto, .\nianda 


285 


Wippo, Kric 


290 


Worman, Mark 




280 


Young, .M 


2^K 


Zoizopulos. Ana 


413 


Vi irtz. J. 


275 


Worman, Meli.s.sa 




111 


"i'oung, Mike 


24 1 


Zoss. Kim 


332 


Wislxrrg, Dana 


239 


Wozniak, A, 




269 


Young, Paul 


87 


Zsoln.iy, Margit 


243 


Wise, Ijiira 


411 


Wozniak, Karen 




411 


Young, S. 


275 


Zub.ick, c;hristopher 


413 


Wisek, S. 


269 


Wray, K, 




2^5 


Young, Sara 


298 


Ziibei, Robert P. 


281 


Wiseman, Alan 


411 


Wright, Ml, mill m 




2.37 


'loung. Tamar.i 


III 


/ubeit, l)ii,stin 


292 


Wiseman, Kric 


411 


Wright, IkMllici 




4ll 


Voungbloocl. .\l.ir\ 


III 


/uckert. Jay 


413 


Wiseman, K. 


236 


Wright, Jay 




261 


VoungliloocI, R\.ui 


276 


Zuiker, S. 


275 


Wishop, Kent 


237 


Wright, Kathnn 




III 


VcHingil,ilii. I),i\ id 


291 


Zummo, Tori 


')(>. 23" 


Wiihffl, K. 


269 


Wright, Mark 




2(iO 


\'oungien. Jereiin 


291 


Zuniwalt, Shellev 


316. 413 


Wilier, Janet 


276, 411 


Wright, Timothy 


289 


III 


'III, l),iisie 


298, 313, ,VM 


Ziirit.i. M.iiilia 


24 


Wiwal. N. 


244 


Wright, 'IVacilynn 




111 


"luknis, M. 


291 


Zwolinski. M.m 


242 


Wlfxlek, II. 


257 


Wngley. S, 




2"'8 


Yun. Silk Jii 


.302 






Woert/, Jennifer 


411 


Wrzesinski, Justin 




_>«'; 


^iirku, T, 


348 








276 


Wu, Dei 




III 










452 INDEX 






















%. 



^^»f8|. 



\m^y 



:>-"Af 




m^ 



""^mm 




'j^ ' 



.■-<i..: 




-Ainma Rozyiis 



1996 ILLIO STAFF 453 



i-: 



I 




1996 iLLio Staff 



I 



I 



a 







456 



1996 iLLio Staff 



o 
c 
S 
O 


■ 






a 

P^ 


ft 


:^^>^^ 


j^aaa^.: 


1 




'J^^^^^IBhl.. i 


fci 


1 ^^,^ 






■ ^.«' 


II 


lE 








J 


11 V 






^§r:. . 


r 






/ 








^1^9 






1 




/ / 


^BBP^.«'fl 


^B^HI 


' 


/ ,/ 


.»«-, 




•i 




.; 'NllAi'-,': ' 


1 








f 


iU 



-Paul Grano 



1996 ILLIO STAFF 457 



>:^ 



i 




V 



asESJ^ 







Paul Grano 



-Peter Mackay 



1996 iLLio Staff 459 




uring the 1995-96 
school year, University 
of Illinois students 



worked to add more pieces to the 
puzzle. We celebrated Mom's Day and 
Dad's Day as well as commencement 
with our graduating seniors. Special 
events such as Quad Day and Forbes 
Fest each added special pieces to the 
University of Illinois mosaic. By 
joining an organization or the Greek 
system, we made friends and added 
to our own personal mosaic. 



hii. Iiiii.son 



Closing 461 




hnrn 

P 





v^ 



7 



9 


I i^ 


W m ' _ 'MR 


* 










■ 


i.K 


' *''*^^i 




w^ 


*:£^..^ 




T^, 




^^^K '^lll^^^.^P^ ; 1 ^L^r|^^^^^^H|^^^^^| 


^a£f 


^ 1 






-Paul Grano 





very piece of the 



mosaic represents each of us individu- 



ally, but when they are all pieced 



together, it represents the University 



of Illinois as a whole. The individual 



pieces show diversity, but together 



they make one. As each of the pieces in 



our own lives comes together, the 



mosaic that is uniquely our own has 



formed. 



ocl Rcnnich 



Closing 463 



; !«'■- 



-^^ 










^&,""'.*i'; ^■■- ar?^'" 



^ '^^^- 







f«^^ 


'■' A 


^^ ■ ".'/^ 


V 4 - -« 






/ ^-^•- ill 


• /^ 1^ t" 








^ f 

^;4 
^^&- 






f^^j. 


.', f -- 








au 



K^^^^^m' : r ■ r 



>^'ij 



;•*;.-<;/ 
"^•<' 







1996 i/lio Staff 

Amara Rozgus Editor in Chief 

Debbie Williams Managing & Copy Editor 

Jill Kogan Production Editor 

Paul Grano Photo Editor 

Jennifer Arendarczyk Copy Coach 

Kristina Castillo Student Life Editor 

Emma Brennan Academics Editor 

Dan Ryan Sports Editor 

Pam Riley Greeks and Organizations Editor 

Amie Megginson Graduates Editor 

Suk Ju Yun Special Pages Editor 

Contributing Writers 

David Blumberg, Theresa Boian, Kristen Brennan, Alison Gerakaris, Michael Grubb, Steve Hanf, 

Ben Hoyle, Rick Lawrence, Sheowting Lu, Anne Peterson, Andrew Sachs, Timothy Shea, Adam 

Slahor, Chuan-Lin Alice Tsai, Ismail Turay Jr., Andrew Weissman, Stephen Wunderlich, Garen 

Vartanian 

Contributing Production Staff 

Sara Cahill, Colleen Christensen, Leila Crawford, Stephanie Fritcher, Bill Hynes, Ron Lee, Steve 
Liao, Ramiro Nava, Anna Nommensen, Carolyn Perschke, Kristin Phair, Stacie Sundem, 

Lisa Whitenack 

Contributing Photographers 

Laura Boyle, Charles Cass, Seth Davidow, Ryan Donovan, Michael Giebelhausen, Matt Grotto, 

John Hsieh, Timothy Hutchison, Lance Johnson, John Kim, Dave Lieberman, Peter Mackay, Dave 

Moser, Joel Rennich, Claudette Ruolo, Carla Schoepfle, Eric Waxman, David Wolkowitz 



Anil Mansukhani Business Manager 

Business Staff 

Brad Hcubcrger, Julie Kearney, Bill OT)onncll. Leslie Portnoy, Kent Roesslein 



Tlic last little pieces of the Illio mosaic have finally come together 
1 sit here and write this veiy last page of the 1996 Illio, I can hardly 
believe it is all over. I accepted this position a year ago with an incredi- 
by tough act to follow. But as you can see, thanks to a wonderful group 
of people, we put together the University of Illinois' mosaic the best we 
could. To the average observer, the book is impressive in size alone. To 
anyone who has not ever worked on an ////o staff, the time, effort and 
dedication are what are truly impressive. Each perosn who has helped 
nie make it through this year deserves a special thanks. 

Jim, the publishing guru, you were always there to answer all 500 of 
111) stupid questions. You kept me on my toes and taught me to be 
more anal than even you. All joking aside, thank ycni for being an 
almost perfect role model. 

Jill, I can't even begin to thank you. Thanks for living in the office 
\\ ith me. Thank you for helping me get through deadlines, dumpster 
fires and eveiything in between. Thank you for making me laugh (tech 
phargon and juice), and thank you for being my X-Files buddy. You're 
hooked. 

Debbie, thank you for keeping me in line and down to earth. Thanks 
for going along with all the crazy ideas we got in Kansas City. Thank 
y<ui for your wonderful mathematical skills-I hope you never forget 
\()ur calculator. Thank you especially for all of your Illio knowledge and 

, perience-five years together is a long time. Good luck to you and 
Mike. 

Jennifer, I want to thank you for all of your writing experience. I'm 
really excited for you and I wish you and Pam the best of luck on the 
1997 Illio. I just hope that wherever you go and whatever you do, you 
never find Chief Ike's Mambo Room again. 

Paul, thank you. You gave me some of the most beautiful photos I've 
e\'er seen. You taught me how to look at 
photos critically and to really respect photog- 
raphers. And you also taught me to never 
send you to a bar for a photo assignment. 
Ciood luck with your photography-I'm sure 
they'll be studying you in Bob's class some 
ilay. 

Kristina, thank you for the incredible 
enthusiasm you put into your .section. You 
managed to gather the complete mosaic of 
student life in just a few pages. Thank you 
for really coming through. 

Emma, thank you for an incredible section 
\\ ith a flair and style all of its own. Your 
hard work and dedication made your section 
one of the quickest, yet one of the most 
impressive. 

Dan, thank you for the most beautiful 
sports section I've ever seen. I can't thank 
you enough for all of your hard work and excellent stories. Just remem- 
ber two things and you'll always do great: Never say "oh, no" in the 
office, and always tell me the good news first. 

Pam "guess who I'm in love with, " you made it through Greeks and 
Organizations for the second time alive. Keep up the great work and 
your 1997 Illio will be wonderful. And please remember to have Jennifer 
take you to the hospital if you hit something again. 

Amie, thank you for your incredible dedication to the section from 
hell. You managed to complete a horrible section withough too many 
problems. Every graduating senior should be eternally grateful. 

Suk Ju, your Big Ten centenniel section turned out beautiful. I want 
to thank you for all your hard work and experience. 

Jordan, the Quark god, thanks for sharing every bit of your knowl- 
edge and experience with the Illio saff. Your great ideas really pulled the 
book together. 

To the writers: Ben, Sheow, Anne, Adam, Alice and Steve. Thank you 
for all of your wonderful stories. You are some of the best writers the 
Illio has had. 

To the production staff: Sara, Colleen, Ron, Steve, Ramiro, Anna and 
Lisa. Thanks for all your layouts and all the hard word. You really came 
through for us at deadline time. 

i'o the photographers: Pete, Carla, Dave, Chuck and everyone else. 
Thank you for some incredible photos. 

To everyone else that helped me out: Rob and Kevin (the office will 
always be the Illio's), Mary, Ellie, Colleen, the front office crew and the 
IMC Board of Directons-thank you. 

Ryan, what can I say except thanks. 'Without you, this botik would 
not exist. You and Peggy were my perfect teachers. 

Thanks to Dash at Scholastic Advertising and Michael, Ray and Ed at 
Thornton Studio for their contributions to the book. 

Dianne, thanks for all your support at the plant. You were able to 
answer all of my questions and put my mind at ea.se. 

Frank, thank you for your help throughout the year I was glad to know 




Amara and Anil 



that we had the best and most-tra\'elled representatix e in the country 

To the Washington D.C. gang-what can I say but ■'Well, I've never! " 
Our four and a half days were full of fun (the liquor stores all close at 9) 
and excitement (like TP-ing Jim's room). The best part, of course, was 
that Mike, Will (a.k.a. Ugly), Jennifer and I got to fly on spring break 
free this year. Anyway, thanks for a great convention (is that what that 
was?) trip. And watch out for Chief Ike's Mambo Room. 

To Angle and the BEER house guy.s-thanks for living with the world's 
bitchiest EIC. 1 learned a lot from you all this year. 

Mike, what can I say but thank you and I love you. You believed in 
me and reminded me practically every day that I had my shit together. 
Thank you for being there, I hope it lasts. 

Mom, Dad, Alicia and Alex, thanks for all of your support and under- 
.standing. I couldn't have done it without you. 

Finally, a special thanks to Anil for all your business expertise. 

I'm honored to have been able to leave a little piece of myself here at 
the U of I. Thanks for all the great times! 

Amara Rozgus 
Editor in Chief 



Well now that my senior year is winding down to double digit days 
until graduation, I can honestly say that this was the busiest year of my 
college career. Classes, interviews, meetings; but my life was made a lot 
made more complicated when Joe twisted my arm and convinced me to 
be the Business Manager at the Illio. So much happened at the Illio this 
year, I'll just go over the highlights. After scrambling to find people to 
work on the business staff, three Wildcat alums bailed me out. 

On paper our first task seemed easy, but 
after Quad day I knew this was going to be 
a long year. All we had to do was hand out 
order forms, balloons and posters, but for 
the second consecutive year, the Illio booth 
was... not in the .shade. By about 1 p.m., I 
had thoughts of calling the paramedics to 
help with my heat exhaustion. Luckily, we 
made it through the day. 

The next (mis)adventure was senior pic- 
tures. My thanks to the secretaiy who did 
not show up (or call) on the last and busiest 
day of senior pictures and leaving me with 
the enviable task of entering 200 names into 
the computer at 8 Friday night. 

Page sales were next. Thanks to all five of 
those organizations who got all of their 
"stuff" in on time. For the other 95-no com- 
ment. 
All I remember from our little excursion to Washington D.C. was — " I'll 
have another Amstel Light, thanks Mr. Myers." And, Chief Ike's Mambo 
Room. Who said Jim can't pick em? 

All sarcasm and complaining aside, I would like to give a few sincere 
thank yous. Jim, Jill, Amara and Ryan-thank you, I could not have done 
my job if it was not for ail your guys help. 

Next, I would like to thank my business staff for all the hard work 
they put in this year. (It's kind of ironic that Brad has been sitting next 
to me playing Ultimate Solitaire for the past rv\o hours). In keeping with 
Joe's tradition of staff member awards, 1 have a few. In the category of 
entering the fewest orders (seven by my count), the award goes unani- 
mously to Billy O, v/ho also gets the award for the most envelopes 
stuffed. The award for the fewest complaints for the second year in a 
row goes to Julie, Leslie gets the award for best attendance on days 
when we had deadlines. Thanks, and believe me it was just a coinci- 
dence. And Kent, I am giving you the "Receipt King" award this year 
because its going to take all the knowledge and good grades you gained 
in your engineering classes to master how to print receipts. 

I hope next year's manager continues my tradition of Business Staff 
Happy Hour. After all is said and done, I want to wish e\eiybody good 
luck in the future and you should know that you contributed a great 
deal to make this liook a success. I hope if and when yoti read this 10 
or 20 years from now, we are all still great friends. 

Liist but not least, I would like to thank the IMC Board for giving me 
the opportunity and privilege of being Busii^ess Managei'. It is reassuring 
to know that there are organizations that challenge students and give 
them tremendous responsibility and flexibility. I learned things that I 
ccjuld not have inside the classrooms of Commerce West. It has been an 
invaluable experience that has taught me many things about people and 
how to run a business. 

To next year's manager, good luck, you are going to need it. 

Anil Mansukhani 
Business Manager 



!|i 



^'::>'V^. 



m 

m 



A